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Nathaniel Williams, Ph.D., LCSW

Nate WilliamsAssociate Professor

Office: Education Building 711
Email: natewilliams@boisestate.edu
Phone: (208) 426-3145
Office Hours: By appointment
Curriculum Vitae
Research Spotlight

 

Nathaniel Williams, Ph.D., LCSW is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at Boise State University and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. His research focuses on advancing the implementation of evidence-based practices in routine care settings to improve the quality and effectiveness of behavioral health services for youth and families. Specifically, his work examines how organizational leadership and context influence implementation and service outcomes, strategies that target multiple levels to improve implementation, and the role of multilevel mechanisms in supporting providers to effectively use evidence-based practices. Dr. Williams is deeply committed to partnered research that engages stakeholders to generate meaningful improvements in systems and human well-being. Currently, he serves as PI of an NIMH-funded, hybrid type III implementation-effectiveness trial testing the Leadership and Organizational Change for Implementation (LOCI) strategy to improve digital measurement-based care implementation (R01 MH119127), Co-Director of the Methods Core in an NIMH Center on the integration of implementation science and behavioral economics (P50 MH 113840), and PI of multiple Idaho State research contracts focused on assessing and improving behavioral health services for youth and families. Dr. Williams holds a bachelor of arts degree in social science and master of social work degree from Boise State University and a doctorate of philosophy in social work with a minor in statistics from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is the recipient of multiple awards including a Ruth L. Kirschstein individual pre-doctoral fellowship (F31) from NIMH and a translational research scholar award from the Institute for Translational Health Sciences at the University of Washington.

Areas of Research

  • Implementation Science
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
  • Organizational Culture and Climate
  • Organizational Implementation Strategies
  • Mechanisms of Change
  • Multilevel Modeling
  • Mediation and Moderation Analysis

Selected Publications

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

  • Williams, N. J., Frederick, L., Ching, A., Mandell, D., Kang-Yi, C., & Locke, J. (2020). Embedding school cultures and climates that promote evidence-based practice implementation for youth with autism: A qualitative study. Autism.
  • Williams, N. J., Benjamin-Wolk, C., Becker-Haimes, E. M., & Beidas, R. S. (2020). Testing a theory of strategic implementation leadership, implementation climate, and clinicians’ use of evidence-based practice: A 5-year panel analysis. Implementation Science, 15(1), 10.
  • Beidas, R. S., Williams, N. J., Becker-Haimes, E., Aarons, G. A., Barg, F., Evans, A., Hadley, T., Hoagwood, K., Marcus, S. C., Neimark, G., Rubin, R., Schoenwald, S., Adams, D., Walsh, L., Zentgraf, K., & Mandell, D. S. (2019). A repeated cross-sectional study of clinicians’ use of psychotherapy techniques during 5 years of a system-wide effort to implement evidence-based practices in Philadelphia. Implementation Science, 14(1), 67.
  • Williams, N. J., & Beidas, R. S. (2019). Annual research review: The state of implementation science in child psychology and psychiatry: A review and suggestions to advance the field. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 60(4), 430-450.
  • Williams, N. J., Frank, H. E., Fredrick, L., Beidas, R. S., Mandell, D. S., Aarons, G. A., Green, P., & Locke, J. (2019). Organizational culture and climate profiles: Relationships with fidelity to three evidence-based practices for autism in elementary schools. Implementation Science, 14(1), 15.
  • Powell, B. J., Fernandez, M. E., Williams, N. J., Aarons, G. A., Beidas, R. S., Lewis, C. C., McHugh, S.  M., & Weiner, B. J. (2019). Enhancing the impact of implementation strategies in healthcare: A research agenda. Frontiers in Public Health, 7, 1-9.
  • Williams, N. J., Ehrhart, M. G., Aarons, G. A., Marcus, S. C., & Beidas, R. S. (2018). Linking molar organizational climate and strategic implementation climate to clinicians’ use of evidence-based psychotherapy techniques: Cross-sectional and lagged analyses from a two-year observational study. Implementation Science 13:85. doi: 10.1186/s13012-018-0781-2
  • Williams, N. J., Scott, L., & Aarons, G. A. (2018). Prevalence of serious emotional disturbance among US children: A meta-analysis. Psychiatric Services, 69, 32-40.
  • Beidas, R. S., Williams, N. J., Green, P. D., Aarons, G. A., Becker-Haimes, E., Evans, A. C., Rubin, R., Adams, D. R., & Marcus, S. C. (2017). Concordance between administrator and clinician ratings of organizational culture and climate. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. doi: 10.1007/s10488-016-0776-8
  • Williams, N. J., Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., & Green, P. (2017). Mechanisms of change in the ARC organizational strategy: Increasing mental health clinicians’ EBP adoption through improved organizational culture and capacity. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 44, 269-283
  • Williams, N. J. (2016). Assessing mental health clinicians’ intentions to adopt evidence-based treatments: Reliability and validity testing of the evidence-based treatment intentions scale. Implementation Science, 11(60). doi: 10.1186/s13012-016-0417-3
  • Glisson, C., Williams, N. J., Hemmelgarn, A., Proctor, E. K., & Green, P. (2016). Aligning organizational priorities with ARC to improve youth mental health service outcomes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 84, 713-725.
  • Williams, N. J. (2016). Multilevel mechanisms of implementation strategies in mental health: Integrating theory, research, and practice. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 43, 783-798.
  • Glisson, C., Williams, N. J., Hemmelgarn, A., Proctor, E. K., & Green, P. (2016). Increasing clinicians’ EBT exploration and preparation behavior in youth mental health services by changing organizational culture with ARC. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 76, 40-46.
  • Glisson, C., & Williams, N. J. (2015). Assessing and changing organizational social contexts for effective mental health services. Annual Review of Public Health, 36, 507-523.
  • Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2014). Testing a theory of organizational culture, climate and youth outcomes in child welfare systems: A United States national study. Child Abuse & Neglect, 38, 757-767.
  • Olin, S. S., Williams, N. J., Pollock, M., Armusewicz, K., Kutash, K., Glisson, C., & Hoagwood, K. E. (2014). Quality indicators for family support services and their relationship to organizational social context. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 41, 43-54.
  • Glisson, C., Williams, N. J., Green, P., Hemmelgarn, A., & Hoagwood, K. E. (2014). The organizational social context of mental health Medicaid waiver programs with family support services: Implications for research and practice. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 41, 32-42.
  • Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2013). Reducing turnover is not enough: The need for proficient organizational cultures to support positive youth outcomes in child welfare. Children and Youth Services Review, 35, 1871-1877.
  • Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., Green, P., & Williams, N. J. (2013). Randomized trial of the availability, responsiveness, and continuity (ARC) organizational intervention for improving youth outcomes in community mental health programs. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 52, 493-500.
  • Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., Green, P., Dukes, D., Atkinson, S., & Williams, N. J. (2012). Randomized trial of the availability, responsiveness, and continuity (ARC) organizational intervention with community-based mental health programs and clinicians serving youth. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, 780-787.
  • Glisson, C., Green, P., & Williams, N. J. (2012). Assessing the organizational social context (OSC) of child welfare systems: Implications for research and practice. Child Abuse & Neglect, 36, 621-632.

Book Chapters:

  • Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2020). Changing organizational social context to support evidence-based practice implementation: A conceptual and empirical review. In B. Albers, A. Shlonsky, & R. Mildon (Eds.), Implementation Science 3.0. (pp. 145-172). New York: Springer. (Link to chapter here)
  • Williams, N. J., & Glisson, C. (2014). The role of organizational culture and climate in the dissemination and implementation of empirically-supported treatments for youth. In R. Beidas, & P. Kendall (Eds.), Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in Child and Adolescent Mental Health (pp. 61-81). New York: Oxford University Press.

Technical Reports:

  • Williams, N. J., Beauchemin, J., Giuntini, G., & Hall, S. (2020). Idaho Youth Empowerment Services (YES) family survey results 2020. [Report to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Behavioral Health]. Boise, ID: Boise State University.
  • Williams, N. J., & Beauchemin, J. (2019). Idaho Youth Empowerment Services (YES) family survey results, 2019. [Report to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Behavioral Health]. Boise, ID: Boise State University.
  • Williams, N. J., & O’Reilly, N. (2018). Idaho Youth Empowerment Services (YES) workforce capacity and gaps analysis. [Report to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Behavioral Health]. Boise, ID: Boise State University.

Google Scholar Citations