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Cross-cultural interviews and surveys: 7 Guidelines for ethically collecting valid data across unfamiliar cultures

Conducting interviews and surveys in a cross-cultural setting is increasingly common for researchers, instructional design practitioners, and human performance technology (HPT) practitioners. Planning to conduct interviews and surveys in a culture that the professional may not be familiar with requires additional ethical and methodological considerations. Without taking additional precautions, one can exacerbate any number of risks such as collecting invalid and unreliable data, misinterpreting data, further marginalizing minority group members, extending project timelines, exceeding project budgets, and/or experience other unintended consequences. In this presentation, we draw from published scholarly works on cross-cultural interviewing practices across disciplines to develop evidence-based practical recommendations professionals can utilize in their own cross-cultural projects where this kind of data collection is needed.

ISPI Bay Area / Boise State Chapter

Co-sponsor:
Association for Educational Communications Technology (AECT) – Culture, Learning, and Technology Division.

  • Lisa Giacumo

    Lisa A. Giacumo

    Lisa A. Giacumo is an assistant professor of Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning at Boise State University. Her research interests focus on the use of instructional design and digital tools for global training initiatives and performance improvement. She has worked internationally as an instructional designer, trainer, and manager for businesses, universities, non-profits, and NGOs.

    Lisa A. Giacumo is an assistant professor of Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning at Boise State University. Her research interests focus on the use of instructional design and digital tools for global training initiatives and performance improvement. She has worked internationally as an instructional designer, trainer, and manager for businesses, universities, non-profits, and NGOs.

  • D'Jean Peters

    D'Jeane T. Peters

    D’Jeane T. Peters is a graduate student in Organization Performance and Workplace Learning at Boise State University, with a graduate certificate in instructional design. Her research interests focus on using principles of adult learning and instructional design practices in cross-cultural contexts. She has worked internationally as a teacher, trainer, and researcher, and is currently employed at Colorado School of Mines in the Office of International Programs.

    D’Jeane T. Peters is a graduate student in Organization Performance and Workplace Learning at Boise State University, with a graduate certificate in instructional design. Her research interests focus on using principles of adult learning and instructional design practices in cross-cultural contexts. She has worked internationally as a teacher, trainer, and researcher, and is currently employed at Colorado School of Mines in the Office of International Programs.