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CS Professionals Hatchery Program

The CS Professionals Hatchery seeks to transform undergraduate education by replicating the best elements of a software company environment, layering in moral, ethical, and social threads with entrepreneurship and professional skills, to produce graduates who are not only technically adept and effective team members, but also empowered as agents of positive cultural change in their workplaces.

Goals

  • Create a culture of engagement across the entire curriculum
  • Through vertically integrated teaching and learning (VITaL)
  • Creating a “diversity for mutual gain” environment

CS Professionals Hatchery Program Info

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FAQ

Rationale

Why is the CS department adding the new hatchery unit (HU) courses?

These new courses along with future course modifications are designed to cover and highlight specific skills identified and prioritized by a group of 17 industry partners. In some cases, the skills have been pulled out of existing CS courses to highlight their importance and to thread more advanced information in the HU and subsequent CS course enhancements.

Here is how a graduating senior summarized the hatchery unit courses:

“I think this is awesome! I’ve talked to several students that think one of the missing classes is the program was basic system access and file control (a pre-253 class). I think that CS-HU 153 and 250 will cover it. Students eventually learn these skills (some better than others) out of necessity. I think making sure that everyone gets exposure to these topics early on will help future students a lot.”

Curriculum Changes

How do the hatchery unit courses and course modification change the current CS department degree plan?

In order to offer the hatchery units courses, the degree plan changed in the following ways:

  • The second semester science requirement, not required by ABET certification, was removed to free up 4-5 credits.
  • In first phase, six hatchery unit courses were approved: 5 required and 1 elective.
  • The first six hatchery unit courses rolled out between Fall 2017 to Fall 2018.  Additional elective hatchery units are in development.
  • In the second phase, four additional hatchery unit courses are approved and will be rolling out through Fall 2019.
  • Elective HUs can be used to meet their CS elective credit requirements.
  • Students who are near graduation or choose to remain on an earlier catalog, any 3 CS-HU classes can be used to satisfy a CS elective credit.

Review the Finish in Four Flowchart (pdf) to see where the new hatchery unit courses fit into the curriculum.

Industry Involvement

Has industry been involved in the development of these hatchery unit courses?

Yes, BSU faculty has actively worked with 17 industry representatives in the following ways:

  • Identify the critical Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) industry representatives look for in their new hires and seek to enhance with their current employees
  • Provide course content input during syllabus development
  • Review course and project materials
  • Participate in select lectures or classroom activities
  • Led the development and delivery of one of the HUs

About Us

The following are championing the Boise State grant: IUSE/Professional Formation of Engineers: REvolutionizing engineering and computer science Departments (NSF Award #1623189). The 5-year, $2M grant was awarded to the Computer Science department, July 2016.

  • Amit Jain

    Amit Jain

    Chair, Associate Professor

    Amit is the Chair of the Computer Science Department at Boise State University. He is the PI of the CS Professionals Hatchery project, a $2 million dollar project funded by the National Science Foundation to serve as an national exemplar on how to revolutionize the undergraduate CS experience.

    He was the lead for the $1 million IDoCode project that has led to 30x increase in students in Idaho high schools over the last four years with help from education, government and private sector.

    He has received over $6 million in grants and awards over the last five years from various state-level and national-level organizations as well as from industry.

    CCP 355 [City Center Plaza]

    Amit is the Chair of the Computer Science Department at Boise State University. He is the PI of the CS Professionals Hatchery project, a $2 million dollar project funded by the National Science Foundation to serve as an national exemplar on how to revolutionize the undergraduate CS experience.

    He was the lead for the $1 million IDoCode project that has led to 30x increase in students in Idaho high schools over the last four years with help from education, government and private sector.

    He has received over $6 million in grants and awards over the last five years from various state-level and national-level organizations as well as from industry.

  • Tim Anderson

    Tim Anderson

    Professor

    Tim received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1999 from Brigham Young University. From 1999 to 2001 he worked as Chief Scientist at IArchives, developing proprietary OCR and image processing algorithms. In September 2001, Dr. Andersen joined the faculty in the Computer Science Department at Boise State.

    Tim received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1999 from Brigham Young University. From 1999 to 2001 he worked as Chief Scientist at IArchives, developing proprietary OCR and image processing algorithms. In September 2001, Dr. Andersen joined the faculty in the Computer Science Department at Boise State.

  • Dianxiang Xu

    Dianxiang Xu

    Professor

    Dianxiang is a professor in the Department of Computer Science. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in computer science. His areas of expertise include software security, software engineering, and access control. He teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses, including Agile Development, Software Testing, Software Security, and Advanced Software Engineering.

    He has published more than 120 peer-reviewed papers in international journals and conference proceedings. He has received more than $6.5M in grants as PI or co-PI, mostly from the National Science Foundation.

    He created the PhD Computing program at Boise State University. He has served and is serving on the program committee of several international conferences. He is a reviewer for major journals in this areas of expertise. He is a senior member of the IEEE.

    University of Missouri

    Dianxiang is a professor in the Department of Computer Science. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in computer science. His areas of expertise include software security, software engineering, and access control. He teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses, including Agile Development, Software Testing, Software Security, and Advanced Software Engineering.

    He has published more than 120 peer-reviewed papers in international journals and conference proceedings. He has received more than $6.5M in grants as PI or co-PI, mostly from the National Science Foundation.

    He created the PhD Computing program at Boise State University. He has served and is serving on the program committee of several international conferences. He is a reviewer for major journals in this areas of expertise. He is a senior member of the IEEE.

  • Don Winiecki

    Donald Winiecki

    Professor

    Don holds an Ed.D. in Instructional Technology (Texas Tech University) and a Ph.D. in Sociology (Central Queensland University). He is a full-time Graduate Faculty member in the OPWL department and adjunct faculty in the Sociology department at BSU.

    His current research and development activity focuses on morality and ethics, inclusiveness and diversity in professional practice, including instructional and performance-based interventions focused on outcomes (actual practice) in addition to outputs (course grades). He is also active in research and development of materials and technologies that support visually-impaired learners and professionals, especially those pursuing careers in fields requiring specialized symbol systems, including math, sciences and music.

    College of Engineering, ENGR 328

    Don holds an Ed.D. in Instructional Technology (Texas Tech University) and a Ph.D. in Sociology (Central Queensland University). He is a full-time Graduate Faculty member in the OPWL department and adjunct faculty in the Sociology department at BSU.

    His current research and development activity focuses on morality and ethics, inclusiveness and diversity in professional practice, including instructional and performance-based interventions focused on outcomes (actual practice) in addition to outputs (course grades). He is also active in research and development of materials and technologies that support visually-impaired learners and professionals, especially those pursuing careers in fields requiring specialized symbol systems, including math, sciences and music.

  • Noah Salzman

    Noah Salzman

    Assistant Professor/Engineering Educator

    Noah is an Assistant Professor at Boise State University, where he is a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and IDoTeach, a pre-service STEM teacher preparation program. His work focuses on the transition from pre-college to university engineering programs, pathways from engineering into K-12 teaching, and creating more flexible engineering degree options via Boise State University’s Engineering Plus program . He has worked as a high school science, mathematics, and engineering and technology teacher, as well as several years of electrical and mechanical engineering design experience as a practicing engineer. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering from Swarthmore College, his Master’s of Education degree from the University of Massachusetts, and a Master’s of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Doctorate in Engineering Education from Purdue University.

    Electrical & Computer Engineering

    Noah is an Assistant Professor at Boise State University, where he is a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and IDoTeach, a pre-service STEM teacher preparation program. His work focuses on the transition from pre-college to university engineering programs, pathways from engineering into K-12 teaching, and creating more flexible engineering degree options via Boise State University’s Engineering Plus program . He has worked as a high school science, mathematics, and engineering and technology teacher, as well as several years of electrical and mechanical engineering design experience as a practicing engineer. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering from Swarthmore College, his Master’s of Education degree from the University of Massachusetts, and a Master’s of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Doctorate in Engineering Education from Purdue University.

  • Carl Siebert

    Carl Siebert

    Assistant Professor

    Carl is currently an Assistant Professor at the College of Education, and the lead associate for Program Evaluation and Research Lab (PEARL). He received his Ph.D. in Measurement and Statistics from Florida State University, MBA from Duke University, and MS in Biostatistics from Florida State University, and has undergraduate degrees in both mathematics and computer science.

    His current work focuses on utilizing advanced measurement and statistical techniques for the analysis of social sciences data, and consulting with researchers and program evaluators on their data analytic strategies. Carl has many years consulting in the private sector and has particular expertise in program evaluation and research design, and currently receives project funding from National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Justice (DOJ), and Idaho State.

    His professional background includes teaching, computer programming and systems analysis, and executive management roles in quality assurance, training, recruiting, human resources, and operations. He has been PI on multiple research projects, publishes in education and the social and health sciences, and published a book on nonparametric statistics.

    Education Building, Room 408

    Carl is currently an Assistant Professor at the College of Education, and the lead associate for Program Evaluation and Research Lab (PEARL). He received his Ph.D. in Measurement and Statistics from Florida State University, MBA from Duke University, and MS in Biostatistics from Florida State University, and has undergraduate degrees in both mathematics and computer science.

    His current work focuses on utilizing advanced measurement and statistical techniques for the analysis of social sciences data, and consulting with researchers and program evaluators on their data analytic strategies. Carl has many years consulting in the private sector and has particular expertise in program evaluation and research design, and currently receives project funding from National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Justice (DOJ), and Idaho State.

    His professional background includes teaching, computer programming and systems analysis, and executive management roles in quality assurance, training, recruiting, human resources, and operations. He has been PI on multiple research projects, publishes in education and the social and health sciences, and published a book on nonparametric statistics.

  • Ernie Covelli

    Ernie Covelli

    Program Coordinator

    Ernie joined the Hewlett-Packard R&D lab in Boise after receiving his Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. While at HP, Ernie held various roles from Firmware/Software Developer, Firmware/Software Development Management, and Program Management for several LaserJet programs.

    Ernie joined the staff of the Computer Science department as the IDoCode Program Coordinator with the goals of expanding CS educational opportunities within the State of Idaho and to broaden student participation by more, and more type of students. This role expanded to include coordination for the CS Professionals Hatchery project to revolutionize the undergraduate CS experience.

    Ernie joined the Hewlett-Packard R&D lab in Boise after receiving his Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. While at HP, Ernie held various roles from Firmware/Software Developer, Firmware/Software Development Management, and Program Management for several LaserJet programs.

    Ernie joined the staff of the Computer Science department as the IDoCode Program Coordinator with the goals of expanding CS educational opportunities within the State of Idaho and to broaden student participation by more, and more type of students. This role expanded to include coordination for the CS Professionals Hatchery project to revolutionize the undergraduate CS experience.

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