Full / Part Time Careers

Graduates from the ROTC program commission as Second Lieutenants into one of three components of military service. Each component has distinct advantages.

Soldiers also have the opportunity to serve in one of several Career Fields, ranging from computer experts to human resources to combat arms.

Full Time.

The U.S. Army’s Active Duty component offers many career choices and opportunities for a wide variety of personality types. Graduates who commission into the Active Duty will receive specialized training in their career field before reporting to their assigned military installation. They receive full salary, allowance for housing, and an additional stipend for food. The benefits include full medical and dental coverage for themselves and their dependents. Learn more about Full Time Active Duty.

Part Time.

Soldiers in the National Guard serve both community and country. Their normal requirements are to serve for one weekend per month, and for a two-week training period once per year. They are activated as needed to respond to domestic emergencies, reconstruction missions, training international partner nations, overseas missions, counter-drug efforts, and more. The Guard always responds with speed, strength and efficiency, helping to defend American freedom and ideals. They are Citizen-Soldiers.

Each State and U.S. territory has its own National Guard. As a National Guard Soldier, your primary area of operation is your home state. The state governor or the President can call on the Guard at a moment’s notice. Typically, Guard Soldiers live at home, where they can be near friends and family while holding a civilian job. Learn more about Part Time National Guard.

U.S. Army ReservePart Time.

The Army Reserve is a division of the Army that lets you serve your country on a part-time basis, while picking up valuable career skills and staying in your community. Part-time service means you serve at least one weekend per month and two additional weeks per year, with the ability to scale up or down depending on your life and career needs. The Army Reserve offers more than 100 different jobs that provide valuable training and experience for your long-term life goals, in addition to being a well-trained Soldier. Learn more about Part Time Army Reserve.

Military Service Obligations

Time commitments are based on component (Active Duty (AD), Army Reserve (USAR), and Army National Guard (ARNG)) and money. Below are the 4 different scenarios.

1) If you are a scholarship Cadet and commission into the AD you will serve 4 years on AD and last 4 years of your contract are either spent on AD, in the USAR or ARNG, or in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR).

2) If you are a non-scholarship Cadet and commission into the AD you will serve 3 years on AD and the last 5 years of your contract will be spent either on AD, in the USAR or ARNG, or in the IRR.

3) If you are a scholarship Cadet  and commission into the USAR or ARNG you will serve 8 years in a drilling status (one weekend/month and two weeks/year for annual training).

4) If you are a non-scholarship Cadet and commission into the USAR or ARNG you will serve 6 years in a drilling status (one weekend/month and two weeks/year for annual training) and the last 2 years of your contract are either spent in the USAR, ARNG or IRR.