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Resources

“How to Create an Engaging Science Presentation: A Quick Guide.” This article published in Nature describes the process for creating compelling research presentations, choosing themes, and more.

“Secrets of Good Science Writing.” This collection of stories published in The Guardian tackle topics such as how to create a science blog, talking to reporters, and more.

“Science Journalism Masterclasses.” The Open Notebook is a community that is a useful resource for science journalists and aspiring science writers. Visit the site to learn more about free science communications masterclasses.

“Science–graphic art partnerships to increase research impact.” This research published in Nature suggests researchers partner with graphic artists to support their research impact.

Escape from the Ivory Tower: A Guide to Making Your Science Matter, Nancy Baron, 2010, Island Press. In this practical and entertaining guide to communicating science, Baron explains how to engage your audience and explain why a particular finding matters. She explores how to ace your interview, promote a paper, enter the political fray, and use new media to connect with your audience. The book includes advice from journalists, decision makers, new media experts, bloggers and some of the thousands of scientists who have participated in her communication workshops. Many of the researchers she has worked with have gone on to become well-known spokespeople for science-related issues. Whether you are an absolute beginner or a seasoned veteran looking to hone your skills, “Escape From the Ivory Tower” can help make your science understood, appreciated and perhaps acted upon.

“Made to Stick” by Chip and Dan Heath, 2007, Penguin Random House. Focusing on successful marketing campaigns and undying urban legends, this book is written for anyone who strives to craft messages that are memorable and lasting.