Browse Curriculum

Registration is required to attend all Osher Institute offerings.

To register, visit the Osher Registration Website, call Customer Services at (208) 426-1709, or print a Fall 2019 Paper Registration Form (PDF) and submit it to the Osher office.

Fall 2019 Offerings

Starting in August

Packet Pick-Up Day

Stop by the Yanke Building to pick up your membership packet, enjoy some refreshments, and connect with other Osher members. A short program will begin at 10:30 a.m. to provide new and current members a chance to get to know the Osher Institute and its staff. Learn how the curriculum is determined, how to get involved with the Institute, and get behind-the-scenes insight into how different processes work—including registration day. Stay afterwards to meet other Osher members, get a printed copy of your semester schedule, and even find your 15 seconds of fame in our new video project, “What Makes Osher Special?” We hope to see you there! Please note: This event is free, but registration is required. If you cannot stop by on Packet Pick-Up Day, your packet will be sent in the mail, as usual, on August 8.
Date and time: Wed., Aug. 7, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Cost: Free, but registration is required

The Constitution in a Crucible

This course will focus on three current constitutional issues: the scope of congressional power, the politicization of the Supreme Court, and suffrage rights for American women. The first session will analyze the Mueller report and the ongoing congressional inquiries into the Trump administration. What are the limits of congressional investigatory power and when can the president rebuke congressional subpoenas? The second session will review the politicization of the Supreme Court and the implications for the rule of law and American constitutionalism. In light of recent Supreme Court nomination hearings, does it remain a “law court” or a “political court?” Finally, in recognition of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the third session will discuss the historical, political, and constitutional issues at play in the final drive to secure suffrage rights for American women. Do concerns from opponents of women’s suffrage have any residual influence on the ongoing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment? Please note: This course features extensive Q & A with the presenter. Due to anticipated interest, we are offering this course twice, as noted below.
Presenter: Dr. David Adler, President, Alturas Institute
Date and time:
Course One: Tue., Wed., and Thu, Aug. 27, 28, and 29, 10 a.m.-noon
Course Two: Tue., Wed., and Thu, Aug. 27, 28, and 29, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Starting in September

Creating Civility, Community, and Constructive Conversations

Many believe American society has experienced a decline in decorum and respectful behavior over the past few decades. Can this problem be addressed? What is civility and why does it matter? This lecture will provide a deepened, empirical understanding of incivility, bullying, and other forms of aggressive behavior and its impact on individuals and communities. The relationship between stress and incivility will be explored, along with ways to effectively address the problem.
Presenter: Dr. Cynthia Clark, Professor Emeritus of Nursing, Boise State University
Date and time: Wed., Sept. 4, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Our Changing Climate

Fires, floods, and melting ice—can’t we talk about something nice? Scientific data overwhelmingly demonstrates that recent global temperature increases are disrupting Earth’s hydrologic, biologic, atmospheric, and geologic systems, thereby driving extreme events that result in major destruction of life and property. Despite this, it remains a challenge to effectively communicate the causes and risks of climate change and change how people think about it. Why? This lecture will apply current science to extreme events such as wildfires, hurricanes, sea level rise, and arctic warming with the compelling need for climate change communication and education.
Presenter: Dr. Jen Pierce, Associate Professor of Geosciences, Boise State University
Date and time: Wed., Sept. 4, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Dances Within Us

We all dance—through our breath, our spine, and the impulse of moving. This interactive workshop will examine the creative process in movement and ourselves. Exploration of space, time, and dynamics will be integrated with movement experiences, observation, and discussion. Attention to one’s breath and physical awareness will be fundamental to the focus on individual impulses and creativity. No dance experience necessary. Any “body” and any “ability” is right for this workshop.
Presenter: Kay Braden, choreographer and teacher
Date and time: Thu., Sept. 5, 12, 19, and 26, 10:30 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45
Capacity: 30

How to Prevent War: Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas

Published in 1938, Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas addresses the question of how to end war and examines how government, education, religion, gender, and nationalism create a matrix which inevitably leads to war. Raising critical questions about each of these, Woolf ultimately argues for founding a “Society of Outsiders.” Despite exposing the recurring patterns of war, the difficulty of change, and prescient predictions of WWII, Three Guineas ultimately is a hopeful text with a real vision of possibility. This course will examine Woolf’s text and introduce essays by her contemporaries on the topic of preventing another war. Politically-oriented poetry by the poets Spender and Auden will also be examined.
Presenter: Dr. Cheryl Hindrichs, Associate Professor of English, Boise State University
Date and time: Thu., Sept. 5, 12, 19, and 26, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

The Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s: Lecture One

Cases of Alzheimer’s disease are predicted to increase nearly 30% in Idaho over the next six years, making it one of the top concerns of seniors in the Gem state. Over the last several years, some researchers have made significant efforts to explore multimodal approaches to treating Alzheimer’s patients in early stages or addressing cognitive decline before it becomes severe enough to warrant a dementia diagnosis. This lecture will explore this important area of research and offer ideas about ways you may be able to improve your cognitive functioning and reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on November 1.
Presenter: Eric Collett, owner and principal, A Mind for All Seasons, LLC
Date and time: Fri., Sept. 6, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Beethoven String Quartet Cycle: Performance One

The year 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth; orchestras and ensembles around the world are already planning celebratory events in honor of the occasion. Join violinist Laurel Tally, violist Jennifer Drake, cellist Brian Hodges, and other string players as they perform two quartets—Op. 18, No. 1 and Op. 59, No. 1—in an intimate classroom setting. This unique experience will span from September 2019 to May 2021, and all 16 of Beethoven’s quartets will be played by the end of the cycle. Please note: Each performance requires separate registration. The second performance takes place on November 23.
Date and time: Sat., Sept. 7, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25
Capacity: 170

Drawing Workshop: Learning to Look

When was the last time you attempted to draw? Regardless of skill level, you may be surprised at what you can create. This workshop will explore the many ways humans put pencil to paper and include concepts of perspective, light source, and design. Members will practice drawing on their own while studying stunning works by incredible artists. No prior experience is necessary; all levels are welcome. Materials will be provided and are included in the cost of this workshop.
Presenter: Susie Fisher, artist and retired high school art teacher
Date and time: Mon., Sept. 9, 16, 23, and Oct. 7, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $55
Capacity: 25

Cancer Types, Treatments, and Technologies

Presented by a panel of oncologists from St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI), this course will provide an introduction to cancer, its known and suspected causes, and the effort to find more effective treatment and earlier methods of diagnosis. The first session will provide an overview of various types of cancer. The second session will present the newest treatments and technologies including immunotherapy and chimeric antigen receptor T cell transplantation. Finally, breast and prostate cancer will be examined as the most common cancers found in men and women. Learn more about this all-too-common disease and how MSTI provides services that set it apart from other cancer centers in the United States.
Presenters: Dan Zuckerman, MD, Executive Medical Director, St. Luke’s MSTI; Travis Williams, DO, St. Luke’s MSTI; Finn Petersen, MD, Director of Stem Cell Therapy, St. Luke’s MSTI; Rhiana Menen, MD, Co-Director of the Breast Program, St. Luke’s MSTI; and Stephen Brassell, MD, Director of Urologic Oncology, St. Luke’s MSTI
Date and time: Mon., Sept. 9, 10 a.m.-noon; Wed., Sept. 11, 1:30-3:30 p.m.; and Mon., Sept. 16, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

Criminalistics: From the Crime Scene to the Lab

This course will introduce members to the forensic science used to solve a crime. Learn what law enforcement officers experience when they are assigned to investigate a crime and process a crime scene—from collecting, identifying, storing, and analyzing evidence left by the perpetrator to deciding the outcomes of conviction or exoneration. The course will conclude with a discussion of casework where science solved several major cases.
Presenter: Victoria Gooch, Detective, Major Crimes Unit, Idaho State Police
Date and time: Mon., Sept. 9, 16, and 23, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Downtown Public Art Walking Tour: Event One

The City of Boise’s Department of Arts and History maintains a collection of over 700 works of public art. Downtown Boise boasts a robust concentration of works within the central business district and has been the focus of investment for the past twenty years. Join Public Art staff on a walking tour to explore and learn the story behind some of the City’s most iconic and well-loved works. Please note: This tour requires standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The second offering takes place on September 17.
Presenter: Karl LeClair, Public Art Program Manager, Boise City Department of Arts and History
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 10, 10 a.m.-noon
Location: Begin and end at Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 30

Wine Production: From Grapes to Glass

The wine industry is complex and involves the integration of agriculture, food processing, business, and art. The challenges and opportunities faced in today’s wine industry are vast and variable due to increased globalization and market demands. This lecture will delve into the science and art of grape growing and wine production on a local and international scale. International trends and challenges in the wine industry will be discussed, including exploration of wine supply and demand, as well as key issues facing the industry at large.
Presenter: Kathryn House McClaskey, founder, House of Wine
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 10, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The History and Culture of Hobos

Making a living as traveling workers, the United States’ hobo population increased as the railroad system developed across the country. This lecture will provide an overview of the history and culture of hobos, including the initiation of hobo culture after the Civil War. The differences among hobos, tramps, and bums will be discussed as well as a day in the life of a hobo, hobo terminology, signage, and symbols, and the impact of economic conditions on hobo populations in the early 1900s.
Presenter: Walt Adams, retired corporate security manager
Date and time: Fri., Sept. 13, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

With a Song in My Heart

Embodied in both popular and classical music, vocal music has existed since the beginning of time. Throughout the centuries, some of the best-known vocal music has been transcribed for the piano—perhaps because of its “singing” quality. This course will focus on composers of diverse nationalities and represent numerous genres. Countries represented will include Russia, Hungary, France, Germany, Italy, and America, and genres will range from classical art song and opera to film scores and Broadway show tunes. After discussing and demonstrating memorable melodies, Dr. Parkinson will perform representative lyrical piano selections emanating from various regions through the ages.
Presenter: Dr. Del Parkinson, Professor of Music, Boise State University
Date and time: Fri., Sept. 13 and 20, 2-4 p.m.
Location: Morrison Center Recital Hall, Boise State Department of Music, 2201 Cesar Chavez Ln., Boise
Cost: $30

Downtown Public Art Walking Tour: Event Two

The City of Boise’s Department of Arts and History maintains a collection of over 700 works of public art. Downtown Boise boasts a robust concentration of works within the central business district and has been the focus of investment for the past twenty years. Join Public Art staff on a walking tour to explore and learn the story behind some of the City’s most iconic and well-loved works. Please note: This tour requires standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The first offering takes place on September 10.
Presenter: Karl LeClair, Public Art Program Manager, Boise City Department of Arts and History
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 17, 10 a.m.-noon
Location: Begin and end at Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 30

Signs of the West

Advertising signs narrate American social and cultural values by combining text and images. A zenith of sign design occurred between 1920 and 1960 when neon technology inspired businesses—from motels to muffler shops—to sell themselves creatively in light and color. Examples of this vintage roadside art form remain in place today in small towns and cities across the Intermountain West. Take a virtual road trip of landscape and history as Dr. O’Connor shares her documentary photographs of mid-century regional signs and narrates the stories that these cultural markers tell us about our past and present.
Presenter: Dr. Jacky O’Connor, Director, Public Culture Initiative, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 17, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

A Lifetime with Golden Eagles

Join master falconers Joe and Cordi Atkinson as they share their experiences of rehabilitating young golden eagles for eventual release back to the wild. Through no fault of their own, these young eagles find themselves in rehabilitation centers, missing a critical learning period of following their parents to learn survival skills. In conjunction with the California Foundation for Birds of Prey, the Atkinsons have developed a low-stress training method using falconry techniques and have established a team of falconers to serve as surrogate parents. This lecture will also discuss the challenges golden eagles face in the wild and share some of the speakers’ experiences working on film projects.
Presenters: Joe and Cordi Atkinson, master falconers
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 17, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Idaho Wine Tour: Event One

Harvest season is the perfect time of year to visit Idaho’s wine country! Join us as we tour three local wineries—Indian Creek Winery, Vizcaya Winery, and Telaya Wine Co.—and learn about the origins and future of the wine industry. Transportation, wine tastings, and boxed lunches are included in the cost of this tour. Members will have the opportunity to purchase wine at each location. Please note: Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The second offering takes place on September 25. Cancellations made within 21 days of this event will not receive a refund.
Presenter: Kathy Johnson, owner, Winery Seekers Wine Tours
Date and time: Wed., Sept. 18, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Location: Begin and end at the Yanke Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise
Cost: $120
Capacity: 40

Clinical Trials: Neurodegenerative Diseases

This lecture will provide insight into how drugs are tested in clinical trials and ultimately approved or not by the FDA.  Alzheimer’s disease will serve as an example to explain the challenges of finding effective drugs—especially for treating central nervous system disorders. The symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer’s disease will be discussed along with how disease-modifying medications have fared in the clinical trial process. After this lecture, members can expect to have a better understanding of the cost of medications, the clinical trial approval process, and the hurdles to finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.
Presenter: Dr. Troy Rohn, Professor of Biological Sciences, Boise State University
Date and time: Fri., Sept. 20, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Language Throughout the Lifespan

This course will walk members through the journey of language acquisition, usage, and decay through the lifespan. The main themes of this course include how children acquire their first language(s) and how the acquisition of a subsequent language is similar or different in children and adults. The course will also cover bilingualism, language disorders, language impairments, and the mechanisms of the brain responsible for language.
Presenter: Dr. Michal Temkin Martinez, Associate Professor of Linguistics, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Sept. 23 and 30, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $25

Endangered Languages of Idaho

The United Nations has declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. This timely lecture on a study of the endangered languages of Idaho tribes will use research and findings to provide a regional context to a complex global issue.
Presenter: Dr. Tim Thornes, 2018 Osher Faculty Grant Recipient and Associate Professor of Linguistics, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 24, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Redistricting and Gerrymandering Across the States

This lecture will focus on the redistricting process used to draw boundary lines for state and congressional districts. We will cover the different ways that states draw lines, the legal requirements for doing this, partisan gerrymandering, and the consequences of different approaches to redistricting. Reform efforts and the future of redistricting will also be discussed.
Presenters: Dr. Gary Moncrief, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Boise State University; and Dr. Jeffrey Lyons, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Sept. 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Idaho Wine Tour: Event Two

Harvest season is the perfect time of year to visit Idaho’s wine country! Join us as we tour three local wineries—Indian Creek Winery, Vizcaya Winery, and Telaya Wine Co.—and learn about the origins and future of the wine industry. Transportation, wine tastings, and boxed lunches are included in the cost of this tour. Members will have the opportunity to purchase wine at each location. Please note: Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The first offering takes place on September 18. Cancellations made within 21 days of this event will not receive a refund.
Presenter: Kathy Johnson, owner, Winery Seekers Wine Tours
Date and time: Wed., Sept. 25, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Location: Begin and end at the Yanke Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise
Cost: $120
Capacity: 40

The Great Basin Murders: Weaving an Identity for the Unidentified

The Great Basin Murders, a grouping of unsolved homicides, occurred in the Western United States from the 1970s to the 1990s. To commemorate the unidentified victims, artist Lily Lee is handweaving burial shrouds using data from these cases to create special, dedicated patterns. Her work seeks to give each victim a gesture of respect that was previously not afforded to them by focusing her work on the identities of the victims and not on the perpetrators. This lecture will explore Lee’s method of researching these cases, her consideration of the greater social issues that cold cases represent, and her artistic processes of designing, handweaving, fiber reactive dyeing, and embroidery.
Presenter: Lily Lee, Assistant Professor of Art, Boise State University
Date and time: Thu., Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

The Illegal Wildlife Trade

This lecture will examine the global scope of the illegal wildlife trade, particularly the trade of elephant ivory, rhino horn, tiger bone and pelts, and pangolin scales and meat. The detrimental impact the trade has on human beings and the various species will be discussed, drawing a connection between our future and the future of those species that we have pushed to the brink of extinction.
Presenter: Harry Peachey, General Curator, Zoo Boise
Date and time: Fri., Sept. 27, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Genetic Engineering: Past, Present, and Future

Humans have been guiding evolutionary processes for thousands of years. This lecture will discuss historical examples of gene manipulation by humans—before we even knew what genes were—and the modern efforts and tools used to manipulate genetic sequences. Finally, the future of genetic engineering will be discussed.
Presenter: Dr. Allan Albig, Associate Professor of Biology, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Sept. 30, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Starting in October

The Mammals!

Humans are mammals. What can our fellow mammals teach us about ourselves? We share similar genes, anatomical systems, physiological mechanisms, and even some behaviors. Learn about their (our) incredible origins, adaptations, diversity, behaviors, and ecological interactions. This course will explore the main groups of mammals, including primates, and many applications for Homo sapiens.
Presenter: Dr. Eric Yensen, Professor Emeritus of Biology, The College of Idaho; Adjunct graduate faculty, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $55

Contemporary Russia: Geography and People

Every country is more complicated than the picture we see on our news channels. This course will reveal the complexity of Russia by delving into current issues occupying Russian society—especially the political opposition and new trends in paternalism—and use recent political events in the Russian Far East as a way to open discussion of regions around Moscow and beyond. Russian living spaces and trends in urban development will be described, in part through looking at the spectacle of the World Cup, and recent events and trends in Russia’s relationship with other countries will be covered.
Presenter: Dr. Megan Dixon, Professor of Geography and Environmental Studies, The College of Idaho
Date and time: Tue., Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $55

The Makings of an Orchestral Performance

Join the Serenata Orchestra to discover how their performances come to life. Pre-rehearsal lectures will provide insight into the selected music, followed immediately by a live rehearsal. Some seats for members will be right inside the orchestra! Listen and learn throughout the rehearsal process as the musicians play and explain how rehearsals influence their final performance.
Presenter: Jennifer Drake, Music Director, Serenata Orchestra
Date and time: Tue., Oct. 1 and 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Location: Boise High School Music Building, 1010 W. Washington St., Boise
Cost: $30
Capacity: 100

Introduction to Acupuncture

Despite the practice of acupuncture existing for over 3,000 years, its presence in the Western Hemisphere is young. This lecture will serve as an introduction to acupuncture from both Eastern and Western perspectives, including an overview of diagnosing disease in a Traditional Chinese Medicine model. A brief history of acupuncture and its path to the Western world will be discussed as well as some proposed mechanisms of action, different types and tools of practice, and common uses of acupuncture. Finally, we will discuss the inherent challenges of researching this field and what has been learned.
Presenter: Elizabeth Atnip, MD, Resident Physician, Family Medicine Residency of Idaho
Date and time: Wed., Oct. 2, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Billy Wilder: Nobody’s Perfect

The Mexican Muralists

“Los Tres Grandes” (The Three Great Ones)—Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros—re-introduced fresco painting to Mexico in the 1920s. Their subject matter was political, nationalistic, social, and rooted in history and folklore. They traveled and painted walls throughout the United States, introducing “portable murals” and influencing a generation of American painters from Pollock to Rothko to Shahn. Other less well-known artists like Zakheim and Arnautoff were caught in this movement in the days of the WPA Federal Art Project and the construction of the Coit Tower in San Francisco. The American Regionalist painters also took notice. Eventually, the interest in murals faded and gave way to Abstract Expressionism, but the influence of these great artists continues.
Presenter: Dario Bollacasa, author and Boise Art Museum docent
Date and time: Thu., Oct. 3, 10, and 17, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

A Brief History of Science: Gravity Edition

We tend to think of the force of gravity as well understood; after all, we experience it every day. In reality, it is still quite mysterious. On September 14, 2015, gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes 1.4 billion years ago were detected as they passed by Earth. That is the latest chapter in our ongoing discoveries about gravity and how it works. This course will trace how the human ideas behind the force of gravity have progressed through history and will describe how gravity works, what we know now, and what questions are still to be answered.
Presenter: Chuck Folkner, retired Principal Systems Architect, Starbucks Coffee Company
Dates and times: Thu., Oct. 3 and 10, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Boise River Enhancement Network

This course will provide a basic background of the ecological and social role of the Boise River. A novel ecosystem, the Boise River has influenced vegetation and trail formation while being influenced itself by biological and recreational functions. How can community activities enhance the Boise River, and how does one define enhancement? How do floods influence the structure of the Boise River and recreational structures? How does community involvement in projects and activities along the river enrich the community as a whole? Discover the answers to these questions in this course.
Presenter: Dr. Roger Rosentreter, retired botanist, Bureau of Land Management
Date and time: Fri., Oct. 4, 11, and 18, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

The Oregon Trail Across Idaho

Thousands of emigrants trudged across the southern Idaho desert on their way to Oregon for free land. Many wrote diaries of their journey and the experiences they encountered along the way. The Oregon Trail across Idaho still contains hundreds of miles of pristine ruts just as emigrants saw them 170 years ago. This course will follow the Oregon Trail across the mountains, deserts, and rivers of Idaho—including the deadly North Alternate Oregon Trail. Using maps, photographs, and emigrant diary quotes, members will experience the humor and despair of emigrants as they traveled through the most difficult portion of their journey.
Presenter: Jerry Eichhorst, president and webmaster, Idaho Chapter of Oregon-California Trails Association
Date and time: Fri., Oct. 4 and 11, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Idaho State Archives Tour: Event One

Join the Idaho State Archives for a behind-the-scenes tour into how the Archives collects, preserves, and provides access to Idaho’s historical records. In addition to preserving materials from Idaho’s history, the Archives is home to Abraham Lincoln: His Legacy in Idaho—an exhibition featuring more than 200 artifacts that reveal Lincoln’s intriguing connection to the 43rd state. Members will walk the secure storage vaults, experience the Lincoln exhibition, and learn how to care for their own personal papers, records, and photographs in a brief lecture. Please note:Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The second offering takes place on October 21.
Presenters: Layce Johnson, Collections Archivist, Idaho State Historical Society and David Matte, State Archivist, Idaho State Historical Society
Date and time: Mon., Oct. 7, 10 a.m.-noon
Location: 2205 Old Penitentiary Rd., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 40

Learn to Weave with the Boise Art Museum

Learn to weave! Explore materials, techniques, and textures while gathering inspiration from the Boise Art Museum’s collection. This workshop will focus on experimentation as members will learn to construct their own loom and create multiple fiber objects to take home with them. Basic techniques, composition construction, and texture exploration will be introduced. No prior experience is necessary and all levels are welcome. Materials will be provided and are included in the cost of this workshop. Please note: Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, we are offering this workshop twice, as noted below.
Date and time:
Workshop One: Tue., Oct. 8, 15, 22, and 29, 2:30-4:30 p.m.
Workshop Two: Wed., Oct. 9, 16, 23, and 30, 2:30-4:30 p.m.
Location: Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Dr., Boise
Cost: $55
Capacity: 25 each workshop

Disney Goes to War

After the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, the Walt Disney Studios lot was invaded by the United States Army. Disney not only housed the Army for months during WWII at their Burbank studio, but Disney artists developed propaganda films, aircraft nose art, and training materials for the military. This lecture will present one of the most prolific, though not most profitable, times at the Disney studios and uncover Disney’s secret weapon that improved the morale of troops on every front, including the home front.
Presenter: Pamela Kleibrink Thompson, founding member, Women in Animation
Date and time: Wed., Oct. 9, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Volcano Storytelling: Tales from Four Active Volcanoes

Documentary filmmaker Zach Voss and Boise State geophysics professor Jeffrey Johnson have teamed up to share the exciting world of volcano science with the public. With support from National Geographic, the pair traveled to Italy, Japan, Guatemala, and Ecuador to film research teams monitoring eruptions and conducting volcano research with cutting-edge technologies. Join Zach and Jeff as they introduce volcano science with engaging visuals and stories.
Presenters: Zach Voss, film director and cinematographer; and Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, Associate Professor of Geosciences, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Oct. 14, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Idaho Water Matters

This lecture will present case studies to describe hydrologic and water quality issues unique to Idaho. Topics to be presented include trace metal transport in the Coeur d’Alene mining district and subsequent deposition in Lake Coeur d’Alene, mercury bioaccumulation in the aquatic environment of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, and the changing character of spring snowmelt runoff in Idaho as a result of a warming climate. Each of these investigations will be described along with pertinent findings and conclusions.
Presenter: Greg Clark, retired Associate Director and Supervisory Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey Idaho Water Science Center
Date and time: Mon., Oct. 14, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Care: New Thoughts on Surgical Repair

Explore the 40-year history of foot and ankle care and treatment with Michael Coughlin, MD, an expert in modern foot and ankle surgery. This lecture will discuss arthritis of the foot and ankle, tendon injuries including Achilles ruptures and acute and chronic forefoot problems, and both conservative and surgical solutions. Special attention will be paid to the past and present levels of care in Boise, the United States, and the world.
Presenter: Michael Coughlin, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, Saint Alphonsus
Date and time: Wed., Oct. 16, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

GMOs: Technology, Regulation, Utilization, and Controversy

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in our foods and environment are a frequent topic of dinner table discussion and media attention. How well do you understand GMOs? This course will present the technology scientists use to develop various GMO foods, explore the role of government agencies in regulating GMOs, and objectively discuss how the controversy in the developed world affects food options here and in other countries. Efficient, sustainable, and environmentally responsible agriculture is vital to providing food for a growing world population. Conventional, GMO, and organic production technologies will be compared as all three contribute to producing healthy, abundant, and safe foods.
Presenter: Sharie Fitzpatrick, Senior Regulatory Manager, J.R. Simplot Company
Date and time: Thu., Oct. 17, 24, and 31, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Connecting Computer Science Principles and Music

The field of computer science touches almost every aspect of modern society. Coding is an essential practice in this field. This lecture will use music combined with coding to give a musical introduction to computer science. It will end with an explanation of the seven principles of computer science: creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the Internet, and global impact.
Presenter: Dr. Amit Jain, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Boise State University
Date and time: Fri, Oct. 18, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Idaho State Archives Tour: Event Two

Join the Idaho State Archives for a behind-the-scenes tour into how the Archives collects, preserves, and provides access to Idaho’s historical records. In addition to preserving materials from Idaho’s history, the Archives is home to Abraham Lincoln: His Legacy in Idaho—an exhibition featuring more than 200 artifacts that reveal Lincoln’s intriguing connection to the 43rd state. Members will walk the secure storage vaults, experience the Lincoln exhibition, and learn how to care for their own personal papers, records, and photographs in a brief lecture. Please note: Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The first offering takes place on October 7.
Presenters: Danielle Grundel, Photo Archivist, Idaho State Historical Society and David Matte, State Archivist, Idaho State Historical Society
Date and time: Mon., Oct. 21, 10 a.m.-noon
Location: 2205 Old Penitentiary Rd., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 40

Fantastical Places in Myth and Folklore

This course will explore the “otherworld” as portrayed in stories throughout time and across cultures. Members will encounter diverse myths and folktales featuring the lands of fairies, gods, and much more. Modern pop culture takes on ancient otherworld themes will be studied as well as the influence of evolving scientific thought on otherworld narratives. Finally, the course will examine the impact of these places on those who visit them, ultimately asking, “What do these stories reveal about the human encounter with mystery?”
Presenter: Tracey Kindall, Director, McCall Arts and Humanities Council
Date and time: Wed., Oct. 23, 30, Nov. 6, and 13, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

The Greatest Turning Points in Human History

This course will examine some of the most significant developments in the transformation of human civilization over the past 70,000 years. It will begin with a look at prehistoric transitions including the Cognitive and Agricultural Revolutions. It will then discuss the rise of the state within the context of Eastern and Western civilizations and the role religious belief systems played in establishing political and social order. Moving into the modern era, the implications of the Scientific and Humanist Revolutions will be presented, as well as the transformation of human society caused by the Age of Discovery and the Industrial Revolution. Finally, it will peer into the future as we head into the age of artificial intelligence and nanotechnology.
Presenter: Ralph Bild, retired CIA Intelligence Analyst and high school economics and history teacher
Date and time: Thu., Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, and 14, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45

The Big Band Era

New York City in the mid to late 1930s was an unparalleled scene of musical excitement. Soon, the whole country would be caught up in dancing to the swing music of the Big Band era. Like all mass movements in history, various elements combined to set the stage for the emergence of this joyful form of artistic and cultural expression. From race relations and Depression-era politics to the strong personalities of the many bandleaders and their varied motivations, the Big Band era offers fascinating vantage points from which to understand a major portion of the 20th Century. Filled with great music and interesting insights, this lecture is designed to help the listener both celebrate and more deeply understand the music of this important era.
Presenter: Eric Collett, owner and principal, A Mind for All Seasons, LLC
Date and time: Fri., Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

CPR: Workshop One

Back by popular demand! Learn the lifesaving skills of CPR, AED use, and how to handle severe choking issues in adults, children, and infants. Members will practice CPR techniques using mannequins, barrier devices for ventilation, and AED trainers. After completing this training, members will receive an official certification card from the National Academy of Safety and Health which is valid for two years. Please note: Mannequins will be placed on the floor for this training. Kneeling and standing up from the floor is to be expected. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this workshop is offered twice. The second offering takes place on December 4.
Presenter: Dan Hohler, Health Solutions of Idaho
Date and time: Fri., Oct. 25, 1-4 p.m.
Cost: $40
Capacity: 20

Idaho’s Native Orchids

Idaho is home to twenty-eight species of native orchids that occur in a surprising array of colors, shapes, and sizes. This course will discuss the unique traits of the orchid family, identification of Idaho species, research on rare orchids, and how to search for orchids in their native habitats—some of which can be found in the mountains above Boise and the valleys near Cascade and McCall.
Presenter: Dr. Cecilia Lynn Kinter, Lead Botanist, Idaho Department of Fish and Game
Date and time: Mon., Oct. 28, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Dry Creek Experimental Watershed: A Boise Resource

The Dry Creek Experimental Watershed (DCEW), founded in 1998, has expanded from a research-focused outdoor laboratory to additionally serve as a community and education resource. DCEW is equipped with numerous weather, stream, and soil monitoring sites across the elevation gradient. This lecture will present DCEW’s real-time graphs of weather, stream flow, and soil moisture conditions and explain how community members can use this data. Additional resources in progress will also be presented, including Boise Front air quality, trail conditions, and Boise State’s on-campus weather station and environmental sensing innovation lab.
Presenter: Dr. Jim McNamara, 2018 Osher Faculty Grant Recipient and Professor of Geosciences, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Oct. 28, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Evolution of Birds

Did you know that not all dinosaurs are extinct? Some live among us today! This course will explore the evolution of dinosaur lineages that gave rise to birds and explain the features they share with our modern day avians. Particular focus will be given to the evolution of flight and plumage, the latest theories about the origins of flight, and supporting fossil evidence.
Presenter: Heidi Ware Carlisle, Education and Outreach Director, Intermountain Bird Observatory
Date and time: Wed., Oct. 30, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Starting in November

The Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s: Lecture Two

Cases of Alzheimer’s disease are predicted to increase nearly 30% in Idaho over the next six years, making it one of the top concerns of seniors in the Gem state. Over the last several years, some researchers have made significant efforts to explore multimodal approaches to treating Alzheimer’s patients in early stages or addressing cognitive decline before it becomes severe enough to warrant a dementia diagnosis. This lecture will explore this important area of research and offer ideas about ways you may be able to improve your cognitive functioning and reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on September 6.
Presenter: Eric Collett, owner and principal, A Mind for All Seasons, LLC
Date and time: Fri., Nov. 1, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

40 Years of HIV/AIDS: From Life Ending to Life Changing

In the summer of 1981, an immunologist from Los Angeles and a dermatologist from New York reported some unusual findings in the Centers for Disease Control’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Both reports described a new syndrome affecting homosexual male patients and are now considered to be the first described cases of HIV. Worldwide, 36 million people are infected with HIV—24 million of whom live in Africa. This lecture will examine the origins of HIV, its global epidemiology, scientific breakthroughs and stumbles, the impact of HIV/AIDS on human culture, medical practitioners’ successful global response, and the challenges remaining in the fight against this stubbornly tenacious virus.
Presenter: Clay Roscoe, MD, faculty member, Family Medicine Residency of Idaho
Date and time: Fri., Nov. 1, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Lieutenant Nun: A Performance

In the spring of 2018, Dr. Mac Test explained the excruciating endeavor of translating a 400-year-old play into English for the first time in history. Now completely translated and ready for stage production, Comedia Famosa De La Monja Alférez (The Lieutenant Nun) follows the true-life history of Catalina de Erauso, a Basque woman who escaped a nunnery at 18, cut off her hair, dressed as a man, and jumped aboard a ship bound for the New World. Join Dr. Test and two London-based actors for a short performance of a scene, a discussion with the actors, and an introduction to the play.
Presenter: Dr. Mac Test, Professor and Chair of English, Boise State University
Date and time: Sat., Nov. 2, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

A Journey Down the Snake: Understanding Idaho’s Great River

Back by popular demand! This course will trace the Snake River’s thousand-mile path from its headwaters in a remote corner of Yellowstone to its end as a series of slack water reservoirs in eastern Washington. We will explore how the wild Snake was transformed into an engine of Idaho’s economy and how nature still holds a place along an altered river. Class discussions will cover ecology, history, water rights and management, the epic conflicts, and the compromises that have shaped Idaho’s great river. Please note: This is a repeat of Will Whelan’s fall 2018 course.
Presenter: Will Whelan, JD, Director of Government Relations, The Nature Conservancy
Date and time: Mon., Nov. 4, 11, 18, and 25, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45

History of Chinese Characters and Calligraphy

Extending back more than 6,000 years, the Chinese writing system remains unique among all other systems. This lecture will present the origins and evolution of Chinese writing systems and explain the possible motivation behind the invention of Chinese writing.
Presenter: Robert (Guowang) Luo, The Confucius Institute, University of Idaho
Date and time: Mon., Nov. 4, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Geopolitical Importance of Ukraine

Focusing on the importance of Ukraine to Russia and the West, this course will center on a period of conflict between Russia and Ukraine from the 1930s through the present time, examining differences and similarities in language and culture along the way.
Presenter: Connie Collins, former Ukraine Peace Corp volunteer
Date and time: Tue., Nov. 5, 12, 19, and 26, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45

The Most Significant Invention of the 20th Century

What do computers, smartphones, and the Internet have in common? Transistors—by the billions. Responsible for “The Third Industrial Revolution,” or the Digital Age, these tiny devices bring in billions of dollars from consumers and are found in everything from your laptop to your pets. This lecture will discuss how transistors were invented, their significance, and how they are used. In understanding the transistor, members will gain a better understanding of how gadgets work in the world around them. Please note: This is a repeat of Paul Nelson’s spring 2017 lecture.
Presenter: Paul Nelson, retired Senior Engineer, DRAM Research and Development, Micron Technology
Date and time: Tue., Nov. 5, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Organic Food: To Eat or Not to Eat?

Every time we go to the grocery store, we must decide whether to buy a “regular” apple or pay a little extra for an “organic” apple. For many of us, this decision is based on whether or not we think organic food is somehow healthier than food that is conventionally grown. Despite many strong feelings on both sides, scientific evidence is lacking to fully support either view. This lecture will aim to clarify the meaning of the organic label, describe the state of the science regarding the health benefits of organic food, and reveal results from Dr. Curl’s own work that influence this conversation.
Presenter: Dr. Cynthia Curl, 2016 Osher Faculty Grant Recipient and Assistant Professor of Community and Environmental Health, Boise State University
Date and time: Wed., Nov. 6, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Medieval Manuscript Culture

The information technology of the Middle Ages revolved around writing books by hand. Such manuscript codices were prized for being conduits of knowledge about the physical world, histories of kingdoms, and the heavens above. Their rubricated layouts, gilded decorations, and miniature illustrations provided ways for readers to interact with their texts beyond just the script. This course will survey the types of books that were illuminated for different kinds of medieval readers across Europe and the Mediterranean and will consider the cultural circumstances of their production and reception.
Presenter: Dr. Elizabeth Hunt, Adjunct Faculty in the University Foundations Program, Boise State University
Date and time: Thu., Nov. 7, 14, and 21, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Mining in Idaho: A Community Guide

The mining industry helped put Idaho on the map. While it left behind a long and colorful history in the west, mining has often left behind scarred landscapes and contaminated waterways. This lecture will provide a brief history of mining in Idaho, discuss the unintended consequences to our environment, and showcase how mining practices, companies, and regulations have—and in some cases have not—evolved over time. We will also review some controversial proposals for new mines in Idaho, discuss the potential benefits and risks to local communities, and highlight ways communities can get involved in shaping these projects.
Presenter: John Robison, Public Lands Director, Idaho Conservation League
Date and time: Fri., Nov. 8, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Lessons from High Water on the Boise River: An Update

Boise River Flood Control District #10 is Idaho’s most active Flood Control District. This lecture will provide an update of the activities following the historic 2017 flooding, discuss the Boise River “System” and how it works, and explain what the District is doing today to manage the Boise River for future flood mitigation needs.
Presenters: Mike Dimmick, District Manager, Boise River Flood Control District #10, and Steve Sweet, PE, District Engineer, Boise River Flood Control District #10
Date and time: Fri., Nov. 8, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Chinese Calligraphy Workshop

Learn basic Chinese calligraphy skills including how to hold and position the brush, apply pressure, and create characters to create a beautiful calligraphy piece. Materials will be provided and are included in the cost of this workshop.
Presenter: Robert (Guowang) Luo, The Confucius Institute, University of Idaho
Date and time: Mon., Nov. 11, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25     
Capacity: 30

Sacred Seeds: Native Myths and English Literature

After the “discovery” of America, the Western and Eastern Hemispheres were brought together on a large scale by trade ships, helping to create the global landscape we take for granted today. New World plants were central to this formative moment in global history. The agriculture of indigenous peoples mythically and materially shaped English society and, subsequently, its literature in new and startling ways. This lecture will discuss New World plants—tobacco, amaranth, guaiacum, and the prickly pear cactus—and their associated Native myths as they moved across the Atlantic and into English literature.
Presenter: Dr. Mac Test, Professor and Chair of English, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Nov. 12, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Introduction to Cybersecurity

This lecture will provide a high-level overview of cybersecurity and its role in business, government, and everyday personal computing. What should citizens know to protect their data and identity online? How do we balance connecting to the Internet with making sure our devices and data are secure? In addition to answering these questions, this lecture will present an introduction to the “Internet of Things,” mobile communication devices, a brief history of major cybersecurity developments, and a look into what the future may hold for this field.
Presenter: Toby King, Senior Vice President of Information Technology, CapEd Credit Union
Date and time: Wed., Nov. 13, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Northern Goshawk Ecology and Conservation in the Intermountain West

For the past nine years, Robert Miller has led the study of Northern Goshawks within the Minidoka Ranger District of the Sawtooth National Forest. He and his students have studied habitat needs, behavior, human disturbance, predator-prey dynamics, disease ecology, gene flow, and the impact these variables have on the population structure and dynamics of this secretive forest raptor. Their studies have resulted in five scientific publications with four more in process. This lecture will share what Robert’s team has learned, where their research is headed, and the challenges and rewards of pursuing a species that is elegantly regal yet willing to fight dirty when needed.
Presenter: Robert Miller, Research Biologist, Intermountain Bird Observatory
Date and time: Fri., Nov. 15, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Boise Airport Public Art Tour

The City of Boise’s Department of Arts and History maintains a collection of over 700 works of public art. The Boise Airport generates its own percent-for-art budget and hosts an impressive concentration of works for the public that are accessible pre-security. The collection consists of a variety of works that are integrated into the architecture of the terminal, grounds, and parking structures. Join Public Art staff on a walking tour to explore the grounds and learn the story behind the works that serve to greet and welcome both residents and visitors alike. Please note: This tour requires standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice, as noted below.
Presenter: Karl LeClair, Public Art Program Manager, Boise City Department of Arts and History
Date and time:
Event One: Fri., Nov. 15, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Event Two: Fri., Nov. 15, 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Location: 3201 W. Airport Way, Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 30 each event

The Case for Contemporary Theater

Explore the world of contemporary theater and learn why it is a vital art form—especially in the Treasure Valley. In partnership with Boise Contemporary Theater (BCT), actress Jessica Ires Morris and Managing Director Ben Burdick will use one show from BCT’s 2019-2020 season to discuss how contemporary work engages audiences, sparks conversation, and invites us to connect as a community. Members from BCT’s production team and artistic staff will join this course to walk members through the process of bringing a script to life on the stage.
Presenter: Jessica Ires Morris, Adjunct Faculty of Theater, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Nov. 18, 25, and Dec. 2, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Inside the Boise Airport

With a mission to provide a world-class gateway to connect people with the most livable city in the country, the Boise Airport is an economic engine for the Treasure Valley. This lecture will provide insight into the operation and long-term planning related to the Boise Airport and its four key business segments: commercial passenger air service, air cargo, general aviation, and military and commercial/industrial land development.
Presenter: Rebecca Hupp, Director, Boise Airport
Date and time: Tue., Nov. 19, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Beethoven String Quartet Cycle: Performance Two

The year 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth; orchestras and ensembles around the world are already planning celebratory events in honor of the occasion. Join violinist Laurel Tally, violist Jennifer Drake, cellist Brian Hodges, and other string players as they perform two quartets—Op. 18, No. 2 and Op. 59, No. 2—in an intimate classroom setting. This unique experience will span from September 2019 to May 2021, and all 16 of Beethoven’s quartets will be played by the end of the cycle. Please note: Each performance requires separate registration. The third performance in the cycle will take place in February 2020.
Date and time: Sat., Nov. 23, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25
Capacity: 170

Starting in December

Arduino Nano Ornament Workshop

This workshop will allow members to create an LED-lit holiday ornament using Arduino Nano, an open-source electronic development platform. Members will learn just enough electronics to wire a breadboard, connect an LED light to resistors, and apply coding principles to program the LED to blink and change colors. Once completed, members may take home their ornament. No prior programming experience is necessary. Materials will be provided and are included in the cost of this workshop.
Presenter: Marilyn Escue, former Software Architect, Motorola Networks and Motorola Mobile Devices
Date and time: Mon., Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $40
Capacity: 20

CPR: Workshop Two

Back by popular demand! Learn the lifesaving skills of CPR, AED use, and how to handle severe choking issues in adults, children, and infants. Members will practice CPR techniques using mannequins, barrier devices for ventilation, and AED trainers. After completing this training, members will receive an official certification card from the National Academy of Safety and Health which is valid for two years. Please note: Mannequins will be placed on the floor for this training. Kneeling and standing up from the floor is to be expected. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this workshop is offered twice. The first offering takes place on October 25.
Presenter: Dan Hohler, Health Solutions of Idaho
Date and time: Wed., Dec. 4, 1-4 p.m.
Cost: $40
Capacity: 20

2019 Winter Celebration

Enjoy a special evening to celebrate the holiday season and the end of another successful fall semester. Mingle with fellow Osher Institute members while enjoying food and refreshments, a short program, live music, and a slideshow of photos from the year. Please note: This event is free, but registration is required. Registered members are welcome to bring a guest.
Date and time: Wed., Dec. 11, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Location: Simplot Ballroom, Boise State Student Union Building
Cost: Free, but registration is required
Capacity: 400

Special Interest Groups

Befriend Your Cell Phone

Are you frustrated when your cell phone doesn’t work for you? Learn how to sequence keystrokes to find that favorite photo, organize mail, pay bills online, and solve other problems by collaborating with fellow Osher members. Through scheduled half-hour lectures and small group interactions, you may fall in love with your cell phone. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the meeting locations.
Facilitator: Marilee Haynes, Osher member
Meetings: First and third Friday of each month, 10-11:30 a.m.
Capacity: 40

Conversational Spanish

Maintain your Spanish skills by conversing with fellow Osher members, completely in Spanish, for approximately one hour. A basic level of Spanish vocabulary and grammar is strongly recommended in order to participate in this SIG. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the next meeting date. Please note: This SIG meets at two different locations throughout the month, as indicated below.
Facilitator: Roy Schiele, Osher member
Meetings and Locations:
1st and 3rd Thursday: 10:30 a.m. at the Library! at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Dr., Boise
2nd and 4th Thursday: 11 a.m. at the Garden City Public Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City

First Friday Astronomy Lectures at Boise State

Interested in planets, space exploration, and life elsewhere in the universe? Members of this SIG will receive advance notifications of First Friday Astronomy Lectures hosted by Dr. Brian Jackson and the Boise State Department of Physics. This series will feature guest lecturers who will speak on a variety of subjects related to planetary exploration and cosmic evolution. Weather permitting, stargazing will take place on the roof of the Education Building in the newly refurbished Boise State Observatory. Please note: “First Friday Lectures” are not exclusively for Osher members and are free and open to the public. Seating is available on a first-come-first-served basis. The observatory is not ADA compliant, but telescopes will be available at ground level near the observatory. Questions can be sent to Prof. Jackson at bjackson@boisestate.edu.
Facilitator: Dr. Brian Jackson, planetary astronomer and Assistant Professor of Physics, Boise State University
Meetings: First Friday of each month, August through December, 7:30 p.m.
Location: Room 112, Science and Education Building, Boise State University

Hiking in the Foothills

Come explore Boise’s wonderful Ridge to Rivers trail system on moderately strenuous hikes of one-and-a-half to two hours in duration. Start from a different trailhead each week to experience the beauty of the open space surrounding our city. Information with details on date, time, and location will be emailed in advance of the planned hike.
Facilitator: Mike Merz, Osher member and Boise State Emeritus

Make Your Family Tree Better

Meet with other Osher members to discuss common questions and issues involved with family history research and genealogy. Discover new ways to find solutions to your research challenges, hear other members’ experiences, and share your own findings with the group. After you register, you will receive an email with details on meeting dates and locations.
Facilitator: Thad Webster, Osher member
Capacity: 40

Memoir Writing

Join Osher Institute members who are interested in writing memoirs—a collection of memories that an individual writes about moments or events. We meet for two hours on the first and third Friday afternoons of each month, with peer-led rotating facilitators. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the next meeting date.
Facilitator: Merilee Marsh, Osher member
Meetings: First and third Friday of each month, 1-3 p.m.
Location: Library! at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Dr., Boise
Capacity: 30

(Mostly) Foreign Films at The Flicks

Join Osher members who enjoy films—both foreign and American—by gathering at The Flicks, Boise’s premier independent movie theater. Following each film, members will have the opportunity to meet in the theater for a short discussion. An email with the selected film’s title, description, and showtime will be sent in advance of the selected date. Please note: Due to robust interest in this SIG and the limited size of the theater, the film may sell out. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
Facilitator: Patricia Alpine, Osher member
Meetings: One Monday a month, September through December, around 5 p.m.
Location: 646 W. Fulton St., Boise

Reading Writers… Paired!

Take part in a casual and exploratory book group—something different than the typical format. Each month, members in this SIG choose two books that have something in common such as era, location, or theme.  Members can choose to read one book or the other, and both works are discussed at the next meeting. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the next meeting date.
Facilitator: Carol Delaney, Osher member
Meetings: Third Wednesday of each month, 2 p.m.
Location: KeyBank, 875 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise
Capacity: 22

Walking the Greenbelt

Take part in the beauty of the Boise River Greenbelt with other members who want to get exercise while enjoying the sights and sounds of nature. Moderate to brisk walks that begin and end at the Yanke Building will be the core of this SIG.
Facilitator: River Wilson, Osher member
Meetings: Mondays and Fridays, September 6 through November 29, 10-11 a.m.
Location: 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. Meet on the east side of the building.

Back To Top