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Fall 2022 Honors Course List

All Courses are 3 credits unless otherwise specified.  The prerequisite for all courses unless otherwise stated is admission to the Honors College, however other prerequisites or co-requisites may apply.

Downloadable version of our Fall 2022 Honors Course List

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Foundations of Art (FA)

ART 100-001 Introduction to Art

Class #72471, MoWe 3:00-4:15pm,  Interactive Learning Center Rm 203, John McMahon

An introduction to the basic language of Visual Art.

FILM 220-4003 Cinema History and Aesthetics

Class #72368, Online, Richard Klautsch

Designed to provide knowledge of the development of motion pictures with attention given to the elements and qualities peculiar to cinema which give it validity as a unique and multi-cultural art form.

THEA 101-003 Introduction to Theatre

Class #76219, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, Multipurpose Bldg, Rm 203, Teresa Focarile

Designed to create discerning and appreciative audience members through experiencing live theatre, practicing performance criticism, and studying theatre production processes, theatre history, and dramatic literature.

Foundations of Oral Communication (FC)

COMM 101-052 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

Class #75456, TuTh 9:00-10:15am, Multipurpose Bldg, Rm 210, Melissa Klassen

A theoretical and contextual overview of the communication discipline, including concepts and models of communication; verbal and nonverbal messages; communication ethics; perception; and listening in public, interpersonal, group/team, and mass communication contexts. Incorporates research, preparation, critique, adaptation, and delivery of informative and persuasive messages in public presentations.

COMM 101-053 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

Class #75457, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, Multipurpose Bldg, Rm 210, Melissa Klassen

A theoretical and contextual overview of the communication discipline, including concepts and models of communication; verbal and nonverbal messages; communication ethics; perception; and listening in public, interpersonal, group/team, and mass communication contexts. Incorporates research, preparation, critique, adaptation, and delivery of informative and persuasive messages in public presentations.

Foundations of Humanities (FH)

PHIL 101-003 Introduction to Philosophy: Contemporary Issues

Class #70437, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, REMOTE, Brian Kierland

An introduction to some major issues in metaphysics and epistemology, such as free will, the existence of God, the rationality of religious belief, the mind/body problem, personal identity, skepticism about external world, and the problem of induction.

Foundations of Mathematics (FM)

MATH 170-009 Calculus I: Concepts and Applications (4 credits)

Class #71119, MoWeFr 9:00-10:15am, Honors College, Rm 167, Laurie Cavey

Informal limits. Derivatives and antiderivatives, including trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The relationship between a function, its derivative, and its antiderivative. Integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of calculus to physical models, geometry, approximation, and optimization. Credit cannot be earned for both MATH 170 and MATH 171. PREREQ: MATH 143 or MATH 149, or satisfactory placement score. PRE/COREQ: MATH 114 or satisfactory placement score.

MATH 170-012 Calculus I: Concepts and Applications (4 credits)

Class #75890, TuTh 10:00-11:45am, Math Bldg, Rm 139, Laurie Cavey

Informal limits. Derivatives and antiderivatives, including trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The relationship between a function, its derivative, and its antiderivative. Integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of calculus to physical models, geometry, approximation, and optimization. Credit cannot be earned for both MATH 170 and MATH 171. PREREQ: MATH 143 or MATH 149, or satisfactory placement score. PRE/COREQ: MATH 114 or satisfactory placement score.

Foundations of Natural, Physical, and Applied Sciences (FN)

BIOL 191 Biology I: Intro. to Cell and Molecular Biology* (4cr w/ Lab)

Students may enroll in any section of BIOL 191; however, to receive honors credit for the course, they must enroll in Lab M (below).

Designed for biology and health science majors. The basic characteristics of living systems including the chemical and physical structure of cells, genetics, and development. Recommended: Solid preparation in high school biology and chemistry. PREREQ: MATH108, MATH133, MATH143, MATH144, MATH160, MATH170, or MATH 175, or satisfactory placement score. COREQUISITE: BIOL 227 Lab M.

BIOL 191L-M Biology I Laboratory

Class #77102, Mo 1:30-5:00pm, Math Bldg, Rm 204, Jim Munger

Lab to accompany BIOL 191. COREQ: BIOL 191. Permission of instructor required. To request a permission number for this course, please visit the following link: https://www.boisestate.edu/biology/department-forms/permission-number-request-form/ 

BIOL 227-002 Human Anatomy and Physiology I* (4cr w/ Lab)

Class #70106, TuTh 9:00-10:15am, Education Bldg, Rm 521, Marilyn Koob

The first in a two-semester sequence for students whose career objectives require a thorough study of human anatomy and physiology. This course covers basic chemistry, cell biology, and histology, as well as the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems. This course emphasizes the ability to apply knowledge and methods of scientific inquiry to think critically about and solve problems about the structure and function of the human body. Prior or concurrent enrollment in HLTH 101 and CHEM 101 is recommended. COREQUISITE:  BIOL 227 – Lab A.

**REQUIREMENTS: Students must also enroll in Lab A below.

BIOL 227-A Biology I Laboratory

Class #70108, Tu 11:30am-2:20pm, Riverfront Hall, Rm 216, Marilyn Koob

Lab to accompany BIOL 227. COREQ: BIOL 227-002.

CHEM 111-003 General Chemistry I* (4cr w/ Lab)

Class #70100, TuTh 12:00-1:15pm, Micron Center for Materials Research, Rm 205, Brian McClain

The first semester of a one-year sequence course. A thorough study of the fundamentals of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical reactions in solutions, gases, thermochemistry, basic quantum theory, chemical periodcity, and elementary chemical bonding. CHEM 111 assumes that students without one year of high school chemistry have completed a semester preparative course (see CHEM 99). COREQ: CHEM 111L. PREREQ: MATH 143 or successful completion of the CHEM 111 Math exam. *NOTE: Students who do not attend the first session of their enrolled lab will immediately be dropped from both the lab and lecture.

**REQUIREMENTS: Students must also enroll in one of the labs listed below.

CHEM 111L-003 General Chemistry I Laboratory

Class #70798, Tu 1:30-4:15pm, Science Bldg., Rm 361, Katri Swanson

CHEM 111L-007 General Chemistry I Laboratory

Class #70907, We 1:30-4:15pm, Science Bldg., Rm 361, Katri Swanson

CHEM 111L-011 General Chemistry I Laboratory

Class #70782, Th 1:30-4:15pm, Science Bldg., Rm 361, Katri Swanson

Foundations of Social Sciences (FS)

LING 205-001 Language Myths

Class #72776, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, Liberal Arts Bldg, Rm 206, Gail Shuck

An overview of the complex nature of language, its capacity for change, its natural diversity, and its fundamental role in our participation in social life. Students will reflect on common beliefs about language and learn new ways to examine this uniquely and universally human activity. This course is designed as a cross-cultural course and welcomes students from U.S. and international backgrounds.

University Foundations

UF 100-017 The Biggest Questions

Class #72347, MoWe 10:30-11:20am, Micron Center for Material Research Building, Rm 205, Shelton Woods

Life’s Biggest Questions – Everyone asks questions; some are more important than others. Civilizations and cultures (Eastern, Western, Buddhists, Moslems, Christians, Materialists) ask the same key questions: Where is happiness found? Why is there so much evil and sorrow in the world? What’s wrong with me? What is behind the universe? This class, taught by an Eastern scholar, examines all the major worldview responses to life’s biggest queries, while exploring our assumptions. COREQUISITES: Must select one of the following discussion groups: D009, D020, D028, D029, D103.

UF 200-004 Foundations of Ethics and Diversity

Class #72788, Mo 6:00-8:45pm, Simplot Micron Bldg., Rm 209, Carrie Seymour

Using ideas from philosophy, cultural anthropology, and sociology, this course section will explore the moral and ethical implications of how labels and stereotypes perpetuate outmoded or limited ideas about the nature of “acceptable” social traits and behaviors throughout the world. By looking at various “deviant” categories, and studying the social codes and contexts that inform the perception of those categories, we will then look at how the penal system in America is a case study of how those perceptions play out for 2.26 million people every day. Prerequisite: ENGL 102, UF 100, sophomore status.

UF 200-015 Foundations of Ethics and Diversity

Class #72790, MoWe 1:30-2:45pm, Interactive Learning Center, Rm 204, Stephanie Capaldo

Sustainable communities take on the very difficult challenge of attempting to weigh and balance environmental health, economic security, social equity, and cultural heritage. In this course section, we will explore the critical ethical questions inherent in why we sustain, the significance of diversity in what we sustain and for whom, and the centrality of civic virtue, citizen engagement, civil discourse, discipline expertise, and intellectual humility in how we sustain.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102, UF 100, sophomore status.

UF 200-033 Foundations of Ethics and Diversity

Class #71494, TuTh 9:00-10:15am, Riverfront Hall, Rm 309, Dane Johns

In this course we will explore issues of Ethics and Diversity as represented in the Star Wars Universe. Star Wars is a massively popular fictional universe that brilliantly demonstrates racial issues, drug use, government overreach, the sexualization and objectification of people, violence, and the power of people to make positive and substantive changes in the world around them. We will look at fictional depictions of these issues and use them to analyze the world around us. We will examine all of the canon films and read multi-disciplinary essays about the subjects raised in these works. At the end of the semester students will complete a culminating assignment that delves into an ethical issue, and will explore it using extant examples from the canon, academic research, and current events. Prerequisite: ENGL 102, UF 100, sophomore status.

Other Honors Courses

HONORS 190-001 Leadership (1 credit)

Class #76529, Location/Time TBA, Madison Cunningham

This course will introduce students to leadership theory. Students will then develop their own leadership skills through activities, discussions, and reflections. The workshop will take place over a weekend. Dates TBA. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.

HONORS 290-001 Leadership in Honors (1 credit)

Class #76528, Location TBA, Mo 4:30-5:30pm, Chris Hyer and Madison Cunningham

Course is restricted to Honors House officers. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.

HONORS 390-001 Crafting Professional Narratives* (1 credit)

Class # 72394, 08/22/22-10/07/22, Hybrid – Must be available in-person: 09/16/22-09/17/22, Emily Jones

This one-credit course refines students’ writing and speaking skills while challenging them to carefully consider their pathway through college and their steps after graduation. The course will cover diverse forms of written and oral communication, including essays, proposals/grants, personal statements, and presentations. What each topic has in common is the need to persuade its intended audience in a polished yet accessible manner.

*NOTE: This is a (1st) 7-week course and runs from 08/22/22-10/07/22. This course is exclusively for students with upper-division standing who are 1-3 semesters from graduation.

*REQUIREMENTS: Though this is a hybrid course, most of your grade will be determined by the in-person sessions, which take place over one weekend. Attendance is mandatory on Friday, September 16 from 1:00-8:30 p.m. and Saturday, September 17 from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. This one-credit hybrid course also includes online work prior to and after the in-person weekend.

HONORS 390-4001 Crafting Professional Narratives (1 credit)

Class # 72800, 10/17/2022-12/09/2022, Online, Emily Jones

This one-credit, 7 week online course refines students’ writing and speaking skills while challenging them to carefully consider their pathway through college and their steps after graduation. The course will cover diverse forms of written and oral communication, including essays, proposals/grants, personal statements, and presentations. What each topic has in common is the need to persuade its intended audience in a polished yet accessible manner.

*NOTE: This is a (2nd) 7-week course and runs from 10/17/2022-12/09/2022. This course is exclusively for students with upper-division standing who are 1-3 semesters from graduation. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.

*ONLINE REQUIREMENTS: Excellent time management and computer/Internet literacy skills and regular access to a computer with reliable/high-speed Internet access. For courses lasting 7 weeks, expect to spend a minimum of 5.5 hours per credit weekly on classwork and interaction with students and instructor. Read introduction email sent from instructor to your BroncoMail account by the first day of class. MORE INFO at http://boisestate.edu/online/admitted.

HONORS 490-001 Applied Leadership (1-2 credits)

Class #76527, Location TBA, Mo 7:00-8:45am, Chris Hyer

Trains peer mentors in applied leadership and mentoring. PREREQUISITE: Successful application to the Honors Peer Mentor Program. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.

Honors Colloquia

HONORS 392-001 Paradox, Purpose, and the Human Quest for Understanding

Class # 76003, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, Honors College, Rm 166, Andrew Finstuen

Scholars and various traditions of thought have observed several fundamental paradoxes in human life. Humans are animals and unlike other animals. Humans are bound by time but imagine futures beyond their moment. Humans often experience self-realization by self-sacrifice. These paradoxes shape ideas about how humans ought to face life and death as they search for self-understanding and a way to be in and contribute to the world. This course will explore such themes through a variety of twentieth-century thinkers who have offered profound articulations of the experience of being human.

HONORS 392-002 Good vs. Evil on the Internet

Class #76004, TuTh 12:00-1:15pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Edward Vasko

This class will be a focused examination of how modern adversaries (nation-states, cyber-criminal organizations, etc.) are leveraging the Internet “against us.” Students who are either technologists or general technology users will achieve a heightened awareness of the challenges we face. In other words, if you use technology, this class is for you.

HONORS 392-003 How a Changing China is Changing the World

Class #76448, We 4:30-7:15pm, Honors College, Rm 167, STAFF

You will live with China the rest of your life, so why not understand it? This course examines the factors changing China from within – trade wars, anti-corruption campaigns, three-child policies and blockchain chicken farms – and how a rising China is reshaping the world you live in. Students will learn from the best creative non-fiction literature, news and research on China and dive into the economics, politics, environment, demographics, technology, and religion of the world’s most consequential rising power. China knowledge NOT required, only curiosity.

HONORS 392-004 Media, Culture and Politics

Class #76006, MoWe 1:30-2:45pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Rick Moore

Whether we want to admit it or not, much of what we think about controversial issues is greatly shaped by what we have read in newspapers, heard in popular music, or seen in motion pictures. In this class we will consider the various media forces that make contemporary politics different from that of the past, and consider the extent to which our digitized democracy is healthy and truly represents the will of the people.

HONORS 392-005 Medical Improv: Improved Communication

Class #76007, We 9:00-11:45am, Education Bldg, Rm 317, Nicole Moses

Healthcare providers of all kinds work in environments that are constantly changing and unpredictable, they are expected to have the communication skills to operate effectively and consistently. Medical improv is the adaptation of improvisational theater principles and exercises chosen specifically to strengthen the skills of future healthcare providers in the areas of communication, team work and professionalism. Through participation in a multitude of improv games, learners will develop the ability to think quickly, improve different aspects of communication, gain insight into non-verbal communication, and understand how certain speech patterns promote collaboration and teamwork. The communication skills learned in this class have wide reaching applications to areas outside of medicine and can be adapted to other disciplines.

HONORS 392-006 Reading Cultures

Class #76008, MoWe 3:00-4:15pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Annal Frenz

This course considers how written and visual narratives express cultural ideologies and how we evaluate or “read” cultures through stories and story-telling. Writing is a crucial element of this course as is reading in the traditional sense of the word, but you’ll also be viewing films and going to a museum.

HONORS 392-007 Role of Sports in Germany

Class #76009, MoWe 12:00-1:15pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Beret Norman

This course is a socio-cultural investigation of sports–both historical and contemporary–in German speaking countries. It includes competitive and lifetime sports, fan culture and politics. Topics of discussion will focus on the themes of identity (e.g., self, regional, national), community, entertainment, competition, politics (including the 3rd Reich’s fascism), race, class, and gender.

HONORS 392-008 Invention of Childhood in America

Class #76010, TuTh 1:30-2:45pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Brandi Venable

Did childhood (as we understand it today) always exist? Is childhood disappearing? How can we locate children’s voices in the historical record? Where do parental rights end and children’s rights begin? By exploring the continuity and change in the conceptions of childhood from the Puritans to the present day, we will address these and other important questions about childhood in America. In doing so, we will examine the ways in which childhood is socially constructed and how the lived experiences of actual children are informed by other social identity factors such as class, ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexuality.

HONORS 392-009 A Social Reckoning

Class #76012, Tu 4:30-7:15pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Carrie Seymour

With a focus on 1960s and 70s American counterculture movements and blending studies in the humanities and in cultural anthropology, this course will look at how artistic representations of social upheaval are foundational to the ways in which societies come to develop new habits of mind and embrace cultural shifts. Artistic expression of all types, and especially from under-represented populations, can provide perspectives and reach audiences in ways that traditional rhetoric cannot. Counterculture movements have, on some level, existed throughout American history, beginning in the colonies, but the two decades that this course will cover are among the most influential and relevant to the times we currently live in.

HONORS 392-010 Art, War and Heresy: A Journey Through the Italian Renaissance

Class #76018, TuTh 12:00-1:15pm, Honors College, Rm 166, Erik Hadley

Experience the Italian Renaissance through immersive historical gaming. Students will debate the construction of the Duomo (cathedral) in Florence, experience simulated battles of Renaissance Italian armies, discuss the election of a 15th-century Roman pope, and preside over Galileo’s trial for heresy.

HONORS 392-011 Leadership: Reflection/Mindset

Class #76183, Th 4:30-7:15pm, Honors College, Rm 167, Amy Mayton

Have you ever wondered what qualities and characteristics make a great leader or what kind of leader you will become? This class will explore leadership by thinking outside the box through reflection and mindset.

Honors Capstone Courses

HONORS 498-001 Honors Senior Seminar (1 credit)

Class #70977, Th 4:30-7:15pm, Honors College, Rm 166, Chris Canfield

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for seniors who plan to graduate either this semester or next.

*NOTE: This course is a (1st) 7-week course and runs from 8/22/22-10/07/22.

HONORS 498-002 Honors Senior Seminar (1 credit)

Class #72076, MoWe 1:30-2:45pm, Honors College, Rm 165, Kevin Starcher

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for seniors who plan to graduate either this semester or next.

*NOTE: This course is a (1st) 7-week course and runs from 8/22/22-10/07/22.

HONORS 498-003 Honors Senior Seminar (1 credit)

Class #72202, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, Honors College, Rm 165, David Jones

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for seniors who plan to graduate either this semester or next.

*NOTE: This course is a (2nd) 7-week course and runs from 10/17/22-12/09/22.

HONORS 498-4001 Honors Senior Seminar (1 credit)

Class #76015, Online, STAFF

This version of the course will be conducted fully online using the Canvas course management system. The course takes place over seven weeks. You will be expected to complete two modules per week. You can plan on spending about 3 hours working on each module. Course is designed for seniors who plan to graduate either this semester or next.

*NOTE: This is an online course for the first seven weeks of the semester: 8/22/22 – 10/07/22. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.

HONORS 498-4002 Honors Senior Seminar (1 credit)

Class #72784, Online, Annal Frenz

This version of the course will be conducted fully online using the Canvas course management system. The course takes place over seven weeks. You will be expected to complete two modules per week. You can plan on spending about 3 hours working on each module. Course is designed for seniors who plan to graduate either this semester or next.

*NOTE: This is an online course for the second seven weeks of the semester: 10/17/22-12/09/22. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.