Lab for Ecohydrology Applications and Forecasting

People

Current Researchers

  • Flores_Headshot

    Alejandro (Lejo) Flores, PH.D.

    Principal Investigator and Lab Director

    • B.S. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University (2001)
    • M.S. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University (2003)
    • Ph.D. Hydrology, MIT (2009)

    Lejo Flores is the Principal Investigator and director of the LEAF group. A computational ecohydrologist by training, Lejo is passionate about using advancing computational tools and techniques to understand integrated land systems where human activity is inextricably coupled to hydrologic, ecologic, and atmospheric processes across a range of spatiotemporal scales. Of particular interest are the local, regional and global teleconnections between water, food, and energy networks.

    • B.S. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University (2001)
    • M.S. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University (2003)
    • Ph.D. Hydrology, MIT (2009)

    Lejo Flores is the Principal Investigator and director of the LEAF group. A computational ecohydrologist by training, Lejo is passionate about using advancing computational tools and techniques to understand integrated land systems where human activity is inextricably coupled to hydrologic, ecologic, and atmospheric processes across a range of spatiotemporal scales. Of particular interest are the local, regional and global teleconnections between water, food, and energy networks.

  • Chen_Headshot

    Chao Chen, PH.D.

    Postdoctoral Researcher

    • B.S. Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, China (2009)
    • M.S. Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, China (2012)
    • Ph.D. Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (2017)

    Chao is a hydrologist and engineer interested in hydrologic modeling, water resources management, and hydraulic engineering. Her current research explores the interactions of surface and subsurface heterogeneity through integrated hydrologic models. This project is a part of the NSF Critical Zone Observatory (CZO).

    • B.S. Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, China (2009)
    • M.S. Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, China (2012)
    • Ph.D. Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (2017)

    Chao is a hydrologist and engineer interested in hydrologic modeling, water resources management, and hydraulic engineering. Her current research explores the interactions of surface and subsurface heterogeneity through integrated hydrologic models. This project is a part of the NSF Critical Zone Observatory (CZO).

  • Kaiser_Headshot

    Kendra Kaiser, PH.D.

    Postdoctoral Researcher

    • B.S. Soil & Water Science, and Environmental Biology, Montana State University (2011)
    • Ph.D. Water Hydrology and Biogeochemistry, Duke University (2017)

    Kendra is a watershed hydrologist interested in landscape ecology, remote sensing, and coupling of field and modeling techniques to examine social – ecological systems. Her current research is developing agent based models to examine how land use change and water management decisions affect local to regional scale water resources. This project is a component of the PNNL Integrated Multi-sector, Multi-scale Modeling (IM3) project.

    • B.S. Soil & Water Science, and Environmental Biology, Montana State University (2011)
    • Ph.D. Water Hydrology and Biogeochemistry, Duke University (2017)

    Kendra is a watershed hydrologist interested in landscape ecology, remote sensing, and coupling of field and modeling techniques to examine social – ecological systems. Her current research is developing agent based models to examine how land use change and water management decisions affect local to regional scale water resources. This project is a component of the PNNL Integrated Multi-sector, Multi-scale Modeling (IM3) project.

  • Nash_Headshot

    Caroline Nash, PH.D.

    Postdoctoral Researcher

    • B.A. Environmental Studies, Yale University (2011)
    • B.S. Geology, Oregon State University (2017)
    • Ph.D. Water Resources Engineering, Oregon State University (2018)

    Caroline is a geomorphologist and hydrologist interested controls on water availability and how landscapes evolve as water availability changes. Her current research is using field data and modelling-derived variables to investigate how climate and topography influence the distribution of plant communities in the headwaters of the Colorado River. This research is part of the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program.

    • B.A. Environmental Studies, Yale University (2011)
    • B.S. Geology, Oregon State University (2017)
    • Ph.D. Water Resources Engineering, Oregon State University (2018)

    Caroline is a geomorphologist and hydrologist interested controls on water availability and how landscapes evolve as water availability changes. Her current research is using field data and modelling-derived variables to investigate how climate and topography influence the distribution of plant communities in the headwaters of the Colorado River. This research is part of the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program.

  • Pandit_Headshot

    Karun Pandit, PH.D.

    Postdoctoral Researcher

    • B.S. Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Nepal (2001)
    • M.S. Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Nepal (2003)
    • Ph.D. Monitoring, Analysis & Modeling, State University of New York (2016)

    Karun is a biometrician and terrestrial ecosystem modeler, interested in vegetation dynamics, land cover changes, and ecosystem fluxes coupled with human activities and climate extremes. He has experience in growth and yield modeling, dynamic vegetation modeling, spatial statistics, GIS, and remote sensing. His current project is about assessing the effects of restoration techniques and alternate climate scenarios on sagebrush ecosystems of Great Basin, by applying Ecosystem Demography (ED2.1) model, using WRF data, and remote sensing data.

    • B.S. Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Nepal (2001)
    • M.S. Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Nepal (2003)
    • Ph.D. Monitoring, Analysis & Modeling, State University of New York (2016)

    Karun is a biometrician and terrestrial ecosystem modeler, interested in vegetation dynamics, land cover changes, and ecosystem fluxes coupled with human activities and climate extremes. He has experience in growth and yield modeling, dynamic vegetation modeling, spatial statistics, GIS, and remote sensing. His current project is about assessing the effects of restoration techniques and alternate climate scenarios on sagebrush ecosystems of Great Basin, by applying Ecosystem Demography (ED2.1) model, using WRF data, and remote sensing data.

  • Murenbeeld_Headshot

    Katie Murenbeeld

    PH.D. Student

    • B.S. Geology, University of Georgia (2007)
    • M.S. Geoscience, University of Arizona (2012)

    After 6 years as a geologist in the mining industry, Katie returned to graduate school to pursue her interests in hydrology and forest ecology. Her current project is focused on the impact of administrative timelines and management practices on ecohydrological processes. This research is a part of the NSF CAREER: Citizens, Conservation, and Climate: Research and Education for Climate Literacy in Managed Landscapes project.

    • B.S. Geology, University of Georgia (2007)
    • M.S. Geoscience, University of Arizona (2012)

    After 6 years as a geologist in the mining industry, Katie returned to graduate school to pursue her interests in hydrology and forest ecology. Her current project is focused on the impact of administrative timelines and management practices on ecohydrological processes. This research is a part of the NSF CAREER: Citizens, Conservation, and Climate: Research and Education for Climate Literacy in Managed Landscapes project.

  • LEAF Alumni

    Will Rudisill

    PH.D. Student

    • B.S. Geology, UNC Chapel Hill (2015)
    • M.S. Hydrologic Science, Boise State University (2018)

    Will studies hydrologic processes in mountainous, snow dominated watersheds. His current research use the WRF regional climate model to study snow accumulation, melt, and interactions with critical zone processes in watersheds. This research is part of the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program.

    • B.S. Geology, UNC Chapel Hill (2015)
    • M.S. Hydrologic Science, Boise State University (2018)

    Will studies hydrologic processes in mountainous, snow dominated watersheds. His current research use the WRF regional climate model to study snow accumulation, melt, and interactions with critical zone processes in watersheds. This research is part of the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program.

  • Becker_Headshot

    Charlie Becker

    M.S. Student

    • B.S. Meteorology, Metropolitan State University of Denver (2017)

    Charlie’s primary interests are in synoptic scale climate variation and its effect on regional weather events.  Currently, he’s working on a project for the Idaho Department of Agriculture characterizing climate trends in the Snake River Valley American Viticultural Area and producing seasonal forecasts of conditions that may be harmful to local vineyards.

    • B.S. Meteorology, Metropolitan State University of Denver (2017)

    Charlie’s primary interests are in synoptic scale climate variation and its effect on regional weather events.  Currently, he’s working on a project for the Idaho Department of Agriculture characterizing climate trends in the Snake River Valley American Viticultural Area and producing seasonal forecasts of conditions that may be harmful to local vineyards.

  • Vincent_Headshot

    Allison Vincent

    M.S. Student

    • B.S. Environmental Science, Iowa State University (2013)

    Allison is a hydrologist interested in relationships between how changes in climate and land cover affect water quality and availability. Her current project uses remote sensing to investigate how topography and land cover affect snowpack in the central Colorado mountains. This research is part of the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program.

    • B.S. Environmental Science, Iowa State University (2013)

    Allison is a hydrologist interested in relationships between how changes in climate and land cover affect water quality and availability. Her current project uses remote sensing to investigate how topography and land cover affect snowpack in the central Colorado mountains. This research is part of the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program.

Current Researchers

Current Researchers

LEAF Alumni

LEAF Alumni

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