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Event Series Event Series: Rosalie Sorrels Exhibit

Rosalie Sorrels Exhibit

June 10, 2023

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s Albertsons Library through the end of August. Sorrels’ life, music, photographs and notes are part of the Idaho Folklife Collection, a collaboration between the library’s Special Collections and Archives and the Idaho Commission on the Arts. NPR ran an interview shortly after Sorrels’ death in 2017: “Rosalie always considered herself a singer more than a songwriter…She treasured traditional folklore and made her first professional reputation singing songs she had collected in Utah and Idaho, but would also tell of late-night dinners cooked for Count Basie’s musicians when they came through Salt Lake. She liked any music that related directly to people’s lives.”

photo of Rosalie Sorrels holding a guitar
photo courtesy of Philip Barlow, Backbeat Photos

Visit the Rosalie Sorrels exhibit at Boise State’s