Faculty

Faculty and Staff

  • R. Eric Landrum

    Professor and Department Chair

  • Cynthia G. Campbell

    Associate Professor and Associate Chair

    Dr. Campbell is a first-generation college graduate who started a family and worked in several industries before returning to school to complete her degrees. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from The Pennsylvania State University in 2010, her Master’s degree in Developmental Psychology, a BS in psychology, and a BS in business administration, As an undergraduate, Dr. Campbell participated in teaching and research opportunities and found her passion studying human relationships — how they influence the way we view ourselves, others, and the world around us. Since earning her Ph.D., Dr. Campbell has taught for three different universities, published in the family science and in the scholarship of teaching and learning, and consulted on community grant projects. Dr. Campbell is dedicated to thinking carefully about and planning for the future needs of her students and the university. She uses evidence-based collaborative learning methods in her classes and seeks out opportunities to mentor undergraduate students

    Dr. Campbell is a first-generation college graduate who started a family and worked in several industries before returning to school to complete her degrees. She earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from The Pennsylvania State University in 2010, her Master’s degree in Developmental Psychology, a BS in psychology, and a BS in business administration, As an undergraduate, Dr. Campbell participated in teaching and research opportunities and found her passion studying human relationships — how they influence the way we view ourselves, others, and the world around us. Since earning her Ph.D., Dr. Campbell has taught for three different universities, published in the family science and in the scholarship of teaching and learning, and consulted on community grant projects. Dr. Campbell is dedicated to thinking carefully about and planning for the future needs of her students and the university. She uses evidence-based collaborative learning methods in her classes and seeks out opportunities to mentor undergraduate students

  • Babik

    Iryna Babik

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Iryna Babik is a developmental psychologist with extensive expertise in developmental research methodology and statistical data analysis. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2014, conducted post-doctoral research in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, and joined the Boise State University in 2019. Her research focuses on cognitive development in infancy/childhood; the role of sensorimotor exploration in problem-solving and cognitive development; development of visuospatial skills, drawing, and early writing; development of executive functioning and mathematical ability; cultural aspects of information processing and cognitive development; early intervention and rehabilitation of sensorimotor and cognitive skills.

    Dr. Iryna Babik is a developmental psychologist with extensive expertise in developmental research methodology and statistical data analysis. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2014, conducted post-doctoral research in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, and joined the Boise State University in 2019. Her research focuses on cognitive development in infancy/childhood; the role of sensorimotor exploration in problem-solving and cognitive development; development of visuospatial skills, drawing, and early writing; development of executive functioning and mathematical ability; cultural aspects of information processing and cognitive development; early intervention and rehabilitation of sensorimotor and cognitive skills.

  • Genuchi

    Matthew Genuchi, Ph.D

    Associate Professor of Psychological Science

    Dr. Genuchi has been with the department of psychological science since 2011. Since his formative time as an undergraduate, working with Dr. Gary Brooks at Baylor University, Dr. Genuchi has been intrigued by questions and issues surrounding the psychology of men and masculinities. His research interests have primarily focused on understanding how conformity to masculine norms impacts men’s experiences of depression and negative affect. Additionally, Dr. Genuchi is concerned about the high rates of suicide death in men worldwide, and he is conducting research to further examine the ability of gendered symptoms of depression to predict suicide risk in various populations of men. He completed his doctoral training in the APA-accredited counseling psychology program at the University of Denver, as well as his APA-accredited doctoral internship at the University of Idaho Counseling and Testing Center. Dr. Genuchi is a licensed psychologist in the state of Idaho (PSY-202648). While Dr. Genuchi loves to work with students, teach, and think about his research, he also enjoys some down time. For fun, you’ll find him spending time with his family, reading, gardening, traveling, taking evening runs, and enjoying afternoon naps.

    Dr. Genuchi has been with the department of psychological science since 2011. Since his formative time as an undergraduate, working with Dr. Gary Brooks at Baylor University, Dr. Genuchi has been intrigued by questions and issues surrounding the psychology of men and masculinities. His research interests have primarily focused on understanding how conformity to masculine norms impacts men’s experiences of depression and negative affect. Additionally, Dr. Genuchi is concerned about the high rates of suicide death in men worldwide, and he is conducting research to further examine the ability of gendered symptoms of depression to predict suicide risk in various populations of men. He completed his doctoral training in the APA-accredited counseling psychology program at the University of Denver, as well as his APA-accredited doctoral internship at the University of Idaho Counseling and Testing Center. Dr. Genuchi is a licensed psychologist in the state of Idaho (PSY-202648). While Dr. Genuchi loves to work with students, teach, and think about his research, he also enjoys some down time. For fun, you’ll find him spending time with his family, reading, gardening, traveling, taking evening runs, and enjoying afternoon naps.

  • Henderson

    Kimberly Henderson

    Lecturer

    When most people see that I am a Developmental Psychologist that say “oh she must study children”. Nope, I don’t. I am currently working on looking at the chaos that comes through the changes associated with significant transitions in life. One such transitions is the one that the majority of the students I am working with are making right now, the transition to adulthood. While I do not have an active research lab, the majority of my resources (creativity, interest, passion, and curiosity) are dedicated to teaching and providing opportunities to students that help them navigate the “chaos” through personal empowerment and teaching content that contributes to their quality of life (i.e., Art of Happiness, Human Relationships, Social Psychology, General Psychology, Design Your Life Workshops).

    The teaching aspect of my career is both varied and delightful. I have been fortunate enough to teach on many psychology related topics as well teaching in many different environments. I find the classroom “setting” invigorating and I am constantly seeking new ways to do things better and source new teaching methodologies to try in the classroom.

    If you are out looking for me off campus, you are most likely going to find me: hanging with my homies (Husband and kiddos: fur and non-fur), taking and teaching yoga classes, on some travel/road trip adventure, knitting something that no one will ever use/wear, volunteering at YMCA Summer Camp, and/or hanging at a coffee shop – pretending to be intellectual by reading random books (recent sampling: Human Relationships: Lifespan Development, 7 habits of highly effective people, Siddartha, Mutant Massage, Drive 2.0), chatting with my neighbor, and crafting my random musings.

    Did you get what you came for? If you have a follow-up question or are looking for some clarification please feel free to email me: kimberlyhenderson@boisestate.edu

    When most people see that I am a Developmental Psychologist that say “oh she must study children”. Nope, I don’t. I am currently working on looking at the chaos that comes through the changes associated with significant transitions in life. One such transitions is the one that the majority of the students I am working with are making right now, the transition to adulthood. While I do not have an active research lab, the majority of my resources (creativity, interest, passion, and curiosity) are dedicated to teaching and providing opportunities to students that help them navigate the “chaos” through personal empowerment and teaching content that contributes to their quality of life (i.e., Art of Happiness, Human Relationships, Social Psychology, General Psychology, Design Your Life Workshops).

    The teaching aspect of my career is both varied and delightful. I have been fortunate enough to teach on many psychology related topics as well teaching in many different environments. I find the classroom “setting” invigorating and I am constantly seeking new ways to do things better and source new teaching methodologies to try in the classroom.

    If you are out looking for me off campus, you are most likely going to find me: hanging with my homies (Husband and kiddos: fur and non-fur), taking and teaching yoga classes, on some travel/road trip adventure, knitting something that no one will ever use/wear, volunteering at YMCA Summer Camp, and/or hanging at a coffee shop – pretending to be intellectual by reading random books (recent sampling: Human Relationships: Lifespan Development, 7 habits of highly effective people, Siddartha, Mutant Massage, Drive 2.0), chatting with my neighbor, and crafting my random musings.

    Did you get what you came for? If you have a follow-up question or are looking for some clarification please feel free to email me: kimberlyhenderson@boisestate.edu

  • Honts

    Charles R. Honts, Ph. D.

    Professor of Psychological Science

    Professor Honts continues a 40-yearlong research program that focuses on applying psychological
    science to real world problems. He is internationally recognized as one of the world’s top experts on credibility assessment have received The Harry Detwiler Award for contributions to the
    polygraph profession in Latin America and The John E. Reid Memorial Award for distinguished
    achievements in polygraph research, teaching or writing. Professor Honts has published and/or
    presented more than 400 scientific papers on deception detection. Professor Honts has also
    published and given expert testimony in the areas of interrogation and false confession, eyewitness memory/identification, and the forensic interviewing of children. Professor Honts is a frequently invited to lecture in a number of domestic and international venues. Besides the United States, Professor Honts has given lectures and continuing education in Canada, China, Columbia, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Norway, Peru, Sweden, and The Netherlands. Professor Honts has appeared in courts around the world as an expert witness 130 times. Professor Honts’ current research is
    focusing on two areas, 1) providing accurate methods for assessing the credibility of witnesses and suspects, and 2) interrogation, confession, and false confession phenomena in real world contexts. Professor Honts was the President of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association for the 2005-2006 term.

    Professor Honts continues a 40-yearlong research program that focuses on applying psychological
    science to real world problems. He is internationally recognized as one of the world’s top experts on credibility assessment have received The Harry Detwiler Award for contributions to the
    polygraph profession in Latin America and The John E. Reid Memorial Award for distinguished
    achievements in polygraph research, teaching or writing. Professor Honts has published and/or
    presented more than 400 scientific papers on deception detection. Professor Honts has also
    published and given expert testimony in the areas of interrogation and false confession, eyewitness memory/identification, and the forensic interviewing of children. Professor Honts is a frequently invited to lecture in a number of domestic and international venues. Besides the United States, Professor Honts has given lectures and continuing education in Canada, China, Columbia, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Norway, Peru, Sweden, and The Netherlands. Professor Honts has appeared in courts around the world as an expert witness 130 times. Professor Honts’ current research is
    focusing on two areas, 1) providing accurate methods for assessing the credibility of witnesses and suspects, and 2) interrogation, confession, and false confession phenomena in real world contexts. Professor Honts was the President of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association for the 2005-2006 term.

  • April_Photo (1)

    April Masarik

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. April Masarik joined the Department of Psychological Science as an Assistant Professor in 2015. She earned her Ph.D. in Human Development and a M.S. in Child Development from the University of California, Davis, and a B.S. in Psychology from Boise State University. Her graduate and postdoctoral training focused on the identification of genetic, social, and psychological influences on human development and family functioning in European-American and Mexican-American families. She loves being back at Boise State University, where her love for research and developmental science was first nurtured.

    Her research interests, broadly speaking, include life course development, family relationships, stress, coping, and resilience. Dr. Masarik directs the Human Development and Ecology Lab on campus, where she collaborates with undergraduate research assistants, faculty in the Department of Anthropology, community organizations, and cultural brokers to investigate the various social, cultural, and biological influences on development. Her primary focus at the moment is understanding the stressors and protective factors that influence educational attainment among refugee youth as they resettle in Boise. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and the Spencer Foundation recently funded this research.

    Dr. April Masarik joined the Department of Psychological Science as an Assistant Professor in 2015. She earned her Ph.D. in Human Development and a M.S. in Child Development from the University of California, Davis, and a B.S. in Psychology from Boise State University. Her graduate and postdoctoral training focused on the identification of genetic, social, and psychological influences on human development and family functioning in European-American and Mexican-American families. She loves being back at Boise State University, where her love for research and developmental science was first nurtured.

    Her research interests, broadly speaking, include life course development, family relationships, stress, coping, and resilience. Dr. Masarik directs the Human Development and Ecology Lab on campus, where she collaborates with undergraduate research assistants, faculty in the Department of Anthropology, community organizations, and cultural brokers to investigate the various social, cultural, and biological influences on development. Her primary focus at the moment is understanding the stressors and protective factors that influence educational attainment among refugee youth as they resettle in Boise. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and the Spencer Foundation recently funded this research.

  • CEM Headshot 2 2019

    Cindy McCrea

    Lecturer

    I am an experimental health psychologist by training, I am intrigued by the impact psychological patterns, emotions and attitudes have on the body and how those contribute to or detract from wellness. I have focused my undergraduate intensive research agenda on the following two lines of research: Do feelings of social rejection prevent people from making healthy choices? If so, what sorts of interventions may ameliorate this effect? And, the impact of metacognitive training on college student critical thinking skills. I very much enjoy my teaching and advising roles in the department as well. My favorite courses to teach are PSYC 101, 295, 321 and 331.

    I am an experimental health psychologist by training, I am intrigued by the impact psychological patterns, emotions and attitudes have on the body and how those contribute to or detract from wellness. I have focused my undergraduate intensive research agenda on the following two lines of research: Do feelings of social rejection prevent people from making healthy choices? If so, what sorts of interventions may ameliorate this effect? And, the impact of metacognitive training on college student critical thinking skills. I very much enjoy my teaching and advising roles in the department as well. My favorite courses to teach are PSYC 101, 295, 321 and 331.

  • Tedd McDonald

    Professor

    Dr. Tedd McDonald is a community psychologist with broad interests in the mental health and well-being of people in a variety of contexts, including families, neighborhoods, and societies. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1998, and joined Boise State in 2001. A self-described utility-infielder (or a “Jack of all trades and master of none”), Dr. McDonald has taught many courses in the department, including Capstone Perspectives, Community Mental Health, Community Psychology, Intro to Counseling Skills, Learning, Personality, Research Methods, and Statistical Methods. His research is broadly related to community mental health, particularly as it relates to vulnerable populations including high risk children and families, youth involved in the juvenile justice system, members of resettlement communities (i.e., refugees), isolated rural residents, and Native Americans. He contracts with numerous agencies on externally-funded research, and employs both undergraduate and graduate students for either course credit or pay.

    Dr. Tedd McDonald is a community psychologist with broad interests in the mental health and well-being of people in a variety of contexts, including families, neighborhoods, and societies. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1998, and joined Boise State in 2001. A self-described utility-infielder (or a “Jack of all trades and master of none”), Dr. McDonald has taught many courses in the department, including Capstone Perspectives, Community Mental Health, Community Psychology, Intro to Counseling Skills, Learning, Personality, Research Methods, and Statistical Methods. His research is broadly related to community mental health, particularly as it relates to vulnerable populations including high risk children and families, youth involved in the juvenile justice system, members of resettlement communities (i.e., refugees), isolated rural residents, and Native Americans. He contracts with numerous agencies on externally-funded research, and employs both undergraduate and graduate students for either course credit or pay.

  • Pritchard

    Mary Pritchard

    Professor

    Dr. Mary Pritchard received her PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Denver. She regularly teaches Psychology of Eating, Psychology of Health, Social Psychology and special topics seminars. She specializes in body image and eating disorders and has authored over 50 publications on those topics. To learn more about Dr. Pritchard’s research and openings for Teaching Assistants in her classes or Research Assistants in her lab, please visit the Body Image Lab at Boise State.

    Dr. Mary Pritchard received her PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Denver. She regularly teaches Psychology of Eating, Psychology of Health, Social Psychology and special topics seminars. She specializes in body image and eating disorders and has authored over 50 publications on those topics. To learn more about Dr. Pritchard’s research and openings for Teaching Assistants in her classes or Research Assistants in her lab, please visit the Body Image Lab at Boise State.

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    Roberto Refinetti

    Professor

    Dr. Refinetti is a professor of psychology and an active biomedical researcher at Boise State University. He received his doctoral degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1987, conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia, and taught at the College of William & Mary and the University of South Carolina before joining the faculty of Boise State University in 2014. His laboratory research on biological rhythms has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Refinetti is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Circadian Rhythms and of the journal Sexuality & Culture and author of the book Circadian Physiology (currently in its third edition). He has published more than 200 articles in professional journals, and his scientific reputation is at the top 3% of professors at research universities (h index = 32). He is a Fellow of the American Physiological Society and a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms, and five other professional associations. His laboratory’s web site is www.circadian.org.

    Dr. Refinetti is a professor of psychology and an active biomedical researcher at Boise State University. He received his doctoral degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1987, conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia, and taught at the College of William & Mary and the University of South Carolina before joining the faculty of Boise State University in 2014. His laboratory research on biological rhythms has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Refinetti is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Circadian Rhythms and of the journal Sexuality & Culture and author of the book Circadian Physiology (currently in its third edition). He has published more than 200 articles in professional journals, and his scientific reputation is at the top 3% of professors at research universities (h index = 32). He is a Fellow of the American Physiological Society and a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms, and five other professional associations. His laboratory’s web site is www.circadian.org.

  • Stone

    Brian W. Stone

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Stone is a Cognitive Psychologist with a focus on perception and action, as well as a background in Philosophy of Mind. He teaches classes in the experimental cluster such as Perception, Cognitive Psychology, and Learning, as well as larger courses such as PSYC 101. His research has spanned topics such as: tool use in human and non-human primates; visual, haptic, and multisensory mechanisms in the use and tracking of objects or limbs; congenital aphantasia (lack of mental imagery); and scholarship of teaching and learning, especially in relation to visual impairment and accessibility in the college classroom.

    Dr. Stone is a Cognitive Psychologist with a focus on perception and action, as well as a background in Philosophy of Mind. He teaches classes in the experimental cluster such as Perception, Cognitive Psychology, and Learning, as well as larger courses such as PSYC 101. His research has spanned topics such as: tool use in human and non-human primates; visual, haptic, and multisensory mechanisms in the use and tracking of objects or limbs; congenital aphantasia (lack of mental imagery); and scholarship of teaching and learning, especially in relation to visual impairment and accessibility in the college classroom.

  • Jennifer Weaver

    Associate Professor

    Dr. Weaver earned her doctorate in developmental psychology at the University of California, Irvine in 2009. She joined the faculty at Boise State in January, 2012 after completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Her research interests are in infant and early child development, particularly parenting and the family’s role in children’s social development. In recent work she has been exploring infant feeding practices, such as bottle and breastfeeding, and how this relates to parents’ behavior and well being. Dr. Weaver has also been extensively involved with the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, a national study looking at the effects of child care and parenting on children’s development from birth to age 15. At Boise State, Dr. Weaver frequently teaches Psyc 309 (Child Development), Psyc 419 (Multicultural Children and Families), and PSYC 321 (Research Methods). In her free time, Dr. Weaver enjoys spending time with her husband and four children.

    Dr. Weaver earned her doctorate in developmental psychology at the University of California, Irvine in 2009. She joined the faculty at Boise State in January, 2012 after completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Her research interests are in infant and early child development, particularly parenting and the family’s role in children’s social development. In recent work she has been exploring infant feeding practices, such as bottle and breastfeeding, and how this relates to parents’ behavior and well being. Dr. Weaver has also been extensively involved with the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, a national study looking at the effects of child care and parenting on children’s development from birth to age 15. At Boise State, Dr. Weaver frequently teaches Psyc 309 (Child Development), Psyc 419 (Multicultural Children and Families), and PSYC 321 (Research Methods). In her free time, Dr. Weaver enjoys spending time with her husband and four children.

  • Diane Hinkle

    Administrative Assistant I

Our Adjunct Faculty

  • Armentrout

    Scott Armentrout

    Adjunct Professor

    I’ve been with BSU so long that when I came aboard, online courses were relatively rare and Blackboard was a puzzle to most! Since then I’ve helped develop online courses from face-to-face models (PSYC 301) working with Distance Learning folks, and created 5 week courses from 15 week courses. My 2 courses in FA19 are both online courses. I teach General Psych (101), Abnormal Psych (301), and I just finished the first 5-week session of the Psychology of Health (331). Earlier in my time at BSU I taught a Child Development course as well.

    I’m a licensed clinical psychologist and have worked as Clinical Director for a couple of non-profits in town. I’ve also had a private practice in Boise for the last 20 years, though I closed my practice last December. Clinically, I specialize in psychoeducational assessment and psychological assessment. I enjoy treating anxiety disorders (OCD, Generalized Anxiety Disorder), and depressive disorders. I thoroughly enjoy marriage/couples counseling as well. Lately I’ve been interested in integrative behavioral health, with psychologists imbedded in physician’s practices. The biopsychosocial model with regard to mental health and wellness has always more intuitive sense to me than the traditional medical model.

    Psychological Science

    I’ve been with BSU so long that when I came aboard, online courses were relatively rare and Blackboard was a puzzle to most! Since then I’ve helped develop online courses from face-to-face models (PSYC 301) working with Distance Learning folks, and created 5 week courses from 15 week courses. My 2 courses in FA19 are both online courses. I teach General Psych (101), Abnormal Psych (301), and I just finished the first 5-week session of the Psychology of Health (331). Earlier in my time at BSU I taught a Child Development course as well.

    I’m a licensed clinical psychologist and have worked as Clinical Director for a couple of non-profits in town. I’ve also had a private practice in Boise for the last 20 years, though I closed my practice last December. Clinically, I specialize in psychoeducational assessment and psychological assessment. I enjoy treating anxiety disorders (OCD, Generalized Anxiety Disorder), and depressive disorders. I thoroughly enjoy marriage/couples counseling as well. Lately I’ve been interested in integrative behavioral health, with psychologists imbedded in physician’s practices. The biopsychosocial model with regard to mental health and wellness has always more intuitive sense to me than the traditional medical model.

  • Gerald Bell

  • Everson Picture

    Eric Everson

    Adjunct Professor

    Eric Everson is a licensed psychologist in his fifth year as an adjunct in the Psychology department at Boise State. He is a staff psychologist at the Boise VA Medical Center,
    where he is also the Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Coordinator and lead supervisor in outpatient mental health for the Boise VA’s APA-accredited predoctoral internship program.
    Eric’s clinical work with the veteran population includes individual, couples, and group therapies addressing a range of mental health and psychosocial concerns. Eric earned
    his PhD in Counseling Psychology from Marquette University, having previously earned an MA in Community Counseling and BA in Criminal Justice at Gonzaga University.
    He has taught Intro to Counseling Skills, Abnormal Psychology, and Personality at Boise State.

    Psychological Science

    Eric Everson is a licensed psychologist in his fifth year as an adjunct in the Psychology department at Boise State. He is a staff psychologist at the Boise VA Medical Center,
    where he is also the Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Coordinator and lead supervisor in outpatient mental health for the Boise VA’s APA-accredited predoctoral internship program.
    Eric’s clinical work with the veteran population includes individual, couples, and group therapies addressing a range of mental health and psychosocial concerns. Eric earned
    his PhD in Counseling Psychology from Marquette University, having previously earned an MA in Community Counseling and BA in Criminal Justice at Gonzaga University.
    He has taught Intro to Counseling Skills, Abnormal Psychology, and Personality at Boise State.

  • Golden

    Carolyn Golden

    Adjunct Professor/Licensed Psychologist

    Carolyn Golden is a licensed psychologist who, in addition to teaching as an adjunct professor at BSU, sees clients for therapy and testing at Northwest Neurobehavioral Health, LLC in Meridian, Idaho. She earned her PsyD from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology in Chicago and came to Idaho for her predoctoral internship in 2004. At NNH, Dr. Golden works with children, families, and adults, particularly those with autism, OCD, and anxiety. She enjoys teaching and training, supervising interns and post-doctoral clinicians. Her joys in teaching include increasing critical thinking skills and encouraging curiosity.

    Psychological Science

    Carolyn Golden is a licensed psychologist who, in addition to teaching as an adjunct professor at BSU, sees clients for therapy and testing at Northwest Neurobehavioral Health, LLC in Meridian, Idaho. She earned her PsyD from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology in Chicago and came to Idaho for her predoctoral internship in 2004. At NNH, Dr. Golden works with children, families, and adults, particularly those with autism, OCD, and anxiety. She enjoys teaching and training, supervising interns and post-doctoral clinicians. Her joys in teaching include increasing critical thinking skills and encouraging curiosity.

  • Hatcher

    Neiman M. Hatcher, PhD, MBA, MS

    Adjunct Professor

    Dr. Neiman Hatcher is an Adjunct Professor at Boise State University where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Statistics, and Cross-Cultural Psychology. Dr. Hatcher received a dual PhD in Clinical Psychology and Industrial/Organizational Psychology from the University of California, San Diego and also holds a MBA an MS from Stanford University and BS from Santa Clara University. In addition to his academic experience, Dr. Hatcher is Managing Partner and Founder of P3 Strategy Group, an organizational consulting firm specializing in aligning people strategy with business strategy. He holds expertise in the areas of Talent Strategy, Learning & Development, Leadership Development, Organizational, Team, and Individual Assessment, Data Analysis, Team Effectiveness, and Team-Building.

    Dr. Neiman Hatcher is an Adjunct Professor at Boise State University where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Statistics, and Cross-Cultural Psychology. Dr. Hatcher received a dual PhD in Clinical Psychology and Industrial/Organizational Psychology from the University of California, San Diego and also holds a MBA an MS from Stanford University and BS from Santa Clara University. In addition to his academic experience, Dr. Hatcher is Managing Partner and Founder of P3 Strategy Group, an organizational consulting firm specializing in aligning people strategy with business strategy. He holds expertise in the areas of Talent Strategy, Learning & Development, Leadership Development, Organizational, Team, and Individual Assessment, Data Analysis, Team Effectiveness, and Team-Building.

  • Hulbert

    Ryan J Hulbert, Ph.D.,

    Ryan J Hulbert, Ph.D., graduated from Brigham Young University, and received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, with sub-specialties in alcoholism treatment and rural community mental health. Dr. Hulbert served as a staff psychologist and Director of Research at the Cherokee Mental Health Institute in Cherokee, Iowa from 1988 and 1993. He was the Chief Psychologist of BPA Behavioral Health for 8 years, and was the Clinical Services Administrator for the Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections from 2001-2009. In 2010, he assisted in the initial program development for the Management & Training Corporation’s Correctional Alternative Placement Program (CAPP), in Idaho. Beginning in 2015 he has taught psychology courses as an adjunct faculty member at Boise State University. He conducts psychological evaluations for a variety of agencies in Idaho and the Shoshone-PaiuteTribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation. He views his strengths as compassion, creativity, and enthusiasm, in working with others to enhance health and reduce human suffering through increasingly effective, accessible, and cost effective methods. He and his wife, Theresa, have 5 sons, 2 daughters, 5 daughters-in-law, 2 sons-in-law, and a growing number of grandchildren. They live in the country near Parma, Idaho. Dr. Hulbert very much enjoys spending time with his family, fishing, helping others, and doing family history research.

    Psychological Science

    Ryan J Hulbert, Ph.D., graduated from Brigham Young University, and received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, with sub-specialties in alcoholism treatment and rural community mental health. Dr. Hulbert served as a staff psychologist and Director of Research at the Cherokee Mental Health Institute in Cherokee, Iowa from 1988 and 1993. He was the Chief Psychologist of BPA Behavioral Health for 8 years, and was the Clinical Services Administrator for the Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections from 2001-2009. In 2010, he assisted in the initial program development for the Management & Training Corporation’s Correctional Alternative Placement Program (CAPP), in Idaho. Beginning in 2015 he has taught psychology courses as an adjunct faculty member at Boise State University. He conducts psychological evaluations for a variety of agencies in Idaho and the Shoshone-PaiuteTribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation. He views his strengths as compassion, creativity, and enthusiasm, in working with others to enhance health and reduce human suffering through increasingly effective, accessible, and cost effective methods. He and his wife, Theresa, have 5 sons, 2 daughters, 5 daughters-in-law, 2 sons-in-law, and a growing number of grandchildren. They live in the country near Parma, Idaho. Dr. Hulbert very much enjoys spending time with his family, fishing, helping others, and doing family history research.

  • Jennifer Laude

  • Laudicina

    Craig Laudicina

    Craig is a Boise State Alumni, and a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (Supervisor) in the State of Idaho. He received a BS in Psychology from Boise State University, and an MS in Counseling from the University of Wyoming. He has been teaching for Boise State since 2014, and is a member of the Mobile Crisis Unit with the Department of Health and Welfare. Craig is passionate about teaching and counseling. He loves working with students seeking to further their knowledge in the fields of psychology and finds it equally rewarding helping people living with Mental Illness. “My job is to watch people grow and embark upon self-discovery, aiding in their learning not only about themselves, but world around them as well. Counseling and teaching are a way of life, not just a job!”

    Psychological Science

    Craig is a Boise State Alumni, and a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (Supervisor) in the State of Idaho. He received a BS in Psychology from Boise State University, and an MS in Counseling from the University of Wyoming. He has been teaching for Boise State since 2014, and is a member of the Mobile Crisis Unit with the Department of Health and Welfare. Craig is passionate about teaching and counseling. He loves working with students seeking to further their knowledge in the fields of psychology and finds it equally rewarding helping people living with Mental Illness. “My job is to watch people grow and embark upon self-discovery, aiding in their learning not only about themselves, but world around them as well. Counseling and teaching are a way of life, not just a job!”

  • Murray

    Crista Murray

    Adjunct Professor

    Crista has taught for undergraduate psychology classes for 15 years and enjoys helping students feel successful at learning. Her primary teaching goal is to engage students in unique ways so they may increase their understanding of the field of psychology. Outside of teaching, Crista maintains a private practice where her expertise include anxiety reduction and whole person wellness.

    Psychological Science

    Crista has taught for undergraduate psychology classes for 15 years and enjoys helping students feel successful at learning. Her primary teaching goal is to engage students in unique ways so they may increase their understanding of the field of psychology. Outside of teaching, Crista maintains a private practice where her expertise include anxiety reduction and whole person wellness.

  • Passman

    Carol Passman

    Adjunct Professor

    Education:

    University of Akron, Akron, OH
    PhD Counseling Psychology, 1998
    Doctoral Dissertation: Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help

    University of Akron, Akron, OH
    MA Counseling Psychology, 1992
    Master’s Thesis: Perceived Social Support in Acute and Chronic Pain Sufferers

    Washburn University, Topeka, KS
    BA Psychology, 1990
    Honor Thesis: The Relationship between Goal Setting and Acute Pain Tolerance
    BA English, 1990

    Professional interests and expertise include human growth and development; career development; personality development and disorders; adjustment and stress-related disorders; substance abuse and addiction; online education.

    Psychological Science

    Education:

    University of Akron, Akron, OH
    PhD Counseling Psychology, 1998
    Doctoral Dissertation: Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help

    University of Akron, Akron, OH
    MA Counseling Psychology, 1992
    Master’s Thesis: Perceived Social Support in Acute and Chronic Pain Sufferers

    Washburn University, Topeka, KS
    BA Psychology, 1990
    Honor Thesis: The Relationship between Goal Setting and Acute Pain Tolerance
    BA English, 1990

    Professional interests and expertise include human growth and development; career development; personality development and disorders; adjustment and stress-related disorders; substance abuse and addiction; online education.

  • Recent Emeritus Faculty

    Teresa Z. Taylor

    Pennie S. Seibert

    Teresa Z. Taylor

    Pennie S. Seibert