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Current Students & Post-Docs

Robin TraylerRobin Trayler, Ph.D.

Dr. Robin Trayler is a part-time postdoctoral researcher in the IGL focused on the development of novel Bayesian methods for deep time age modeling and time scale creation. He is currently working on an integration of astrochronological inversion results as prior information in age-depth modeling. Robin’s research is supported by a National Science Foundation Integrated Earth Systems grant, “Collaborative Research: Anatomy of a Greenhouse World: The Early Eocene of the Green River Basin, Wyoming”. Robin is also the Technical Director of the Stable Isotope Ecology Laboratory at the University of California, Merced.

Claire OstwaldClaire Harrigan

Claire Harrigan is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geosciences and a research assistant in the IGL. Claire’s research interests lie in fields of isotope geochemistry and high-precision geochronology, particular for enhancing our understanding of orogenic processes. Her dissertation work includes foundational studies in the application of tandem in situ LA-ICPMS U-Pb and trace element analysis and high precision CA-TIMS U-Pb zircon geochronology, as well as innovative computational tools for integrating and interpreting petrochronological systems. Along the way she has also led studies of the thermal evolution of large meteorite impact structures and Devonian chronostratigraphy and time scale construction using Bayesian methods. Claire’s research is supported by the Geological Society of America and the National Science Foundation.

Michael Mohr

Mike Mohr is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geosciences and a research assistant in the IGL. Mike’s research focus is in high-precision U-Pb and Th-Pb geochronology for  applications in petrochronology, mineral resources, and the geologic time scale. Although he loves zircon (a requirement for geochronologists), he is particularly interested in non-conventional accessory minerals like titanite, chevkinite, allanite, monazite, and thorite, and in furthering the utility of Th-Pb dating via ID-TIMS. Mike has also been the lead investigator in chronostratigraphic studies at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument for the last three years. Mike’s research is supported by the Geological Society of America, the National Park Service, and the Boise State University Nuclear Materials Fellowship.

Thomas Farrell

Thomas Farrell is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geosciences and a research assistant in the IGL. Thomas’s research focus is the application of tandem rapid in situ (LA-ICPMS) and high-precision isotope dilution (ID-TIMS) U-Pb geochronology for applications in tectonics, chronostratigraphy, and the geologic time scale. He is pursuing work on the evolution of the Cambrian Earth system in southwest Laurentia, including the Sauk transgression and associated perturbations to the carbon cycle. Thomas is also developing novel analytical and statistical tools for deciphering the provenance signal and maximum depositional age constraints hosted in detrital zircons. Thomas’s research is supported by the Geological Society of America and the National Science Foundation.

Molly Paul

Molly Paul is a new PhD student in the Department of Geosciences and a research assistant in the IGL. Molly’s research focus is the subcontinental lithosphere mantle, and the record of its geochemical evolution expressed in metasomatism. She is currently developing (with Dr. Linda Reynard) an extraction line for measuring trace amounts of nitrogen in mantle phlogopite, and will be applying a suite of analytical tools to the study of both modal and cryptic signals of metasomatism, including both in situ and isotope dilution measurements of trace elements and U-Pb isotope ratios in mantle zircon and rutile. Molly’s research is supported by the Geological Society of America.

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