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Program Participants

Fulbright Hays GPA Taiwan

  • Photo of Shoko Asay

    Shoko Asay

    Adjunct Instructor Japanese

    Bio:

    Shoko is an Adjunct Instructor of Japanese in the Department of World Languages at Boise State University. She also serves as the Japanese Concurrent Enrollment Liaison and is a Quality Matters Reviewer at the eCampus with experience incorporating technology into her teaching and strong knowledge of backward course design. Her background in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural awareness enhances her mindful but competitive approach along with collaboration with professors from across campus. Shoko is fueled by her passion for understanding the nuances of cross-cultural universal design of courses. She considers herself a ‘forever student,’ eager to both build on her academic foundations in education, technology, business, and language pedagogy, and stay in tune with the latest educational technology through continued coursework. Meanwhile, she has been attending numerous professional development workshops to improve the productivity of the Japanese Section and to support her department and community by providing an effectively designed communicative learning environment. Shoko is always interested in a challenge.

    Project:

    My project is connected with opening a in-country “study abroad opportunity” for learners of the Japanese language who are in intermediate level. In an interpretive reading and listening activity, students will start by answering some simple travel questions. Then, students will listen to a voice recording and attempt to answer questions on a worksheet. Using that information, they will decide in partners where they would like to study abroad and present the necessary information to the large group. In terms of learning goals, I can identify similarities and differences among my culture, Taiwanese, and Japanese culture. I can identify the topic and related information in a conversation. I can understand basic questions and participate in a conversation with a partner about traveling. I can understand the current issues affecting Taiwan in connection with Japan and the rest of Asia. The final product of my project will be an Open Educational Resources (OER) for Japanese language learners (intermediate level) who can use planned interpretive reading and listening activities. This Taiwan experience will be helpful to complete my project more authentically (i.e. photos; videos; audio recording). I plan to disseminate the experience and the final product through the department media team, https://www.oercommons.org/ and community website.

    World Languages Department
    Bio:

    Shoko is an Adjunct Instructor of Japanese in the Department of World Languages at Boise State University. She also serves as the Japanese Concurrent Enrollment Liaison and is a Quality Matters Reviewer at the eCampus with experience incorporating technology into her teaching and strong knowledge of backward course design. Her background in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural awareness enhances her mindful but competitive approach along with collaboration with professors from across campus. Shoko is fueled by her passion for understanding the nuances of cross-cultural universal design of courses. She considers herself a ‘forever student,’ eager to both build on her academic foundations in education, technology, business, and language pedagogy, and stay in tune with the latest educational technology through continued coursework. Meanwhile, she has been attending numerous professional development workshops to improve the productivity of the Japanese Section and to support her department and community by providing an effectively designed communicative learning environment. Shoko is always interested in a challenge.

    Project:

    My project is connected with opening a in-country “study abroad opportunity” for learners of the Japanese language who are in intermediate level. In an interpretive reading and listening activity, students will start by answering some simple travel questions. Then, students will listen to a voice recording and attempt to answer questions on a worksheet. Using that information, they will decide in partners where they would like to study abroad and present the necessary information to the large group. In terms of learning goals, I can identify similarities and differences among my culture, Taiwanese, and Japanese culture. I can identify the topic and related information in a conversation. I can understand basic questions and participate in a conversation with a partner about traveling. I can understand the current issues affecting Taiwan in connection with Japan and the rest of Asia. The final product of my project will be an Open Educational Resources (OER) for Japanese language learners (intermediate level) who can use planned interpretive reading and listening activities. This Taiwan experience will be helpful to complete my project more authentically (i.e. photos; videos; audio recording). I plan to disseminate the experience and the final product through the department media team, https://www.oercommons.org/ and community website.

  • Photo of Iryna Babik

    Iryna Babik, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor

    Bio:

    Iryna Babik is a developmental psychologist with extensive expertise in developmental research methodology and statistical data analysis. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2014 and joined Boise State University in 2019. Her research focuses on the role of sensorimotor exploration in cognitive development during childhood, as well as cultural aspects of information processing and cognitive development. Her teaching interests are in cross-cultural psychology, specifically, contrasting Western and Eastern cultures and ways of thinking. Dr. Babik’s multicultural background, extensive independent travel, experience teaching and advising a diverse range of students, and conducting cross-cultural research made her a strong advocate for equity, diversity, and inclusion.

    Project:

    Iryna’s project focuses on collecting materials to improve a PSYC 219 Cross-Cultural Psychology course. Specifically, she will conduct interviews with Taiwanese mothers and educators to explore their cultural/parental believes about the role of play in early child development, the role of education in children’s success, the role of parents’ involvement in children’s academic outcomes, as well as generational changes in these values and believes across time. Iryna hopes to gain insights into parental and educational practices in Taiwan that would inform not only her curricular activities, but also her research on cultural differences in early cognitive development and academic performance.

    Psychological Sciences
    Bio:

    Iryna Babik is a developmental psychologist with extensive expertise in developmental research methodology and statistical data analysis. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2014 and joined Boise State University in 2019. Her research focuses on the role of sensorimotor exploration in cognitive development during childhood, as well as cultural aspects of information processing and cognitive development. Her teaching interests are in cross-cultural psychology, specifically, contrasting Western and Eastern cultures and ways of thinking. Dr. Babik’s multicultural background, extensive independent travel, experience teaching and advising a diverse range of students, and conducting cross-cultural research made her a strong advocate for equity, diversity, and inclusion.

    Project:

    Iryna’s project focuses on collecting materials to improve a PSYC 219 Cross-Cultural Psychology course. Specifically, she will conduct interviews with Taiwanese mothers and educators to explore their cultural/parental believes about the role of play in early child development, the role of education in children’s success, the role of parents’ involvement in children’s academic outcomes, as well as generational changes in these values and believes across time. Iryna hopes to gain insights into parental and educational practices in Taiwan that would inform not only her curricular activities, but also her research on cultural differences in early cognitive development and academic performance.

  • Photo Kevin Bailey

    Kevin Bailey

    8th Grade Humanities

    Bio:

    I was born and raised in North Pole, Alaska, and moved to Boise in 2012. I graduated from Northwest Nazarene University in 2016 with a  B.A. in Secondary Education in History and Political Science. I started teaching at Ridgevue High School in Nampa, Idaho, in 2016, and I am finishing up my fourth year teaching AP Comparative Government and Politics, AP U.S. Government and Politics and U.S. History. While teaching, I have been working on my Master of Divinity, which I will be finishing up in the fall of 2020. I really enjoy traveling internationally; I have been to Uganda, Mexico, Spain, and Iceland. Any time I go somewhere new I love trying the local food and drinks and believe that culture is best experienced at a table. I love to read, and my wife tells me that I have a book-buying addiction, to which I always reply, “Just one more and I promise I will quit.” A few years ago I got into ultra-running (any distance over a marathon), and last year I completed my first 50-mile race. I am currently training for my first 100-mile race, which will take place in the fall. I love the outdoors, and I can’t wait to experience the beauty that Taiwan has to offer.

    Project:

    A big part of my curriculum is to get students to understand the history, culture, government structure, and political components that are evident in six different countries (United Kingdom, Mexico, Russia, China, Iran, and Nigeria). I strive to build curricula centered on 1) critical thinking, 2) current world events, 3) cultural awareness/sensitivity, and 4) preparation for life beyond high school and the ability to critically think about events involving foreign affairs. I have been working with an English teacher, who is very interested in Chinese History and ensuring students have a well-rounded worldview to create a cross-curricular unit (eventually we hope for an entire course) involving both our courses of studies. We intend to build a culturally immersive/politically relevant nine-week cross-curricular unit for Senior English and AP Government in which students will study a collection of fiction and non-fiction documents related to the current complex relationship between the East and the West (specifically US-China relations, and their impact on global infrastructure/economy).

    The final goal for this project is to create a new second-quarter unit that would help students 1) understand the cultural and political differences between eastern and western societies, 2) explore the significance and complexities of modern trans-pacific relations, 3) appreciate the rich literary, philosophical, and religious traditions of East Asia (providing an Asian voice to our very Western collection of texts), and 4) prepare students to better understand/participate in their role as global citizens.

    Bio:

    I was born and raised in North Pole, Alaska, and moved to Boise in 2012. I graduated from Northwest Nazarene University in 2016 with a  B.A. in Secondary Education in History and Political Science. I started teaching at Ridgevue High School in Nampa, Idaho, in 2016, and I am finishing up my fourth year teaching AP Comparative Government and Politics, AP U.S. Government and Politics and U.S. History. While teaching, I have been working on my Master of Divinity, which I will be finishing up in the fall of 2020. I really enjoy traveling internationally; I have been to Uganda, Mexico, Spain, and Iceland. Any time I go somewhere new I love trying the local food and drinks and believe that culture is best experienced at a table. I love to read, and my wife tells me that I have a book-buying addiction, to which I always reply, “Just one more and I promise I will quit.” A few years ago I got into ultra-running (any distance over a marathon), and last year I completed my first 50-mile race. I am currently training for my first 100-mile race, which will take place in the fall. I love the outdoors, and I can’t wait to experience the beauty that Taiwan has to offer.

    Project:

    A big part of my curriculum is to get students to understand the history, culture, government structure, and political components that are evident in six different countries (United Kingdom, Mexico, Russia, China, Iran, and Nigeria). I strive to build curricula centered on 1) critical thinking, 2) current world events, 3) cultural awareness/sensitivity, and 4) preparation for life beyond high school and the ability to critically think about events involving foreign affairs. I have been working with an English teacher, who is very interested in Chinese History and ensuring students have a well-rounded worldview to create a cross-curricular unit (eventually we hope for an entire course) involving both our courses of studies. We intend to build a culturally immersive/politically relevant nine-week cross-curricular unit for Senior English and AP Government in which students will study a collection of fiction and non-fiction documents related to the current complex relationship between the East and the West (specifically US-China relations, and their impact on global infrastructure/economy).

    The final goal for this project is to create a new second-quarter unit that would help students 1) understand the cultural and political differences between eastern and western societies, 2) explore the significance and complexities of modern trans-pacific relations, 3) appreciate the rich literary, philosophical, and religious traditions of East Asia (providing an Asian voice to our very Western collection of texts), and 4) prepare students to better understand/participate in their role as global citizens.

  • Photo of Janna Brown

    Janna Brown

    First Grade Teacher

    Bio:

    Janna Brown is a first-grade teacher at Sage International School here in Boise, Idaho.  Originally from Northwest Indiana, Janna is an alumna of Indiana Wesleyan University where she received a degree in Elementary Education and Intercultural Studies. She was able to do part of her student teaching at the International School of Port of Spain, Trinidad and after graduation went on to teach Kindergarten for four years at an international school in Jakarta, Indonesia. There she fell in love with traveling, diverse children’s literature and her now-husband who brought her back to his hometown of Boise. Janna’s interests are cooking plant-based foods, writing children’s books, camping and snuggling with their three-legged Indonesian kitty Ginny.

    Project:

    Janna leads her Primary Years Programme at Sage International in organizing and acquiring materials to ensure teachers and students have access to diverse perspectives for their International Baccalaureate curriculum. Through this Fulbright Hays group project abroad, Janna hopes to learn the role of children’s literature and creative writing in the primary classroom in Taiwan. For her final project, she plans to bring back literature and corresponding lesson plans for primary teachers at Sage and Forge International Schools to share insights into Asian culture with their students.  She also plans to integrate her learning into Sage’s International Reading Week. This will help ensure that teachers and students in Idaho have access to first-hand diverse resources and perspectives.

    Bio:

    Janna Brown is a first-grade teacher at Sage International School here in Boise, Idaho.  Originally from Northwest Indiana, Janna is an alumna of Indiana Wesleyan University where she received a degree in Elementary Education and Intercultural Studies. She was able to do part of her student teaching at the International School of Port of Spain, Trinidad and after graduation went on to teach Kindergarten for four years at an international school in Jakarta, Indonesia. There she fell in love with traveling, diverse children’s literature and her now-husband who brought her back to his hometown of Boise. Janna’s interests are cooking plant-based foods, writing children’s books, camping and snuggling with their three-legged Indonesian kitty Ginny.

    Project:

    Janna leads her Primary Years Programme at Sage International in organizing and acquiring materials to ensure teachers and students have access to diverse perspectives for their International Baccalaureate curriculum. Through this Fulbright Hays group project abroad, Janna hopes to learn the role of children’s literature and creative writing in the primary classroom in Taiwan. For her final project, she plans to bring back literature and corresponding lesson plans for primary teachers at Sage and Forge International Schools to share insights into Asian culture with their students.  She also plans to integrate her learning into Sage’s International Reading Week. This will help ensure that teachers and students in Idaho have access to first-hand diverse resources and perspectives.

  • Anne Hamby, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor

    Bio:

    Dr. Hamby’s research focus is in the area of consumer psychology. Specifically, she studies how emotional and structural aspects of stories engage their audiences, and how engagement in stories influence beliefs and behavior in a marketing context. She is also interested in issues related to consumer well-being and examines the psychological, social, and cultural factors that influence risky consumption practices and prosocial behavior. Her research has been published in leading outlets in marketing including the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Consumer Psychology, Journal of Advertising, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, and others.

    Project:

    My project will be a new module for my consumer behavior course that focuses on East Asian consumer behavior. This module will describe the forces that motivate East Asian individuals to consume, the role of social influence on consumer behavior, and how aspects of the marketing mix (product design, distribution outlets, pricing, promotion) influence consumer behavior in the East Asian context. This content will help marketing students understand how consumer behavior differs (and is similar) in East Asian versus Western contexts, which will aid their professional development as marketers.

    Bio:

    Dr. Hamby’s research focus is in the area of consumer psychology. Specifically, she studies how emotional and structural aspects of stories engage their audiences, and how engagement in stories influence beliefs and behavior in a marketing context. She is also interested in issues related to consumer well-being and examines the psychological, social, and cultural factors that influence risky consumption practices and prosocial behavior. Her research has been published in leading outlets in marketing including the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Consumer Psychology, Journal of Advertising, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, and others.

    Project:

    My project will be a new module for my consumer behavior course that focuses on East Asian consumer behavior. This module will describe the forces that motivate East Asian individuals to consume, the role of social influence on consumer behavior, and how aspects of the marketing mix (product design, distribution outlets, pricing, promotion) influence consumer behavior in the East Asian context. This content will help marketing students understand how consumer behavior differs (and is similar) in East Asian versus Western contexts, which will aid their professional development as marketers.

  • Photo of Sarah Higgins

    Sarah Higgins

    Crew Leader

    Bio:

    I grew up in Soda Springs, Idaho, which is where I learned to appreciate the outdoors and explore wild places. After high school I pursued a degree in History and Literacy Education from The College of Idaho. I completed my MAT the following year, while working and snowboarding in Sun Valley, Idaho. Since then I have had a variety of teaching positions in Seattle, Washington, Shoshone (Idaho), and Taipei (Taiwan). Currently I am a 7th/8th grade Crew Leader at Anser Charter School in Garden City. When I am not teaching I can be found reading or playing outside.

    Project:

    As the World Studies Crew Leader at Anser Charter School, I teach 12-week units of study, which  we call Expeditions. Within these units students engage in a wide range of texts, create projects, write research essays, fulfill service learning fieldwork, participate in socratic seminars, give formal presentations and performances, and hear from experts in the Boise area on the topic they’re studying. These will all be components of my final project. While in Taiwan I plan to write a new Expedition that will focus on the Taiwan history, culture, and their approach to education. Through this Expedition, students will compare their own life experiences to the experience of students across the globe.

    Anser Charter School
    Bio:

    I grew up in Soda Springs, Idaho, which is where I learned to appreciate the outdoors and explore wild places. After high school I pursued a degree in History and Literacy Education from The College of Idaho. I completed my MAT the following year, while working and snowboarding in Sun Valley, Idaho. Since then I have had a variety of teaching positions in Seattle, Washington, Shoshone (Idaho), and Taipei (Taiwan). Currently I am a 7th/8th grade Crew Leader at Anser Charter School in Garden City. When I am not teaching I can be found reading or playing outside.

    Project:

    As the World Studies Crew Leader at Anser Charter School, I teach 12-week units of study, which  we call Expeditions. Within these units students engage in a wide range of texts, create projects, write research essays, fulfill service learning fieldwork, participate in socratic seminars, give formal presentations and performances, and hear from experts in the Boise area on the topic they’re studying. These will all be components of my final project. While in Taiwan I plan to write a new Expedition that will focus on the Taiwan history, culture, and their approach to education. Through this Expedition, students will compare their own life experiences to the experience of students across the globe.

  • Photo of Marisa Hill

    Marisa Hill

    Lecturer

    Bio:

    Marisa Hill has taught at Boise State since 2005. She enjoys teaching about the “thing” we do more than anything else — communication. She teaches courses related to public communication, rhetorical analysis, persuasion in everyday life, and communication theories. Prior to Boise State, Marisa taught at Texas A&M University and Idaho State University. Her research interests range from the First Amendment Right of Petition (the “forgotten right”) to social movement rhetoric to war rhetoric to public presentation in different cultures. In other words, studying various aspects of communication in times of change.

    Marisa helped create a pilot public speaking training course for the Boise Refugee Speaker’s Bureau, through the Idaho Office of Refugees (2015). This volunteer course helped provide refugees specialized training as they engaged in public dialogue and advocacy. Marisa continues to work with refugee families and agencies in the Boise community. Although she claims Texas as “home,” she has fallen for Idaho and the beauty and adventure of the Boise area. She enjoys spending time with her family, and they’re often found exploring nearby hikes and hot springs, water-skiing and wake-surfing, trying new restaurants, camping, or watching college sports. They have a goal to visit all of the National Parks.

    Project:

    Marisa Hill’s proposed project will highlight the global and intercultural aspects of oral communication and public presentations, focusing on how conventions and practices differ across cultures. Being part of the Fulbright-Hays Group Project in Taiwan will allow her to learn more about Taiwanese public speaking norms and practices.  Marisa has taught at the intersection of oral communication/public presentations and intercultural competencies for many years; this project brings together many of her teaching and service interests. With experience in teaching public presentation courses, cross-cultural sections of the introductory communication course, online course development, and volunteer work with the Idaho Office of Refugees, Marisa seeks to expand her teaching and service background in Taiwan. As part of the Fulbright Hays Project, she hopes to talk with peer instructors, learning about the pedagogical approaches, presentation practices, and course objectives of public presentation classes in Taiwan.

    Department of Communication & Media
    Bio:

    Marisa Hill has taught at Boise State since 2005. She enjoys teaching about the “thing” we do more than anything else — communication. She teaches courses related to public communication, rhetorical analysis, persuasion in everyday life, and communication theories. Prior to Boise State, Marisa taught at Texas A&M University and Idaho State University. Her research interests range from the First Amendment Right of Petition (the “forgotten right”) to social movement rhetoric to war rhetoric to public presentation in different cultures. In other words, studying various aspects of communication in times of change.

    Marisa helped create a pilot public speaking training course for the Boise Refugee Speaker’s Bureau, through the Idaho Office of Refugees (2015). This volunteer course helped provide refugees specialized training as they engaged in public dialogue and advocacy. Marisa continues to work with refugee families and agencies in the Boise community. Although she claims Texas as “home,” she has fallen for Idaho and the beauty and adventure of the Boise area. She enjoys spending time with her family, and they’re often found exploring nearby hikes and hot springs, water-skiing and wake-surfing, trying new restaurants, camping, or watching college sports. They have a goal to visit all of the National Parks.

    Project:

    Marisa Hill’s proposed project will highlight the global and intercultural aspects of oral communication and public presentations, focusing on how conventions and practices differ across cultures. Being part of the Fulbright-Hays Group Project in Taiwan will allow her to learn more about Taiwanese public speaking norms and practices.  Marisa has taught at the intersection of oral communication/public presentations and intercultural competencies for many years; this project brings together many of her teaching and service interests. With experience in teaching public presentation courses, cross-cultural sections of the introductory communication course, online course development, and volunteer work with the Idaho Office of Refugees, Marisa seeks to expand her teaching and service background in Taiwan. As part of the Fulbright Hays Project, she hopes to talk with peer instructors, learning about the pedagogical approaches, presentation practices, and course objectives of public presentation classes in Taiwan.

  • Photo of Calista Houdek

    Calista Houdek

    Social Studies Teacher

    Bio:

    My name is Calista Houdek and I am a historian and social studies teacher at Richard McKenna Charter High School in Mountain Home, Idaho. I am a Boise State alumna and a graduate from 2018, year in which I earned the bachelor’s degree in history. My early history career began as an archivist intern at Boise High School in 2018, also with Boise State University under an internship advised by Dr. Bob Reinhardt. After working very hard and only having a month in between graduating from college in 2018, I was offered a teaching position and I officially became a high school history teacher! I then began creating hands on secondary social studies projects with my 9-12 grade students. When I’m not moving and grooving through lesson plans or grading papers, I play in a Boise roller derby league called Idaho Rebel Rollers. With this chance to study abroad, I’m thrilled to try new things, meet amazing people, and appreciate this opportunity to experience and learn new history in Taiwan.

    Project:

    My project for Richard McKenna Charter High School consists of the creation of a six-week social studies course focusing on the past and present history of Taiwan. The first three weeks will be beginners’ Mandarin language classes as well as a balance of early Taiwanese history. The last three weeks will delve more into the current events of Taiwan and the comparison of Taiwan to the United States socially, politically, and culturally. The last week will be a final project work week focusing on the creation of a personal portfolio. Finally, I would like my students to share their learning at a community-based level whether that’s creating an exhibit at our local library or at our historical museum. To be able to share new ideas, diversity, and cultural differences to the rural town of Mountain Home, Idaho would be intellectually advantageous to our community.

    Richard McKenna Charter High School
    Bio:

    My name is Calista Houdek and I am a historian and social studies teacher at Richard McKenna Charter High School in Mountain Home, Idaho. I am a Boise State alumna and a graduate from 2018, year in which I earned the bachelor’s degree in history. My early history career began as an archivist intern at Boise High School in 2018, also with Boise State University under an internship advised by Dr. Bob Reinhardt. After working very hard and only having a month in between graduating from college in 2018, I was offered a teaching position and I officially became a high school history teacher! I then began creating hands on secondary social studies projects with my 9-12 grade students. When I’m not moving and grooving through lesson plans or grading papers, I play in a Boise roller derby league called Idaho Rebel Rollers. With this chance to study abroad, I’m thrilled to try new things, meet amazing people, and appreciate this opportunity to experience and learn new history in Taiwan.

    Project:

    My project for Richard McKenna Charter High School consists of the creation of a six-week social studies course focusing on the past and present history of Taiwan. The first three weeks will be beginners’ Mandarin language classes as well as a balance of early Taiwanese history. The last three weeks will delve more into the current events of Taiwan and the comparison of Taiwan to the United States socially, politically, and culturally. The last week will be a final project work week focusing on the creation of a personal portfolio. Finally, I would like my students to share their learning at a community-based level whether that’s creating an exhibit at our local library or at our historical museum. To be able to share new ideas, diversity, and cultural differences to the rural town of Mountain Home, Idaho would be intellectually advantageous to our community.

  • Adam Li

    Chinese Teacher

    Bio:

    I was born and raised mainland China. I taught English in China for 15 year before I moved to Idaho in 2006. Then I started teaching Mandarin Chinese at Renaissance High School in West Ada School District in 2009. While living here, I was introduced to camping, fishing and hunting in the wildness as well as enjoying the small quite small town life, which was a big cultural change for me.

    Project:

    My project is to incorporate the first-hand knowledge I acquire in Taiwan and create a language and culture comparison between Taiwan and Mainland China. My main focus of my project will be comparing how Pinyin system work in Taiwan and how much Chinese tradition is still practiced in Taiwan relative to mainland China.

    Renaissance High School
    Bio:

    I was born and raised mainland China. I taught English in China for 15 year before I moved to Idaho in 2006. Then I started teaching Mandarin Chinese at Renaissance High School in West Ada School District in 2009. While living here, I was introduced to camping, fishing and hunting in the wildness as well as enjoying the small quite small town life, which was a big cultural change for me.

    Project:

    My project is to incorporate the first-hand knowledge I acquire in Taiwan and create a language and culture comparison between Taiwan and Mainland China. My main focus of my project will be comparing how Pinyin system work in Taiwan and how much Chinese tradition is still practiced in Taiwan relative to mainland China.

  • Photo of Renee Walters

    Renee Walters Ph.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor

    Bio:

    Renee Walters is a clinical associate professor for Boise State University’s School of Nursing. She is a licensed APRN and RN, and currently practices at the Boise VA Medical Center. She earned her BSN, MSN, and PhD from the University of Kansas (KU), where she practiced and taught for 17 years before coming to Boise State. In 2011, she received the Early Career Achievement in Nursing award from KU.   Dr. Walters has served in a variety of practice, education, and leadership roles. She worked in the KU Hospital Center for Advanced Heart Care, and was the CV Lab Manager and Coordinator of First Aid for the Kansas City Chiefs. She has taught in adjunct positions at KU, Park University, and Johnson County Community College. Since joining Boise State, Dr. Walters has continued her research focusing on inter-professional education and interdisciplinary healthcare practices. She is involved in several community and university committees, as well: she is a co-chair for the Treasure Valley Clinical Connections group, and serves as a member of the Boise State International Education Committee.   Dr. Walters spends her free time with her husband and their two children. She enjoys traveling, gardening, boating, and skiing.

    Project:

    Update current cultural competency learning modules in courses to include Taiwanese specific care. Integrate experience into personal practice when engaging and treating patients of Taiwanese descent.Update Health System Delivery Module to include the East Asian Market.

    Bio:

    Renee Walters is a clinical associate professor for Boise State University’s School of Nursing. She is a licensed APRN and RN, and currently practices at the Boise VA Medical Center. She earned her BSN, MSN, and PhD from the University of Kansas (KU), where she practiced and taught for 17 years before coming to Boise State. In 2011, she received the Early Career Achievement in Nursing award from KU.   Dr. Walters has served in a variety of practice, education, and leadership roles. She worked in the KU Hospital Center for Advanced Heart Care, and was the CV Lab Manager and Coordinator of First Aid for the Kansas City Chiefs. She has taught in adjunct positions at KU, Park University, and Johnson County Community College. Since joining Boise State, Dr. Walters has continued her research focusing on inter-professional education and interdisciplinary healthcare practices. She is involved in several community and university committees, as well: she is a co-chair for the Treasure Valley Clinical Connections group, and serves as a member of the Boise State International Education Committee.   Dr. Walters spends her free time with her husband and their two children. She enjoys traveling, gardening, boating, and skiing.

    Project:

    Update current cultural competency learning modules in courses to include Taiwanese specific care. Integrate experience into personal practice when engaging and treating patients of Taiwanese descent.Update Health System Delivery Module to include the East Asian Market.