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Spring 2021 Honors Course List

All courses 3 credits unless otherwise specified. Prerequisite for all courses unless otherwise stated: Admission to Honors College. Other prerequisites or co-requisites may apply. Verify that the courses listed below meet Foundational Studies/Disciplinary Lens reqs for your catalog year.

Downloadable version of our Spring 2021 Honors Course List

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Foundation of Humanities (FH) Formerly DLL-Disciplinary Lens Literature and Humanities

PHIL 101-001 Introduction to Philosophy

Class # 10337, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, REMOTE, Brian Kierland

An introduction to some major issues in metaphysics and epistemology, such as free will, the existence of God, the rationality of religious belief, the mind/body problem, personal identity, skepticism about external world, and the problem of induction.

Foundations of Art (FA) Formerly DLV-Disciplinary Visual and Performing Arts

ART 100-005 Introduction to Art

Class #12320, TuTh 9:00-10:15am, CVA 439, Jacob Banholzer

An introduction to the basic language of Visual Art.

FILM 220-001 Cinema History and Aesthetics

Class #13097, TuTh 1:30-2:45pm, REMOTE, Tracy Sunderland

Designed to provide knowledge of the development of motion pictures with attention given to the elements and qualities peculiar to cinema which give it validity as a unique and multi-cultural art form.

FILM 220-4002 Cinema History and Aesthetics

Class # 15062, Online, Richard Klautsch

Designed to provide knowledge of the development of motion pictures with attention given to the elements and qualities peculiar to cinema which give it validity as a unique and multi-cultural art form.

Mathematics (Counts for Honors Flex Credits)

MATH 175-005 Calculus II

Class # 10944, MoWeFr 1:30-2:45pm, REMOTE, Tara Sheehan

A continuation of MATH 170. Techniques of integration and calculation of antiderivatives. Applications of integration to physical models, including calculation of volume, moment, mass, and centroid. Informal convergence of sequences and series of real numbers. Taylor series, Taylor polynomials, and applications to approximation. Vectors, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. Credit cannot be earned for both MATH 175 and MATH 176. PREREQ: Prerequisite: MATH 143, MATH 144, MATH 170 or corresponding satisfactory placement score.

Foundations of Natural, Physical, and Applied Sciences (FN) Formerly DLN-Disciplinary Lens Natural, Physical, & Applied Science

CHEM 112-003 General Chemistry II* (4 credits with Lab)

Class # 10627, TuTh 10:30-11:45pm, MBEB101, Dale Russell

A continuation of CHEM 111 to include intermolecular forces, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium in solution, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, and complex ions. PREREQ: MATH 143 or successful completion of the CHEM 111 Math exam, CHEM 111 and CHEM 111L. Co-requisite: CHEM 112L.

NOTES:  Must also take CHEM 112L Section 003 or Section 008. Students who do not attend the first session of their enrolled lab will immediately be dropped from both the lab and lecture.

CHEM 112L-003 General Chemistry II Lab

Class # 10814, Tu 1:30-4:15pm, Science Bldg. 361, Katri Swanson

Lab to accompany CHEM 112. COREQ: CHEM 112.

CHEM 112L-008 General Chemistry II Lab

Class #10819, WE 1:30-4:15pm, Science Bldg. 361, Katri Swanson

Lab to accompany CHEM 112. COREQ: CHEM 112.

Upper-Division Chemistry (Counts for Honors Flex Credits)

CHEM 397-001 Environmental Chemistry

Class #15888, TuTh 1:30-2:45 pm, MP 101, Martin Schimpf

Chemical compounds and principles that operate in the environment. Soil, groundwater, and the transport of chemicals and chemical pollutants. Carbon and nitrogen cycles which govern the transformation of chemicals as they move through air, water and land. Sources of energy and their consumption, including combustion, fission, and power produced from sun, wind and water movement. Chemical toxicity and hazardous waste. Air pollution and global warming Impact of industry and agriculture on the environment. Progress in protecting the environment through scientific advances and government policies. World-wide interconnectedness of environmental issues. Role played by chemists within the broader field of environmental science. 

University Foundations

UF 200-026 Foundations of Ethics and Diversity

Class #13270, TuTh 1:30-2:45pm, REMOTE, Sara Fry

Engages students in discussion of ethics and diversity in contemporary societal issues. Courses include writing assignments and an experiential learning component. Topics may vary each time the course is taught. PREREQ: ENGL 102, UF 100, and sophomore status. Find more information about this and the other UF200 course themes here.

UF 200-027 Foundations of Ethics and Diversity

Class # 11364, MoWe 12:00-1:15, HEMG110, Erik Hadley

Engages students in discussion of ethics and diversity in contemporary societal issues. Courses include writing assignments and an experiential learning component. Topics may vary each time the course is taught. PREREQ: ENGL 102, UF 100, and sophomore status. Find more information about this and the other UF200 course themes here.

UF 200-028 Foundations of Ethics and Diversity

Class # 11365, Mo 3:00-4:15pm, Jordan A/Hybrid, Stephanie Capaldo

Engages students in discussion of ethics and diversity in contemporary societal issues. Courses include writing assignments and an experiential learning component. Topics may vary each time the course is taught. PREREQ: ENGL 102, UF 100, and sophomore status. Find more information about this and the other UF200 course themes here.

Other Honors Courses

HONORS 198-001 Honors Seminar (1 Credit)

Class # 11412, We 9:00-10:15am, Sarah Lausch

This course assists students in preparing for success in the Honors College at Boise State University. An interactive approach is utilized to encourage students to develop positive relationships in the classroom with other Honors students as well as to help acclimate students to expectations the Honors College, Boise State University, and beyond will have of them.  This class is required for all Honors students who have been admitted for the spring semester. 

HONORS 298-001 Honors Seminar: Leadership (1 Credit)

Class # 10736,  Mo 3:00-4:15pm, EDUC 109, Chris Hyer

*NOTES: Course is restricted to Honors Student Association officers. Students need the permission of the instructor to enroll in this class.

HONORS 298-002 Honors Seminar: Leadership Practice (1 Credit)

Class # 12733, Mo 4:30-5:45pm, Chris Hyer

*NOTES: Course is restricted to Honors House officers. Students need instructor permission to enroll in this class.

HONORS 390-001 Crafting Professional Narratives (1 Credit)

Class # 12736, 01/11/21-02/26/21, REMOTE,  Emily Jones, Shelton Woods, Brandi Venable

This one-credit, seven-week course refines students’ writing and speaking skills while challenging them to carefully consider their pathway through college and their steps after graduation. The course will cover diverse forms of written and oral communication, including essays, proposals/grants, personal statements, and presentations. What each topic has in common is the need to persuade its intended audience in a polished yet accessible manner.

*NOTES: This course is a (1st) 7-week course and runs from 01/11/21-02/26/21. This course is exclusively for students with upper-division standing who are 1 to 4 semesters from graduation. 

REQUIREMENTS:  This section is a 7-week, fully remote course with both synchronous (live) and asynchronous (self-paced) work. Attendance is mandatory for the entirety of the live, synchronous sessions on Friday, February 5 from 1:30-8:30pm and Saturday, February 6 from 9:00am-4:00pm. The live sessions will take place over Zoom. The online, self-paced work will be submitted via Blackboard. 

HONORS 390-4001 Crafting Professional Narratives (1 Credit)

Class # 13674, 03/08/21-04/30/21, ONLINE, Emily Jones

This one-credit, seven-week online course refines students’ writing and speaking skills while challenging them to carefully consider their pathway through college and their steps after graduation. The course will cover diverse forms of written and oral communication, including essays, proposals/grants, personal statements, and presentations. What each topic has in common is the need to persuade its intended audience in a polished yet accessible manner. 

*NOTES: This is a (2nd) 7-week course and runs from 03/08/21-04/30/21. This course is exclusively for students with upper-division standing who are 1-4 semesters from graduation. 

REQUIREMENTS: Excellent time management and computer/Internet literacy skills. Regular access to a computer with reliable/high-speed Internet access. For courses lasting 5-7 weeks, expect to spend between 5.5-9 hours per credit each week on classwork and interacting with students and instructor. Read course introduction email sent from the instructor to your BroncoMail account by the first day of class. 

Honors Colloquia

HONORS 392-001 Reading Cultures

Class # 13658, TuTh 12:00-1:15pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Annal Frenz

This course considers how written and visual narratives express cultural ideologies and how we evaluate or “read” culture/s through stories and storytelling. We’ll be looking at how our own culture influences our narratives (both verbal and visual) and how we make meaning out of other cultures’ narratives (both verbal and visual). Writing is a crucial element of this course as is reading in the traditional sense of the word, but we’ll also be interacting with a variety of media.  

HONORS 392-003 Learning and Cognition

Class # 13660, WeFr 1:30-2:45pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Chris Hyer and Sarah Lausch

Have you ever thought about how we learn and store knowledge? Perhaps why you struggle to remember something on a test after reading it the night before? This course is focused on understanding how people learn throughout their lifespan (child through adult).  We will use an interactive approach to examine historic and contemporary theories and explanations of human learning and relate them to past and current models.  

HONORS 392-004 Stitches of Resistance

Class # 13661, TuTh 1:30-2:45pm, REMOTE/ONLINE, Julianne Wenner

Throughout history, people have used craft and needlework as a form of activism. These creative projects have been used to voice resistance, raise awareness, fill a need that typically goes unfilled, or – more recently – to oppose the fast-paced materialism of the 21st century. This course will explore different social movements and the needlework-related crafts people have employed to express themselves in relation to these movements. The course will culminate in individual craftivism projects.  

NOTE: This course will be a remote/online course with both synchronous and asynchronous meetings.

HONORS 392-005 Filmmakers Past and Present

Class # 13662, Tu 6:00-8:45pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Anne Allen

This course offers a study of select past and current filmmakers with a focus on issues of authorship, aesthetics and worldview as represented over a body of film work. Biographical, socio-cultural, economic, political, and technological factors contributing to the films of select filmmakers will be examined.  

HONORS 392-006 Media, Culture, and Politics

Class # 13663, MoWe 3:00-4:15pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Rick Moore

Whether we want to admit it or not, much of what we think about controversial issues is greatly shaped by what we have read in newspapers, heard in popular music, or seen in motion pictures. In this class we will consider the various media forces that make contemporary politics different from that of the past, and consider the extent to which our digitized democracy is healthy and truly represents the will of the people.  

HONORS 392-007 Compelling Writing through Fellowship Apps

Class # 13687, We 4:30-7:15pm, Honors College Rm 165, Kate Huebschmann

We know good writing when we read it, but what makes it that way? Is there a magic formula to follow? Is it all luck? These questions are even more pressing in high-stakes writing contexts such as fellowship applications. How, in 2-3 pages, do you encapsulate your life story and convince a stranger you’re the perfect candidate for an award? This intensive writing course will examine these questions by guiding you through the application process for a fully funded year of study, research, or English teaching abroad through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. The application you complete during this course will be submitted in Oct. of 2021.

*NOTES: Instructor consent is required. You must graduate no later than spring 2022 to meet Fulbright eligibility requirements and enroll in this course.  

HONORS 392-008 The Legal History of Sports

Class # 13703, We 6:00-8:45pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Christopher Graham

This Seminar will explore the interaction between the law and American professional and amateur sports from a historical perspective.  It will also examine how landmark court decisions have dramatically affected the landscape of American violence, gambling, amateurism, civil rights, and Title IX.

HONORS 392-009 The Bloody Code: Crime and Punishment in Eighteenth-Century England

Class # 14797, MoWe 1:30-2:45pm, Ann Campbell

This seminar will examine historical, artistic, legal, and literary accounts of crime and punishment at a time and place so notorious for its draconian punishments of criminals that its legal statutes are now referred to as the “bloody code.” Public hangings, gangs of criminals and pickpockets in the London streets, and ballads about criminals sold and sung on street corners kept crime and criminals at the forefront of the eighteenth-century urban mind. While the course focuses on crime and punishment in the eighteenth century, the questions we address about individual versus collective culpability for crime, the meaning of justice, and the purpose of punishment are as relevant now as they were then. 

HONORS 392-010 Life & Works of Sayers/Lewis

Class # 14799, MoWe 12:00-1:15pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Shelton Woods

Dorothy Sayers and C.S. Lewis were influential literary figures in the twentieth century; they were also close friends. We will examine their lives, study their writings, and work to make our own writings concise, clear, and engaging.

HONORS 392-011 Democracy and its Critics

Class # 14800, Mo 6:00-8:45pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Luke Mayville

Democracy is defined, most simply, as political power (kratos) wielded by the people (demos). As such, democracy is cherished across the globe as an essential feature of any civilized, humane society. And yet, for most of its history, democracy has been the object of harsh and relentless criticism. The great philosophers of ancient Athens, the founders of the United States, and a long list of other revered political theorists have judged democracy to be impractical at best and tyrannical at worst. This course will explore the writings of some of democracy’s most trenchant critics (including Plato, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Joseph Schumpeter, and Walter Lippmann) along with the writings of some of democracy’s most compelling theorists and proponents (including Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Alexis De Tocqueville, W.E.B. Du Bois, John Dewey, Carol Pateman, and Theda Skocpol). Students will develop and refine their judgments about democracy by considering challenging questions such as: Do ordinary citizens possess the qualities of mind and character to wield political power responsibly? Is the United States too democratic or not democratic enough? 

HONORS 392-012 Apocalypse! Seeking the Truth about Violence and Religion

Class # 14827, TuTh 9:00-10:15am, Honors College Rm 166/167, Stewart Gardner

We live in apocalyptic times. This word–apocalypse–comes to us from a religious context. It means both the utter destruction of the world, and also the revelation of something hidden, bringing the truth out into the light. What is the truth about religion and violence? In this class we will begin by considering the case against religion with regard to violence, from early modern thinkers to the “New Atheists” of today. We will then turn to alternative explanations of the relation between violence and religion.  

HONORS 392-013 The Idaho Basque Challenge

Class # 15907, Th 9:00-11:45am, Honors College Rm 165, Nic Miller

The Idaho Basque Challenge (IBC) is for students with a desire to learn how to harness the power of business to create a positive social impact in the world. Students will have the opportunity to work on interdisciplinary and international teams with counterparts in the Basque Country as they form a social venture to address challenges in the world. Students from all backgrounds and academic affiliations will be necessary for this course, as the interdisciplinary aspect of it will make the experience richer for all students.

Honors Graduation Tracks – Senior Capstone Options

HONORS 498-001 Honors Seminar (1 Credit)

Class # 13665, TuTh 12:00-1:15pm, Honors College Rm 165,  Brandi Venable

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for Senior students who plan to graduate either this semester or next.
*NOTE: This course is a (1st) 7-week course and runs from 01/11/21-02/26/21.

HONORS 498-002 Honors Seminar (1 Credit)

Class # 13666, WeFr 10:30-11:45am, REMOTE, Chris Hyer

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for Senior students who plan to graduate either this semester or next.
*NOTE: This course is a (1st) 7-week course and runs from 01/11/21-02/26/21.

HONORS 498-003 Honors Seminar (1 Credit)

Class # 13667, TuTh 4:30-5:45pm, Honors College Rm 166/167, Annal Frenz

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for Senior students who plan to graduate either this semester or next.
*NOTE: This course is a (2nd) 7-week course and runs from 03/08/21-04/30/21.

HONORS 498-004 Honors Seminar (1 Credit)

Class # 13668, TuTh 10:30-11:45am, REMOTE, Andrew Finstuen

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. The course is designed for Senior students who plan to graduate either this semester or next.
*NOTE: This course is a (2nd) 7-week course and runs from 03/08/21-04/30/21.

HONORS 498-4001 Honors Seminar (1 Credit)

Class # 11852, ONLINE, Michal Temkin Martinez

This course provides a capstone experience for Honors seniors by asking them to reflect on their education at Boise State and by assisting their transition into the world beyond the University and the Honors College. This version of the course will be conducted fully online using the Blackboard course management system. The course takes place over seven weeks. You will complete two modules per week. You can plan on spending about 3 hours working on each module. The course is designed for Senior students who plan to graduate either this semester or next.

*NOTE:  This course is a (1st) 7-Week course and runs from 01/11/21-02/26/21. 

ONLINE REQUIREMENTS: Excellent time management and computer/Internet literacy skills. Regular access to a computer with reliable/high-speed Internet access. Read the course introduction email sent from the instructor to your BroncoMail account by the first day of class.