Faculty and Staff

Department Chair

  • Hampshire_Patricia

    Patricia Hampshire, PH.D.

    Interim Department Chair, Associate Professor

    Dr. Patricia Hampshire is the Department Chair and associate professor in Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Hampshire received her PhD in Special Education at Indiana University. Dr. Hampshire teaches courses focused on early intervention, collaborating with families, child development and working with students with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Hampshire’s areas of expertise include early childhood special education, developing family-focused interventions, autism spectrum disorders, and working with individuals with severe behavior. Dr. Hampshire has worked in both the educational and clinical settings as a special education teacher, parent coach, consultant and researcher. Dr. Hampshire’s current research focuses on teaching student with autism to self-manage during homework routines through the use of iPads. Dr. Hampshire’s work has been included in Teaching Exceptional Children, Intervention in School and Clinic, and Beyond Behavior.

    Dr. Patricia Hampshire is the Department Chair and associate professor in Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Hampshire received her PhD in Special Education at Indiana University. Dr. Hampshire teaches courses focused on early intervention, collaborating with families, child development and working with students with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Hampshire’s areas of expertise include early childhood special education, developing family-focused interventions, autism spectrum disorders, and working with individuals with severe behavior. Dr. Hampshire has worked in both the educational and clinical settings as a special education teacher, parent coach, consultant and researcher. Dr. Hampshire’s current research focuses on teaching student with autism to self-manage during homework routines through the use of iPads. Dr. Hampshire’s work has been included in Teaching Exceptional Children, Intervention in School and Clinic, and Beyond Behavior.

Faculty

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    Lisa Beymer EdD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, MIT Program Coordinator

    Lisa Beymer, EdD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor and MIT Coordinator for the Early & Special Education Department. Lisa’s teaching for the department focuses on exceptionalities in the classroom and school, evidence-based instructional practices for students with disabilities, and diagnostic assessment use and analysis. Lisa also works as a University Liaison for the College of Education, supervising pre-service teacher candidates who are completing their final student teaching experiences in the general and special education classrooms. In her role as MIT Coordinator, Lisa also advises and supervises all students seeking to gain initial teaching certification through our fully-online MIT program. Here, she supports students from application to graduation, as well as leads a group of faculty members in the supervision of these teacher candidates during their final teaching experiences. As a part of the larger Boise State community, Lisa is co-Advisor for the Teacher Education Ambassador student club which is housed in the College of Education. Lisa’s research interests include effectiveness of online teacher candidate supervision, special education teacher preparation, impact of supervisor-candidate relationship in teacher candidate development, student-led IEPs at the elementary and secondary level, and evidence-based practices for students with disabilities.

    Lisa Beymer, EdD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor and MIT Coordinator for the Early & Special Education Department. Lisa’s teaching for the department focuses on exceptionalities in the classroom and school, evidence-based instructional practices for students with disabilities, and diagnostic assessment use and analysis. Lisa also works as a University Liaison for the College of Education, supervising pre-service teacher candidates who are completing their final student teaching experiences in the general and special education classrooms. In her role as MIT Coordinator, Lisa also advises and supervises all students seeking to gain initial teaching certification through our fully-online MIT program. Here, she supports students from application to graduation, as well as leads a group of faculty members in the supervision of these teacher candidates during their final teaching experiences. As a part of the larger Boise State community, Lisa is co-Advisor for the Teacher Education Ambassador student club which is housed in the College of Education. Lisa’s research interests include effectiveness of online teacher candidate supervision, special education teacher preparation, impact of supervisor-candidate relationship in teacher candidate development, student-led IEPs at the elementary and secondary level, and evidence-based practices for students with disabilities.

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    Deb Carter, PhD, BCBA-D

    Interim Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, Professor

    Deborah Carter, PhD, BCBA-D, is the Interim Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of Education and a Professor in Early and Special Education at Boise State University. Dr. Carter’s areas of expertise include school-wide and individual student positive behavior support, social-emotional development, and nature-based learning. She provides training and coaching support to early childhood programs and K-12 schools implementing systems of positive behavior support. Her current research focuses on implementation of program-wide positive behavior support in early childhood and integrating social-emotional learning and environmental education. Her work has been included in the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, Behavioral Disorders, Assessment for Effective Intervention, Intervention in School and Clinic, The Early Childhood Education Journal, Teaching Young Children, and International Journal of Early Childhood Environmental Education.

    Deborah Carter, PhD, BCBA-D, is the Interim Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of Education and a Professor in Early and Special Education at Boise State University. Dr. Carter’s areas of expertise include school-wide and individual student positive behavior support, social-emotional development, and nature-based learning. She provides training and coaching support to early childhood programs and K-12 schools implementing systems of positive behavior support. Her current research focuses on implementation of program-wide positive behavior support in early childhood and integrating social-emotional learning and environmental education. Her work has been included in the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, Behavioral Disorders, Assessment for Effective Intervention, Intervention in School and Clinic, The Early Childhood Education Journal, Teaching Young Children, and International Journal of Early Childhood Environmental Education.

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    Jeremy W. Ford, PhD, NCSP

    Assistant Professor, MEd and Certificate Programs Coordinator

    Jeremy W. Ford, PhD, NCSP, is an assistant professor in the Early & Special Education Department Boise State University. Dr. Ford is a specialist-level trained, and nationally certified, school psychologist. Prior to joining the faculty at Boise State University, he earned his Ph.D. in Teaching and Learning (Special Education subtrack) from The University of Iowa with an emphasis in School Curriculum and Assessment Policy. Dr. Ford has experience working in schools in multiple capacities across kindergarten through high school. These experiences include: crisis intervention at an alternative school, teacher assistant for students with intellectual disabilities, school psychologist, professional development trainer, technical assistance provider, and consultant for students with autism.

    Dr. Ford’s research interests include: Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM), examining special education teacher effectiveness, explicit instruction, noncategorical models of special education service delivery, Response to Intervention (RtI) / Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS), and screening and progress decision-making. His work has been included in Education and Training in Autism and other Developmental Disabilities and The Journal of Remedial and Special Education. He lives in Boise with his wife, Rachel, and their four sons.

    Jeremy W. Ford, PhD, NCSP, is an assistant professor in the Early & Special Education Department Boise State University. Dr. Ford is a specialist-level trained, and nationally certified, school psychologist. Prior to joining the faculty at Boise State University, he earned his Ph.D. in Teaching and Learning (Special Education subtrack) from The University of Iowa with an emphasis in School Curriculum and Assessment Policy. Dr. Ford has experience working in schools in multiple capacities across kindergarten through high school. These experiences include: crisis intervention at an alternative school, teacher assistant for students with intellectual disabilities, school psychologist, professional development trainer, technical assistance provider, and consultant for students with autism.

    Dr. Ford’s research interests include: Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM), examining special education teacher effectiveness, explicit instruction, noncategorical models of special education service delivery, Response to Intervention (RtI) / Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS), and screening and progress decision-making. His work has been included in Education and Training in Autism and other Developmental Disabilities and The Journal of Remedial and Special Education. He lives in Boise with his wife, Rachel, and their four sons.

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    Michael Humphrey, EdD

    Associate Professor

    Michael Humphrey, EdD, is an associate professor in Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Humphrey received his BA in English from the University of Iowa in 1997 and then served in the Peace Corps in Sri Lanka and Cameroon till 2000. He received his MA in Special Education in 2004 and his EdD in Special Education in 2008 from the University of Northern Colorado. His current research focuses on building teacher-efficacy in inclusive classrooms, preparing teachers to work with culturally and linguistically diverse populations, and improving teacher retention. Dr. Humphrey’s work has been included in Exceptionality, A Special Education Journal, Journal of Post-secondary Education and Disability, Learning Disability Quarterly, The Clearing House, and, Rural Special Education Quarterly.

    Michael Humphrey, EdD, is an associate professor in Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Humphrey received his BA in English from the University of Iowa in 1997 and then served in the Peace Corps in Sri Lanka and Cameroon till 2000. He received his MA in Special Education in 2004 and his EdD in Special Education in 2008 from the University of Northern Colorado. His current research focuses on building teacher-efficacy in inclusive classrooms, preparing teachers to work with culturally and linguistically diverse populations, and improving teacher retention. Dr. Humphrey’s work has been included in Exceptionality, A Special Education Journal, Journal of Post-secondary Education and Disability, Learning Disability Quarterly, The Clearing House, and, Rural Special Education Quarterly.

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    Evelyn Johnson, EdD

    Professor

    Evelyn received her Doctor of Education degree from the University of Washington, Seattle in 1999 and holds the position of Professor of Special Education, and Executive Director of Lee Pesky Learning Center, a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities.

    From 2003 to 2007, Dr. Johnson worked as a research associate for the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD), examining issues related to Response to Intervention (RTI) and Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) determination. Dr. Johnson’s work with the NRCLD includes the development of numerous technical assistance products to assist state and local educational agencies on Response to Intervention (RTI) and learning disability identification-related issues. This work has led to numerous collaborative research efforts, national presentations, and publications including co-authoring, RTI: A Practitioner’s Guide to Implementation and How RTI Works in Secondary Schools.

    Dr. Johnson’s current research focuses in three main areas: 1) understanding the connection between information processing, executive functioning, and academic performance, 2) supporting schools in the implementation of intervention and instructional systems for students at-risk for or with learning difficulties, and 3) special education teacher evaluation. Dr. Johnson joined Boise State University in 2007, and lives in Boise with her husband and two children.

    Evelyn received her Doctor of Education degree from the University of Washington, Seattle in 1999 and holds the position of Professor of Special Education, and Executive Director of Lee Pesky Learning Center, a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities.

    From 2003 to 2007, Dr. Johnson worked as a research associate for the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD), examining issues related to Response to Intervention (RTI) and Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) determination. Dr. Johnson’s work with the NRCLD includes the development of numerous technical assistance products to assist state and local educational agencies on Response to Intervention (RTI) and learning disability identification-related issues. This work has led to numerous collaborative research efforts, national presentations, and publications including co-authoring, RTI: A Practitioner’s Guide to Implementation and How RTI Works in Secondary Schools.

    Dr. Johnson’s current research focuses in three main areas: 1) understanding the connection between information processing, executive functioning, and academic performance, 2) supporting schools in the implementation of intervention and instructional systems for students at-risk for or with learning difficulties, and 3) special education teacher evaluation. Dr. Johnson joined Boise State University in 2007, and lives in Boise with her husband and two children.

  • Nichole Moos portrait

    Nichole Moos, MA

    Assistant Clinical Instructor

    Nichole Moos is a Clinical Instructor in the Early and Special Education Department at Boise State University. In addition to teaching, Nichole helps to manage the Idaho STEM Action Center Grant at the Boise State University Children’s Center. She received her MA from West Virginia University in Early Childhood Education and is a National Board Certified Early Childhood Generalist. Nichole has taught in early childhood classrooms across the United States the last 13 years. During this time she engaged in action research around incorporating the principles and values from the schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, emergent curriculum, and authentic, child directed play. She has presented at Early Childhood Conferences throughout Idaho on creating teacher framed and child led classrooms.
    Education Building, Room 217
    Nichole Moos is a Clinical Instructor in the Early and Special Education Department at Boise State University. In addition to teaching, Nichole helps to manage the Idaho STEM Action Center Grant at the Boise State University Children’s Center. She received her MA from West Virginia University in Early Childhood Education and is a National Board Certified Early Childhood Generalist. Nichole has taught in early childhood classrooms across the United States the last 13 years. During this time she engaged in action research around incorporating the principles and values from the schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, emergent curriculum, and authentic, child directed play. She has presented at Early Childhood Conferences throughout Idaho on creating teacher framed and child led classrooms.
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    Gena Nelson, PhD

    Assistant Professor

    Gena Nelson, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Nelson received her MA in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in School Psychology and her PhD in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Special Education from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Nelson has experience working with students with disabilities and their families in various capacities across preschool through high school including: high school special education teacher, early childhood caregiver support, professional development trainer, and technical assistance provider. Her current research focuses on early math interventions for students with disabilities and students who are at risk, long-term outcomes for students with math learning disabilities and difficulties, and building teacher knowledge and use of evidence-based practices. Dr. Nelson’s work has been included in the Journal for Learning Disabilities, Assessment for Effective Intervention, and The Elementary School Journal.

    Gena Nelson, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Nelson received her MA in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in School Psychology and her PhD in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Special Education from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Nelson has experience working with students with disabilities and their families in various capacities across preschool through high school including: high school special education teacher, early childhood caregiver support, professional development trainer, and technical assistance provider. Her current research focuses on early math interventions for students with disabilities and students who are at risk, long-term outcomes for students with math learning disabilities and difficulties, and building teacher knowledge and use of evidence-based practices. Dr. Nelson’s work has been included in the Journal for Learning Disabilities, Assessment for Effective Intervention, and The Elementary School Journal.

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    Juli Pool, PhD.

    Associate Professor, Undergraduate Degree Programs Coordinator

    Juli Lull Pool, PhD., is an associate professor in Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Pool received her doctorate in Early Intervention from the University of Oregon. She also holds an MS in Early Intervention from the University of Oregon, and a BS in Elementary and Special Education from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Pool’s areas of expertise include assessment, response to intervention, and early childhood special education. She has published in several professional journals including Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, Early Childhood Education Journal, Intervention in School & Clinic, and Assessment for Effective Intervention.

    Juli Lull Pool, PhD., is an associate professor in Early & Special Education Department at Boise State University. Dr. Pool received her doctorate in Early Intervention from the University of Oregon. She also holds an MS in Early Intervention from the University of Oregon, and a BS in Elementary and Special Education from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Pool’s areas of expertise include assessment, response to intervention, and early childhood special education. She has published in several professional journals including Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, Early Childhood Education Journal, Intervention in School & Clinic, and Assessment for Effective Intervention.

Graduate Assistants

  • Amanda Hobb portrait

    Sydney Cosso

  • Michael Crawford portrait

    Michael Crawford

  • kevalynn drake

    Kevallyn Drake

  • Sydney Cosso portrait

    Amanda Hobb

  • Patrick Mallory portrait

    Patrick Mallory

  • Connor Maloney portrait

    Connor Maloney

  • Gurupriya Ramanathan

  • Mali Sawyer portrait

    Mali Sawyer

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