Meet our Team

Faculty

  • Temkin Martinez

    Michal Temkin Martinez

    Director for the Boise State Linguistics Lab, Associate Professor

    Michal Temkin Martinez is the director for the Boise State Linguistics Lab. She has a BA and MA in Linguistics from California State University, Northridge and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Southern California. Her research include theoretical and experimental phonology and language documentation. She is currently collaborating with Mwaliko Mberwa and  Dr. Jon Dayley on the documentation of Somali-Chizigula (xma; Bantu, G.311) and her interests in phonology involve the interaction of variation and exceptionality in phonological phenomena. She has worked on Modern Hebrew and Rioplatense Spanish.

    Dr. Temkin Martinez currently serves as the Honors College Faculty in Residence and is Associate Editor of the journal Language with responsibilities for the Teaching Linguistics section of the journal.

    Michal Martinez’s Downloadable publications

    Michal Temkin Martinez is the director for the Boise State Linguistics Lab. She has a BA and MA in Linguistics from California State University, Northridge and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Southern California. Her research include theoretical and experimental phonology and language documentation. She is currently collaborating with Mwaliko Mberwa and  Dr. Jon Dayley on the documentation of Somali-Chizigula (xma; Bantu, G.311) and her interests in phonology involve the interaction of variation and exceptionality in phonological phenomena. She has worked on Modern Hebrew and Rioplatense Spanish.

    Dr. Temkin Martinez currently serves as the Honors College Faculty in Residence and is Associate Editor of the journal Language with responsibilities for the Teaching Linguistics section of the journal.

    Michal Martinez’s Downloadable publications

  • Keck

    Casey Keck

    Associate Chair of the English Department, Associate Professor of Linguistics

    Casey Keck joined the faculty of the English Department at Boise State University in 2011. She has a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics and an M.A. in Teaching English as a Second Languge, both from Northern Arizona University. Her research interests include corpus linguistics, second language writing, and pedagogical grammar. Dr. Keck directs the BSU branch of Project SHINE (Students Helping in the Naturalization of Elders).

    Casey Keck joined the faculty of the English Department at Boise State University in 2011. She has a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics and an M.A. in Teaching English as a Second Languge, both from Northern Arizona University. Her research interests include corpus linguistics, second language writing, and pedagogical grammar. Dr. Keck directs the BSU branch of Project SHINE (Students Helping in the Naturalization of Elders).

  • Shuck

    Gail Shuck

    Coordinator of English Language Programs, Associate Professor of Linguistics

    Gail Shuck is Coordinator of English Language Support Programs for Boise State. She teaches writing courses for nonnative English speakers as well as courses related to teaching English as a second language. Her recent publications include “Racializing the Nonnative English Speaker” (Journal of Language, Identity, and Education) and “Ownership of Texts, Ownership of Language” (Vol. 4[3]). She is currently investigating how Boise State’s multilingual students perceive their identities in relation to various language communities.

    Gail Shuck’s Downloadable publications

    Gail Shuck is Coordinator of English Language Support Programs for Boise State. She teaches writing courses for nonnative English speakers as well as courses related to teaching English as a second language. Her recent publications include “Racializing the Nonnative English Speaker” (Journal of Language, Identity, and Education) and “Ownership of Texts, Ownership of Language” (Vol. 4[3]). She is currently investigating how Boise State’s multilingual students perceive their identities in relation to various language communities.

    Gail Shuck’s Downloadable publications

  • Thornes

    Tim Thornes

    Associate Professor of Linguistics

    Tim Thornes joined the linguistics faculty in the Department of English at Boise State University in 2012. He earned both an M.A. and Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Oregon where he developed his interests in language typology, language documentation, and Native American languages. In 2003, he completed a comprehensive grammar of the Northern Paiute language as a dissertation. His earlier experience includes a B.A. in English (writing emphasis) from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota and three years working as a primary school construction supervisor as a Peace Corps volunteer in Gabon. He has taught linguistics at the University of Oregon and University of Central Arkansas. He has presented and published widely on aspects of Northern Paiute grammatical structures while exploring their relationships both within the ecology of the language and from a cross-linguistic, typological perspective.

    Tim Thornes’s Downloadable publications

    Tim Thornes joined the linguistics faculty in the Department of English at Boise State University in 2012. He earned both an M.A. and Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Oregon where he developed his interests in language typology, language documentation, and Native American languages. In 2003, he completed a comprehensive grammar of the Northern Paiute language as a dissertation. His earlier experience includes a B.A. in English (writing emphasis) from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota and three years working as a primary school construction supervisor as a Peace Corps volunteer in Gabon. He has taught linguistics at the University of Oregon and University of Central Arkansas. He has presented and published widely on aspects of Northern Paiute grammatical structures while exploring their relationships both within the ecology of the language and from a cross-linguistic, typological perspective.

    Tim Thornes’s Downloadable publications

  • VanderStouwe

    Chris VanderStouwe

    Lecturer of Linguistics, Affiliated Faculty in Gender Studies

    Chris VanderStouwe joined the English department in 2016. He is a lecturer in Linguistics as well as being on the advisory board and affiliated faculty of the Gender Studies Program. His research interests primarily involve gender, sexuality, and identity through the lens of language, as well as linguistic anthropology and language and interaction more broadly. His current research focus explores linguistic constructions of sexuality and sexual identities among straight-identified men interested in men. Recent work has also included ethnographic work on understanding safe spaces among LBGTQ youth and interactional explorations of participation frameworks in casual settings. Originally from California, his research has also involved work on same-sex marriage, marriage equality, and research and activism surrounding Proposition 8 in California, which removed the right of same-sex couples to marry in that state. Chris’ work frequently aims to link academia to the everyday world, especially as it can link to issues of public policy, social justice, and public health.

    Chris VanderStouwe joined the English department in 2016. He is a lecturer in Linguistics as well as being on the advisory board and affiliated faculty of the Gender Studies Program. His research interests primarily involve gender, sexuality, and identity through the lens of language, as well as linguistic anthropology and language and interaction more broadly. His current research focus explores linguistic constructions of sexuality and sexual identities among straight-identified men interested in men. Recent work has also included ethnographic work on understanding safe spaces among LBGTQ youth and interactional explorations of participation frameworks in casual settings. Originally from California, his research has also involved work on same-sex marriage, marriage equality, and research and activism surrounding Proposition 8 in California, which removed the right of same-sex couples to marry in that state. Chris’ work frequently aims to link academia to the everyday world, especially as it can link to issues of public policy, social justice, and public health.

  • Jon Dayley

    Professor Emeritus of Linguistics

    Jon Dayley received a BA and MA in Anthropology from Idaho State University and an MA and Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley. He taught linguistics and did research on Mayan languages in Guatemala for several years, worked as a writer and researcher for the Experiment in International Living in Vermont and Belize, and also taught linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been at Boise State University since 1982. His specialties are English grammar, American Indian languages (especially Uto-Aztecan and Mayan), and Creole languages. He has written a number of books and articles on Shoshoni, Panamint Shoshone, Tz’utujil Mayan, and Belizean Creole.

    Jon Dayley received a BA and MA in Anthropology from Idaho State University and an MA and Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley. He taught linguistics and did research on Mayan languages in Guatemala for several years, worked as a writer and researcher for the Experiment in International Living in Vermont and Belize, and also taught linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been at Boise State University since 1982. His specialties are English grammar, American Indian languages (especially Uto-Aztecan and Mayan), and Creole languages. He has written a number of books and articles on Shoshoni, Panamint Shoshone, Tz’utujil Mayan, and Belizean Creole.

Students

Ahmad Alotaibi
Chris Dale
Sarah Dowd
Kierra Hansen
Sam Jones
Scott Landrum
Cece Staggs

LingLab alumni

Jared Albrecht
Lucas Avichouser
Max Badesheim III
Hannah Baker
Alisha Barrera
Haley Boone (Currently at UNC, Chapel Hill)
Carole Brenton
Theadora Callahan (Currently studying in Japan)
Michael Christensen (Currently teaching in China)
Danielle Davidson
Tory Del Toro
Janellle Derie
Bailee Dunstan
Zachary Espil
Rae Felte
Rachel Gallina (Currently studying in Israel)
Ellen Geary
Heather Harrington
Julian Harris
Hallie Heath
Alyssa Jane Helms
Shae Himsworth
Luke Holmgren
Ron Hurrle
Maddie Jewell
Kelli Jones
Matt Kelley (Currently at U. of Alberta)
Jessica Lahey (MA, U. of Montana)
Michael Leary
Moira May
Grace McBride
Jenny McBride
Kaitlyn McDowell (Currently at Portland State U.)
Marisa Mejia
Jessie Milanez
Kelsey Montzka (Former Fulbright in Serbia)
Ivana Mullner (Currently at Santa Clara U.)
Lynn Nelson (Currently at U. of Montana)
Monica Nesbitt (MA, U. of Texas, Arlington, Currently at Michigan State U.)
Jacqueline Phillips
Sarah Plane (MA, U. of Sydney)
Stefanie Rekow
Vanessa Rosenbaum
Simon Shifrin
Dustin Svoboda
Stephanie Todd
Emily Walton
Cody Wetherelt
Sara Williams
Savannah Wilson
Bonnie Windham (MA, U. of Hawai’i, Manōa)
Revital Zilonka (Currently at U. of North Carolina)
Elly Zimmer (Currently at U. of Arizona)
Dannii Yarbrough (MA, U. of Montana, Currently at U. of Hawai’i, Manōa)