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Cheryl Hindrichs

Associate Professor, Director of Hemingway Literary Center

cherylhindrichs@boisestate.edu

(208) 426-7072 | LA-232

I teach primarily twentieth-century British literature and literary criticism and theory, as well as modernist, gender, and film studies. I have enjoyed teaching introduction and survey courses on illness and literature as well as food and literature. My publications include articles on Virginia Woolf, H.D., Germaine Dulac, D.H. Lawrence, and a survey of late modernist literature. “My publications have examined how authors have portrayed the dual tramas of the 1918 influenza pandemic and and World War One, particularly in light of the changes in gendered identity it occasioned.”

 

Education

  • Ph.D., English, The Ohio State University
  • M.A., English, The Ohio State University
  • M.A., Women’s Studies, The Ohio State University

Interests

Twentieth-century British literature; literary criticism and theory; modernist, gender and film studies; the role of illness in the aesthetics and ethics of modernist fiction

Recent Publications

  • “Things as they are’: Intersubjective Materiality in Dorothy Richardson and Virginia Woolf.” Forthcoming: Clemson University Press.
  •   “A Vision of Greyness’: The Liminal Vantage of Illness in Heart of Darkness.” Modern Fiction Studies. 65.1 (Spring 2019): 177-206.
  •  “I’m Not Sick.’ I Said, ‘I’m Wounded’”: Disrupting Wounded Masculinity Through the Lyrical Spaces of War.” Affective Materialities: Reorienting the Body in Modernist Literature. Ed. Kara Watts, Robin Hackett, and Molly Hall. Gainesville: U of Florida P, 2018. 79–102.
  •  “The Fly and the Displaced Self: Affective Potential in the Epiphanic Moments of Mansfield, Woolf, and Lawrence.” Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf. Ed. Gerri Kimber, Tim Martin, and Christine Froula. Edinburg: Edinburg U P, 2018. 102-116.
  •  “Woolf and Illness.” Virginia Woolf Miscellany. 90 (Fall 2016): 1, 44-48.
  •  “Reading ‘Moments of Being’ Between the Lines of Bach’s Fugue: Lyric Narrative in Woolf’s ‘Slater’s Pins Have No Points.’” Studies in Short Fiction  37.1 (Winter 2012):  1-26.
  •  “Void of Contradiction’:  the Australian Landscape in D.H. Lawrence’s Kangaroo.”  D.H. Lawrence Review.  36.2 (2011): 43-71.
  •  “Late Modernism, 1928-1945: Criticism and Theory.” Literature Compass.  8.11 (2011): 840-855.
  •  “Find Our Own Way for Ourselves’: Orlando as an Uncommon Reader in the Critical Theory Classroom.”  Woolf and the City: Selected Papers from the Nineteenth Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf.  Ed. by Elizabeth F. Evans and Sarah E. Cornish.  Clemson: Clemson U P, 2010.  195-203.
  •  “Feminist Optics and Avant-Garde Cinema: Germaine Dulac’s The Smiling Madame Beudet and Virginia Woolf’s ‘Street Haunting,’” Feminist Studies 35.2 (Summer 2009): 294-322.
  •  “Reading the Other, Editing the Self: Mentoring in Woolf and Welty.”  Woolf Editing / Editing Woolf.  Ed. by Eleanor McNees and Sara Veglahn.  Clemson:  Clemson U P, 2008.  96-103.
  •  “H.D.’s Palimpsest: The Work of the ‘Advance-Guard’ in a History of Trauma.” The Space Between: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945 2 (2006): 87-112.

Courses

  • ENGL 588: Survey of Critical Theory
  • ENGL 530: Studies in a Literary Period: High Modernism and Late Style
  • ENGL 530: Studies in a Literary Period: World War One Literature
  • ENGL 510: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf
  • ENGL 424: Topics in Literature: Illness and Literature
  • ENGL 386H: Honor’s Twentieth-Century British Literature
  • ENGL 386: Modern and Contemporary British Literature
  • ENGL 393: Literary Criticism and Theory
  • ENGL 268: Survey of British Literature: 1790 to the Present
  • ENGL 275: Introduction to Literary Studies
  • ENGL 210: Introduction to Literature
  • ENGL 175: Introduction to Literature: Identity

Additional Websites