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Effective immediately, all Osher Institute offerings, meetings, and Special Interest Groups (SIGs) that remain in the spring semester have been canceled. The Spring Social on June 3 is also canceled.

Be well and take good care of yourself. The Osher Institute staff will be working remotely in the upcoming weeks, but we will still have access to email and the office voicemail. Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions by emailing osher@boisestate.edu or calling
(208) 426-6554.

 

Registration is required to attend all Osher Institute offerings.

To register:

Registration for Spring 2020 opened on Tuesday, December 3.

To view our guest, weather, and cancellation and refund policies, please visit our Registration Information page.

Spring 2020 Offerings

Starting in January

How to Write A Short Story: Part II

Our spring 2019 workshop, “How to Write a Short Story,” delved into story structure and how to write a short story based on the traditional narrative arc. In “How to Write a Short Story—Part II,” we’ll examine other narrative structures, theme development, techniques for creating tension and suspense, and work on writing indelible scenes with a bias toward action. Members will draft the early scenes of a new short story, practicing the writing craft ideas we discuss in class. This workshop is for anyone who wants to learn more about the art of short story writing and for anyone who enjoys discussing writing craft. Please note: Members are welcome to attend this workshop regardless if they attended the spring 2019 workshop.
Presenter: Susan Rowe, MFA
Date and time: Tue. and Thu., Jan. 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, and 23, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $125
Capacity: 20

Will Rogers: The World’s First Multimedia Star: Course One

Join Will Rogers historian and writer Kurt Orzeck as he retraces the life of one of the most iconic Americans of the twentieth century. Learn about the epic adventures of this humorous and lovable vaudeville performer who became Hollywood’s highest-paid film actor as well as America’s most widely syndicated newspaper columnist and radio broadcaster. This course will also discuss Rogers’ wide range of friendships, from his pet calf Sara to Charles Lindbergh to Wiley Post, a one-eyed pilot with whom he died in a tragic plane crash. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this course is offered twice. The second offering begins on April 22.
Presenter: Kurt Orzeck, freelance writer, editor, and blogger
Date and time: Wed., Jan. 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

Classical Mythology in Ancient Greece and Rome

The course will cover ancient Greek creation myths, adventures and peccadilloes of the Olympian gods and goddesses, amazing feats of heroes and demigods, and how the Romans stole nearly all of it. In each myth, we will explore why the Greeks created the story and what purpose it served in their culture. Major themes will be discussed and several mythical events will be analysed through the lens of their accompanying literature.
Presenter: Vincent Hannity, retired Boise Cascade Corporation executive and humanities enthusiast
Date and time: Fri., Jan. 10, 17, 24, and 31, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45

Politics and the Public University in the 21st Century

How has the nature of the public university changed compared to the experience many of us remember from our own college days? This lecture will discuss how millennials and Generation Z present new challenges in and out of the classroom, the loss of both financial and political support from state legislatures, the current attacks on the academy for its liberal bias, whether the university campus needs to address the issue of objectivity both in and out of the classroom, and the new rules of engagement in the college classroom. Finally, we will consider the role that intercollegiate athletics plays in the life of a university, with special emphasis on the increased demands to pay student-athletes for their services.
Presenter: Dr. Robert Kustra, retired President, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Jan. 14, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Inside the Boise Philharmonic

The Boise Philharmonic will perform four concerts in spring 2020 that will excite, entertain, and challenge all who attend. This lecture will allow members to enrich their Philharmonic experience through learning about the circumstances behind each composition, the lives of the composers, and how and why composers choose to feature specific instruments at times and the full, rich sonority of the entire orchestra at others.
Presenter: Dr. David Saunders, Professor Emeritus of Music, Boise State University
Date and time: Wed., Jan. 15 and 22, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $25

Zero Waste: Sustainability, Stuff, and the Quest for a Habitable Tomorrow

Zero Waste is a movement to promote a sustainable local and global future through the conscientious utilization of resources. Zero Waste draws upon science, consumer economics, psychology, and more to increase awareness of the impact of throw-away consumerism on people and the places where we live and love. This course will promote a better understanding of the far-reaching environmental and social consequences of human economic activity, explain how to make informed consumer choices, and offer achievable strategies to enjoy the benefits of a lower-impact lifestyle.
Presenters: Jillien Eijckelhof, founder and director, Zero Waste Boise Institute, and Dr. Patty Costello, board member, Zero Waste Boise Institute and City of Boise Curb It Pro volunteer
Date and time: Thu., Jan. 16 and 23, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Pleasure Woman: How Mae West Became an American Institution

Mae West, the hourglass shaped, blonde siren of 1930s Hollywood, symbolized sex in America for generations of moviegoers. Behind the honey-voiced “Come up an’ see me sometime” gal was a savvy businesswoman who broke down barriers for female voices and provided opportunities for minority performers through her creative activism. This lecture will trace the curves of her iconic career from Brooklyn to Hollywood, and how her legacy and innovation continues to inspire today.
Presenters: Darrin Pufall Purdy, Director of Theatre and Costume Design, Boise State University, and Minerva Jayne VanAllen, Boise entertainer, writer, and artist
Date and time: Fri., Jan. 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The History and Culture of Hobos

Making a living as traveling workers, the United States’ hobo population increased as the railroad system developed across the country. This lecture will provide an overview of the history and culture of hobos, including the initiation of hobo culture after the Civil War. The differences among hobos, tramps, and bums will be discussed as well as a day in the life of a hobo, hobo terminology, signage, and symbols, and the impact of economic conditions on hobo populations in the early 1900s. Please note: This is a repeat of Walt Adams’ fall 2019 lecture.
Presenter: Walt Adams, retired corporate security manager
Date and time: Mon., Jan. 27, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Osteoporosis: The Silent Thief: Lecture One

Osteoporosis (OP) represents a frequently overlooked and undiagnosed medical condition primarily affecting adults over age 50. Half of all women and a quarter of all men will fracture a bone in their lifetime. Over half of those are unable to resume their former level of independent function and the mortality rate from complications is surprisingly high. In spite of this awareness, the rate of osteoporotic fractures is increasing and the cost to our society is approximately $75 billion per year—exceeding that of heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer combined. The good news is that OP is easy to diagnose and is treatable. This lecture will review the osteoporosis-including data for our region, the basics of bone biology, risk factors for OP, diagnosis, treatment options, and myths related to OP and its treatment. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on February 7.
Presenter: James Loveless, MD, medical director, St. Luke’s Osteoporosis and Bone Health program
Date and time: Mon, Jan. 27, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Road to the 2020 Census: Lecture One

Article One of the United States Constitution mandates that each person living in the United States be counted every ten years. Census data affects the distribution of over $675 billion in federal funding and also determines how many members represent a state in the House of Representatives and the Electoral College. This lecture will explore the history of the United States census, how census data is used, how this data benefits Idaho and your community, why it is important to participate in the upcoming 2020 decennial census, and how to separate myth from fact. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on February 25.
Presenter: Jayne Black, partnership specialist, United States Census Bureau
Date and time: Tue., Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Mythic Memoir Writing Workshop

Both myth and memoir share a similar structure: the main protagonist goes into the woods and comes out wiser. In sharing memoir with readers, we share our lessons, the morals of our stories, and the keys to our lopsided, lovable, and deeply true versions of happily ever after. Yet memoir writers often get stuck choosing which stories—from all of the stories we’ve lived—to include. This single-day intensive workshop will combine lecture and short writing exercises to allow members to borrow structure from the great myths and fill in the story with the particulars of their single, human-sized life.
Presenter: Dr. Elisabeth McKetta, author
Date and time: Wed., Jan. 29, 8 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45
Capacity: 40

Idaho Museum of International Diaspora

The Idaho Museum of International Diaspora (IMID) is an innovative concept proposal for a museum that will showcase the lives of diaspora groups who have resettled in Idaho as immigrants and refugees. The museum’s pilot exhibit, ARRIVALS, will share accounts from refugees and immigrants from over 80 countries, including Native Americans, who now call Idaho home. Come learn about the museum’s mission, vision, and goals to preserve the history of people affected by diaspora and how this is critical to enriching understanding and inclusivity in Idaho.
Presenters: Palina Louangketh, Adjunct Faculty, Honors College, Boise State University, and Stephanie Bacon, Professor of Art, Boise State University
Date and time: Thu., Jan. 30, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Owyhee Initiative

The Owyhee Initiative was launched in 2001 by Owyhee County Commissioners to help resolve land management issues in southwest Idaho. This diverse group crafted a goal to protect the viability of the ranching economy, cultural resources, traditional access opportunities, and proposed wilderness and wild and scenic river designations for the wildest parts of Owyhee County’s spectacular canyonlands. Learn more about this successful collaboration and how it will protect a beautiful landscape for future generations.
Presenter: John Robison, Public Lands Director, Idaho Conservation League
Date and time: Fri., Jan. 31, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Starting in February

The Idaho Innocence Project: Freeing the Innocent

Dr. Greg Hampikian is the Executive Director of the Idaho Innocence Project and has worked on more than two dozen exonerations in the United States and overseas. His Boise State University laboratory is involved in cutting edge research in forensic science, cancer, HIV, and microbiology. This lecture will highlight some of the innocence cases that the Idaho Innocence Project and Dr. Hampikian’s laboratory have worked on. Learn how they investigate cases and how their clients are doing now that they are free.
Presenter: Dr. Greg Hampikian, Executive Director, Idaho Innocence Project
Date and time: Mon., Feb. 3, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Five Great American Economic Crises

Since 2009, the United States has experienced an exceptionally lengthy bout of continuous economic growth. And yet, with each passing day, economists grow increasingly anxious that these good times cannot last forever. Through an interdisciplinary inquiry into five of the most spectacular economic crises in American history—the Postwar Recession of 1780s, the Panic of 1873, the Great Depression of 1929, the 1973 Oil Crisis, and the Financial Collapse of 2008—this course will explore the ways in which America’s checkered history of economic catastrophe has defined our nation and how the history of economic crisis might help us better understand our present moment.
Presenter: Dr. Shaun Nichols, Professor of History, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Feb. 3, 10, 24, and Mar. 2, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

Frank Robinson: Idaho's Mail-Order Messiah

After losing his Los Angeles home, car, and business in a crash that presaged the Great Depression, Frank Robinson started over again by moving to Moscow, Idaho, in April 1928. What happened next reads like a novel. Within a year or so, Robinson became a religious leader and one of Idaho’s biggest names, landowners, and employers, and his New Thought denomination, Psychiana, one of the biggest mail-order businesses in the nation. Learn how this story came to life and how Frank Robinson’s happy life in Moscow was central to the Psychiana sales pitch, extolled on his 1930s radio broadcasts.
Presenter: Bill Manny, producer, Idaho Public Television
Date and time: Tue., Feb. 4, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Virgil's Aeneid

Taking inspiration from Homer, Virgil composed this epic poem which creates a rich, fascinating world of its own. Starting with the fall of Troy, the poem follows Aeneas and his band of refugees to their final settlement in Italy and depicts their fabulous adventures along the way. The poem portrays Aeneas as the heroic ancestor of the Roman people, but it also shows the ambiguities and human costs of that achievement. We will read the Aeneid in the bold translation by Sarah Ruden (Yale University Press, 2008).
Presenter: Dr. Richard Leahy, Professor Emeritus of English, Boise State University
Date and time: Wed., Feb. 5, 12, 19, and 26, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

Four Poets, Four Places

This course will examine four poets and four places: S. T. Coleridge in England, W. B. Yeats in Ireland, Robert Frost in New England, and W. S. Merwin in Hawaii. Join Dr. Harvey as she explores the places that not only deeply inform the literary oeuvre of these poets, but also have personal resonance with her in her intellectual and personal journey in the study of literature.
Presenter: Dr. Samantha Harvey, Professor of English, Boise State University
Date and time: Fri., Feb. 7, 14, 21, and 28, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $45

Osteoporosis: The Silent Thief: Lecture Two

Osteoporosis (OP) represents a frequently overlooked and undiagnosed medical condition primarily affecting adults over age 50. Half of all women and a quarter of all men will fracture a bone in their lifetime. Over half of those are unable to resume their former level of independent function and the mortality rate from complications is surprisingly high. In spite of this awareness, the rate of osteoporotic fractures is increasing and the cost to our society is approximately $75 billion per year—exceeding that of heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer combined. The good news is that OP is easy to diagnose and is treatable. This lecture will review the osteoporosis-including data for our region, the basics of bone biology, risk factors for OP, diagnosis, treatment options, and myths related to OP and its treatment. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on January 27.
Presenter: James Loveless, MD, medical director, St. Luke’s Osteoporosis and Bone Health program
Date and time: Fri., Feb. 7, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Ada County History Hodgepodge

This course will explore parts of Ada County’s history through three distinct topics: Boise architecture, Boise’s resurgence of convenience stores, and Ada County’s farm history. Join Idaho historian Barbara Perry Bauer as she takes members on armchair tours of how the Boise area has changed over the years.
Presenter: Barbara Perry Bauer, Principal, TAG Historical Research and Consulting
Date and time: Wed., Feb. 12, 19, and 26, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

Beethoven String Quartet Cycle: Performance Three

The year 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth; orchestras and ensembles around the world are already planning celebratory events in honor of the occasion. Join violinist Laurel Tally, violist Jennifer Drake, cellist Brian Hodges, and other string players as they perform two quartets—Op. 18, No. 3 and Op. 59, No. 3—in an intimate classroom setting. This unique experience spans from September 2019 to May 2021, and all 16 of Beethoven’s quartets will be played by the end of the cycle. Please note: Each performance requires separate registration. The fourth performance takes place on May 16.
Date and time: Sat., Feb. 15, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Location: Morrison Center Recital Hall, Boise State Department of Music, 2201 Cesar Chavez Ln., Boise
Cost:
$25

Introduction to Cybersecurity

This lecture will provide a high-level overview of cybersecurity and its role in business, government, and everyday personal computing. What should citizens know to protect their data and identity online? How do we balance connecting to the Internet with making sure our devices and data are secure? In addition to answering these questions, this lecture will present an introduction to the “Internet of Things,” mobile communication devices, a brief history of major cybersecurity developments, and a look into what the future may hold for this field. Please note: This is a repeat of Toby King’s fall 2019 lecture.
Presenter: Toby King, Senior Vice President of Information Technology, CapEd Credit Union
Date and time: Tue., Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Book Covers and Visual Literacy

Join three literary professionals for a deeper dive into the world of book covers and visual literacy. Session one will explore how book covers reflect market forces and societal norms, take a closer look at recent trends in Young Adult covers and specific design elements, and discuss how the popularity of eBooks has affected cover design in recent years. Session two will introduce the idea of visual literacy and discuss its importance while briefly covering the political history of comics in the United States, their stigma and recent resurgence, as well as the benefits of adding graphic novels to reading lists for both literacy and cognition.
Presenters: Gregory Taylor, Teacher Librarian, Hillside Junior High School; Kelly Jones, author; and Laura Johnston, Managing Editor, Rediscovered Publishing
Date and time: Tue., Feb. 18 and 25, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Foreign Language Acquisition in the Treasure Valley

Join Dr. Kelly Arispe as she presents research findings from her 2018 Osher Faculty Grant. This lecture will provide findings from Dr. Arispe’s research from 25 K-12 world language classrooms across the Treasure Valley. Learn more about the science behind teaching and learning a second language, how best to learn a second language, how to create the best learning environment, and what cutting-edge technologies are available and how they impact teachers’ ability to reflect on their own practice.
Presenter: Dr. Kelly Arispe, 2018 Osher Faculty Grant Recipient and Associate Professor of World Languages, Boise State University
Date and time: Thu., Feb. 20, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

LOTTERY: Idaho State Capitol Building Tour: Event One

Soak up Idaho history while exploring the Idaho State Capitol building, all the way from the garden level to the fourth floor. This tour will include information about the building’s architectural design influences, its use of natural light and geothermal energy, what the “Capitol of Light” really means, and more. Please note: This tour will require standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The second offering takes place on February 28.
Date and time: Fri., Feb. 21, 1-2:30 p.m.
Location: 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 35

The Legacy of WWII Japanese American Incarceration: Lecture One

Hysteria overwhelmed law when, in the wake of Pearl Harbor, the United States Army imprisoned over 120,000 Japanese Americans. Idaho’s Camp Minidoka held about 9,000 people, most of whom were American citizens. This course will explore the impacts of these camps and include topics such as racial profiling, the United States Constitution, wartime reparations, and ongoing legal battles over the president’s executive power. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on February 28.
Presenter: Dr. Todd Shallat, Professor Emeritus of History and Urban Studies, Boise State University
Date and time: Fri., Feb. 21, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Human Trafficking In Idaho

Federal law defines human trafficking as “modern slavery.” Traffickers use force, threats, fraud, and coercion to lure victims of all ages into labor and/or commercial sexual exploitation. This lecture will introduce members to this crime by examining real cases that were adjudicated in Idaho. Discussion will include signs of human trafficking, victim/perpetrator dynamics, and obstacles to successful investigations. Please note: This is an updated presentation of Detective Miraglia’s fall 2018 lecture.
Presenter: Detective Mike Miraglia, member of the Boise Police Violent Crimes Unit
Date and time: Mon., Feb. 24, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Road to the 2020 Census: Lecture Two

Article One of the United States Constitution mandates that each person living in the United States be counted every ten years. Census data affects the distribution of over $675 billion in federal funding and also determines how many members represent a state in the House of Representatives and the Electoral College. This lecture will explore the history of the United States census, how census data is used, how this data benefits Idaho and your community, why it is important to participate in the upcoming 2020 decennial census, and how to separate myth from fact. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on January 28.
Presenter: Jayne Black, partnership specialist, United States Census Bureau
Date and time: Tue., Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Behind the Scenes: The Drag by Mae West

Join the Boise State Department of Theatre, Film, and Creative Writing for a unique behind-the-scenes look at their spring production, The Drag: A Homosexual Comedy, by Hollywood legend Mae West. Learn about the play’s story and design elements from the director, production design team, and cast. Stay afterwards for a rare look at a rehearsal in process. Tickets will be available for purchase after the event.
Presenter: Darrin Pufall Purdy, Director of Theatre and Costume Design, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Feb. 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Location: Danny Peterson Theatre, 2201 W. Cesar Chavez Ln., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 160

Assessing Idaho’s Ground Water Quality

Multiple agencies in Idaho have monitoring programs to collect and assess ground water quality: Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA), Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ), and the United State Geological Survey (USGS). This lecture will present data and interpretations from these programs, focusing primarily on nitrate and pesticide detections. A panel of experts will explain the steps taken to collect data, show how the public can access the data, and describe DEQ’s process to identify areas of ground water degradation.
Presenters: Curtis Cooper, Water Program Lead, ISDA; Amy Steimke, Hydrogeologist, IDWR; Kathryn D. Elliott, Ground Water Coordinator, DEQ; and Ken Skinner, Hydrologist, USGS
Date and time: Thu., Feb. 27, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

LOTTERY: Idaho State Capitol Building Tour: Event Two

Soak up some Idaho history while exploring the Idaho State Capitol building, all the way from the garden level to the fourth floor. This tour will include information about the building’s architectural design influences, its use of natural light and geothermal energy, and its original construction and later renovation projects. Along the way, learn why President Lincoln is associated with Idaho, what the “Capitol of Light” really means, where citizens gather to give input on legislation, and more. Please note: This tour will require standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The first event takes place on February 21.
Date and time: Fri., Feb. 28, 1-2:30 p.m.
Location: 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 35

The Legacy of WWII Japanese American Incarceration: Lecture Two

Hysteria overwhelmed law when, in the wake of Pearl Harbor, the United States Army imprisoned over 120,000 Japanese Americans. Idaho’s Camp Minidoka held about 9,000 people, most of whom were American citizens. This course will explore the impacts of these camps and include topics such as racial profiling, the United States Constitution, wartime reparations, and ongoing legal battles over the president’s executive power. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on February 21.
Presenter: Dr. Todd Shallat, Professor Emeritus of History and Urban Studies, Boise State University
Date and time: Fri., Feb. 28, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Starting in March

Volcano Storytelling: Tales from Four Active Volcanoes

Documentary filmmaker Zach Voss and Boise State geophysics professor Jeffrey Johnson have teamed up to share the exciting world of volcano science with the public. With support from National Geographic, the pair traveled to Italy, Japan, Guatemala, and Ecuador to film research teams monitoring eruptions and conducting volcano research with cutting-edge technologies. Join Zach and Jeff as they introduce volcano science with engaging visuals and stories. Please note: This is a repeat of Zach Voss and Dr. Johnson’s fall 2019 lecture.
Presenters: Zach Voss, film director and cinematographer; and Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, Associate Professor of Geosciences, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 2, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Let's Hear It For the Silents!

Comedy, romance, adventure, spectacle! Before sound, silent films invented a visual language that transcended borders, languages, and cultures. Chaplin, Valentino, Fairbanks, and Pickford were worldwide celebrities while Griffith, DeMille, Keaton, and Lubitsch pioneered techniques that are still used today. This course will provide an overview of the best of the world’s first filmmakers and explore what the silents have to say for themselves.
Presenter: Lance Thompson, president, Idaho Media Professionals
Date and time: Tue., Mar. 3, 10, and 17, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

Seinfeld and the Philosophy of Nothingness

The ‘90s sitcom Seinfeld addresses many of the popular concerns of our times: the meaning of life, human rationality, feminism, nihilism, and other perplexing problems. This course will examine philosophers including Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and Nietzsche, and it will look into odd paradoxes here and there to examine many of the Seinfeld episodes.
Presenter: Dr. Christopher Innes, Adjunct Professor of Philosophy, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Mar. 3 and 10, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

You Have the Right to Be Confused! Understanding Miranda and the Fifth Amendment

Fifty years after its creation, the rule promulgated in Miranda v. Arizona is second nature in the criminal justice system and pop culture. However, the United States Supreme Court case law that surrounds Miranda causes much confusion among law enforcement officials, legal practitioners, and the public as to its application in the admissibility of confessions. This lecture will explore Miranda, the cases that followed, and its connection to the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.
Presenter: Dr. Bryan Taylor, Prosecuting Attorney for Canyon County, Idaho
Date and time: Wed., Mar. 4, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Gene Harris Jazz Festival

The 19th annual Gene Harris Jazz Festival will take place in April 2020. This lecture will discuss the history of the festival, provide background on Gene Harris, and explain Gene’s support of the festival and its connection to Boise State University. Learn about past festivals and artists, plans for the current year’s festival, and what the future may hold.
Presenter: Dr. Derek Ganong, festival director, Gene Harris Jazz Festival
Date and time: Thu., Mar. 5, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Collaborative Forces: Dance

Explore the collaborations of four seminal choreographers with leading composers and visual artists: modern dance choreographer Martha Graham with composer Aaron Copland and sculptor Isamu Noguchi; ballet choreographer George Balanchine with composer Igor Stravinsky; modern dance choreographer Merce Cunningham with composer John Cage and visual artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns; and choreographer Jerome Robbins with composer Leonard Bernstein. This course will focus on the interconnections of dance and other art forms while providing the history and background of each artist.
Presenter: Kay Braden, choreographer and teacher
Date and time: Fri., Mar. 6 and 13, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Medieval Pilgrimage: Lecture Two

Discover the experience of the medieval pilgrim with author Ellis Knox. Beginning in southern France, we will travel across Italy to Venice, then go by ship to the Holy Land, making stops along the way. Once there, we will visit sacred sites in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Bethlehem, and surrounding areas. Our pilgrims then cross the Sinai Peninsula, visiting Cairo and Alexandria before returning to France. This lecture will include numerous images, both historical and modern, to illustrate every phase of the journey. Along the way, we will learn more about the medieval time period, including the conditions of travel, dangers faced by the pilgrims, and what pilgrimage meant to these travelers in the early fifteenth century. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The original offering takes place the afternoon of March 11.
Presenter: Dr. Ellis Knox, author and published medieval and early modern historian
Date and time: Wed., Mar. 11, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Medieval Pilgrimage: Lecture One

Discover the experience of the medieval pilgrim with author Ellis Knox. Beginning in southern France, we will travel across Italy to Venice, then go by ship to the Holy Land, making stops along the way. Once there, we will visit sacred sites in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Bethlehem, and surrounding areas. Our pilgrims then cross the Sinai Peninsula, visiting Cairo and Alexandria before returning to France. This lecture will include numerous images, both historical and modern, to illustrate every phase of the journey. Along the way, we will learn more about the medieval time period, including the conditions of travel, dangers faced by the pilgrims, and what pilgrimage meant to these travelers in the early fifteenth century. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place the morning of March 11.
Presenter: Dr. Ellis Knox, author and published medieval and early modern historian
Date and time: Wed., Mar. 11, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Reaching for the Stars

Join Ellen Ochoa in a fireside chat as she describes her career as NASA’s first Hispanic female astronaut, a veteran of four space shuttle missions, and director of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. This session will give special focus to the process of building and operating the International Space Station and will feature a video chronicling one of Dr. Ochoa’s missions to the Station. Please note: This session will feature extensive Q & A with the presenter.
Presenter: Dr. Ellen Ochoa, former astronaut and director, Johnson Space Center
Date and time: Thu., Mar. 12, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Cyber Crime in Idaho

Join FBI Special Agent Clark Harshbarger to gain a law enforcement perspective on the risks and effects of cyber crime through anecdotes and case summaries from Idaho.
Presenter: Clark Harshbarger, Special Agent, Federal Bureau of Investigation
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 16, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Vietnam...Can't Get You Out of My Mind: Lecture One

When President John Kennedy challenged young people to ask what they could do for their country, Jim Jones, former Idaho Supreme Court Chief Justice, decided on a career of public service. His book, Vietnam… Can’t Get You Out of My Mind, chronicles his tour of duty in Vietnam where he lived and worked with South Vietnamese forces, helped an orphanage, served as an aerial artillery spotter, and grew to know the Vietnamese people. This lecture will be based on his book and will provide members a glimpse into this powerful influence on Jim’s life of public service. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on March 25.
Presenter: Jim Jones, JD, retired Honorable Chief Justice, Idaho Supreme Court
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 16, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Supporting Children’s Literacy Development as a Grandparent

Literacy development is foundational to learning about and interacting with the world. Although the bulk of literacy education occurs in school settings, family support and activities are critical to the development of literacy knowledge, abilities, and dispositions. This seminar will explore children’s literacy development and ways to support this development as a grandparent or other family member. After a brief overview of developmental processes for reading and writing, we will examine various types of books and how to choose them for individuals, reading aloud to children, and encouraging reading and writing.
Presenter: Susan Martin, Professor Emerita of Education, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Mar. 17, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25
Capacity: 40

The Aftermath of a Crime

Join three professionals from the criminal justice system for unique perspectives on what happens after a crime has been committed. Session one will provide an introduction to the inner workings of a state crime laboratory, presenting cases from forensic disciplines to show how science helps investigate and solve crimes, prosecute suspects, and exonerate the innocent. Session two will present Faces of Hope Victim Center, a partnership within Ada County to support victims and address their immediate medical and forensic needs. Finally, session three will examine treatment courts, their impact on lowering recidivism rates, and how the judge is key in determining an offender’s future.
Presenters: Matthew Gamette, Director of Forensic Services, Idaho State Police; Jean Fisher, Chief Operating Officer, Faces of Hope Victim Center; and Cheri Copsey, JD, retired 4th District Court judge
Date and time: Wed., Mar. 18, 25, and Apr. 8, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

The Story Behind the Story: The Making a Literary Nonfiction Book

Join New York Times’ best-selling author Kim Cross as she details the research and fact-checking that goes into a literary nonfiction book. Her book, What Stands in a Storm, chronicles the biggest tornado outbreak in recorded weather—an April 2011 storm that unleashed 349 tornados on 21 states, killing at least 324 people. Cross spent a year interviewing meteorologists, first responders, and trauma survivors to create a moving narrative that unfolds with minute-by-minute accuracy. This lecture will include user-generated videos captured by eyewitnesses, social media posts and texts of people in the midst of the storm, and maps of the landscape before and after mile-wide tornadoes.
Presenter: Kim Cross, New York Times best-selling author and journalist
Date and time: Wed., Mar. 18, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Natural Language Understanding in Computational Systems

Artificial intelligence requires the ability to acquire, represent, understand, and produce natural language. Although recent work in data-driven, machine learning, and deep learning methods has advanced natural language processing applications, important challenges remain. This lecture will look at trends in understanding language on machines, what we can learn from children who acquire language seemingly with minimal effort, and what that means for future research. Dr. Kennington will explain his own research at which brings together computer science, machine/deep learning, human-robot interaction, natural language processing, spoken dialogue systems, child development, and cognitive science.
Presenter: Dr. Casey Kennington, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Boise State University
Date and time: Thu., Mar. 19, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Taking the Mystery out of Medicare: Lecture One

Are you confused by the confusing alphabet soup that is Medicare? Join Dr. Jamie Whitlock as he explains the ins and outs of Medicare, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage Plans, drug plans, enrollment periods, and more. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, we are offering this lecture twice. The second offering takes place on May 14.
Presenter: Jamie Whitlock, MD, retired chiropractor and Medicare educator
Date and time: Thu., Mar. 19, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Eagle Hunters of Mongolia and the History of Human-Raptor Relationships: Lecture One

Take flight on a journey across continents and cultures to discover the birth of falconry, its evolution over the millennia, and how this ancient art helps conservation today. This lecture will pay special attention to Mongolia’s nomadic Kazakh people and their practice of hunting with eagles as well as South Africa’s bushveld, where crowned eagles—primate hunters whose ancestors hunted our own Australopithecine ancestors—give unique insight into our evolution and how we think about eagles today. This lecture will also present techniques for hunting with golden and crowned eagles here in the United States, both for rehabilitation and as a way to keep these ancient traditions alive. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on Mar. 20.
Presenter: Dr. Lauren McGough, licensed falconer and Fulbright Scholar
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 23, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Ballet Idaho: An Introduction

Ballet Idaho is one of Boise’s landmark arts organizations. With five productions per season ranging from classics like The Nutcracker to risk-taking new works by contemporary choreographers, a team of dedicated dancers and apprentices, and a robust dance education program, Ballet Idaho has become a staple of Idaho arts and culture. Join artistic director Garrett Anderson and artistic associate Anne Mueller as they discuss the history and current activities of Ballet Idaho’s professional company and training academy.
Presenters: Garrett Anderson, artistic director, Ballet Idaho; and Anne Mueller, artistic associate, Ballet Idaho
Date and time: Fri., Mar. 20, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Eagle Hunters of Mongolia and the History of Human-Raptor Relationships: Lecture Two

Take flight on a journey across continents and cultures to discover the birth of falconry, its evolution over the millennia, and how this ancient art helps conservation today. This lecture will pay special attention to Mongolia’s nomadic Kazakh people and their practice of hunting with eagles as well as South Africa’s bushveld, where crowned eagles—primate hunters whose ancestors hunted our own Australopithecine ancestors—give unique insight into our evolution and how we think about eagles today. This lecture will also present techniques for hunting with golden and crowned eagles here in the United States, both for rehabilitation and as a way to keep these ancient traditions alive. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on Mar. 20.
Presenter: Dr. Lauren McGough, licensed falconer and Fulbright Scholar
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 23, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Vietnam...Can't Get You Out of My Mind: Lecture Two

When President John Kennedy challenged young people to ask what they could do for their country, Jim Jones, former Idaho Supreme Court Chief Justice, decided on a career of public service. His book, Vietnam… Can’t Get You Out of My Mind, chronicles his tour of duty in Vietnam where he lived and worked with South Vietnamese forces, helped an orphanage, served as an aerial artillery spotter, and grew to know the Vietnamese people. This lecture will be based on his book and will provide members a glimpse into this powerful influence on Jim’s life of public service. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on March 16.
Presenter: Jim Jones, JD, retired Honorable Chief Justice, Idaho Supreme Court
Date and time: Wed., Mar. 25, 1:30-3:30 p.m
Cost: Included with membership

Bat Biology, Ecology, and Conservation

This course will introduce members to the biology of bats and the features that make them unique among vertebrates. Topics include life history and social biology, functional ecology, and conservation biology with an emphasis on the bats of Idaho. Learn about echolocation, migration, bat reproduction, rabies, and more before examining the leading threats to bats and the actions we can take in our communities to help them.
Presenter: Dr. Rita Dixon, State Wildlife Action Plan Coordinator, Idaho Department of Fish and Game
Date and time: Fri., Mar. 27, Apr. 3, and 10, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Sage-Grouse in Idaho

Sage-grouse are found in sagebrush-dominated habitats in much of southeast Idaho. This lecture will cover the basic biology of sage-grouse including breeding behavior, reproduction, survival, movements, and habitat use. Science-based population and habitat management techniques will be addressed followed by information on bad science, misinformed management, and political chicanery being implemented by state and federal agencies.
Presenter: Dr. Jack Connelly, retired biologist, Idaho Department of Fish and Game
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 30, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Democratic and Economic Decline in Latin America

Across Latin America, there is widespread concern that countries are backsliding away from previous commitments to secure democratic rights and economic opportunities for their poor citizens. This lecture will examine how Latin America has transformed since the 1980s—from the widespread adoption of democracy and the implementation of neo-liberal economics to the growth of paramilitaries and drug traffickers and the weakening of political parties. Particular attention will be paid to Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, and Colombia.
Presenter: Dr. Brian Wampler, Professor of Political Science, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Mar. 30, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Menopause and Hormone Replacement Therapy

This lecture will aim to clear up confusion and fear surrounding menopause and hormones by presenting data from recent scientific studies and explaining the various options from which women can choose.
Presenter: Marianne Zakarian, MD, retired board certified obstetrics and gynecology practitioner
Date and time: Tue., Mar. 31, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

The Early American West: Pre-Contact Era to the Late 1800s

This course will explore the early origins, traditions, and interactions of the people living in the North American West. We will compare the colonial experience of different people groups including the First Nations/Indians, Spanish, Russian, English, and Americans, examine how western places became part of the United States and Canada, and explain how “The West” evolved as both a real and imagined place.
Presenter: Dr. Bob H. Reinhardt, author and Assistant Professor of History, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Mar. 31, Apr. 7, 14, and 21, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

Starting in April

Introduction to Astronomy

There’s more than just stars and planets! There are galaxies, quasars, black holes, neutron stars, supernovae and much, much more. Join us as we explore the interesting things that are “out there.” Astronomy is also one of the few sciences where amateurs make significant contributions. We’ll overview the equipment available to the layperson, if you wish to participate for your own interest, or contribute to the body of scientific knowledge.
Presenter: Paul Nelson, retired Senior Engineer, DRAM Research and Development, Micron Technology
Date and time: Thu., Apr. 2 and 9, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $25

Transformation of the Automobile Business

The automobile business is facing two significant technology changes. First is the transformation from the internal combustion engine to the electric battery, a change that is already underway and in the early years of sales. The second transformation is the development of autonomous vehicles, now still in the experimental phase with commercial implementation still some time away. Effects from both of these changes are being felt with many more yet to come. This course will walk through these changes and discuss the general pattern of how technology tends to be developed and adopted over time.
Presenter: Chuck Folkner, retired Principal Systems Architect, Starbucks Coffee Company
Date and time: Fri., April 3 and 10, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $25

Caxton Printers of Idaho

If you own any books about Idaho, it’s likely that one of them was published by Caxton Printers in Caldwell, Idaho. In 1907, James H. Gipson founded Caxton as a small print shop. Over the following decades, Caxton has published hundreds of books in numerous genres––Americana, fiction, children’s stories, and history, among others––primarily about Idaho and the American West. Gipson’s philosophy was to help writers from the West get published, regardless of the commercial success of their books, though he also published well-known authors such as Vardis Fisher and Ayn Rand.This lecture will discuss the history of Caxton and their importance to Idaho: what impact have Caxton’s books had on Idaho? How has Caxton helped Idaho authors? And how was a tiny publisher in Idaho able to survive and compete with large, East Coast publishers?
Presenter: Alessandro Meregaglia, 2019 Osher Faculty Grant Recipient and librarian and archivist, Albertsons Library, Boise State University
Date and time: Mon., Apr. 6, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Live and Age Well

As we transition through life, it is essential to balance our mental, physical, and emotional well-being in a way that supports good health, longevity, and happiness. Join facilitator Patricia Flanigan and a panel of healthcare professionals as they discuss the natural aging process and how to live and age well. Topics will include memory loss, nutrition, exercise, technology, and living purposefully. Learn innovative strategies and gain tangible insights on how to live a better and more meaningful life.
Presenter: Patricia Flanigan, Ed.D., Affiliate Faculty, Center for the Study of Aging, Boise State University
Date and time: Tue., Apr. 7 and 14, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $25

Learn to Weave with the Boise Art Museum

Learn to weave! Explore materials, techniques, and textures while gathering inspiration from the Boise Art Museum (BAM)’s collection. This workshop will focus on experimentation as members will learn to construct their own loom and create multiple fiber objects to take home with them. Basic techniques, composition construction, and texture exploration will be introduced. No prior experience is necessary and all levels are welcome. Materials for in-class weaving will be provided and are included in the cost of this workshop. Additional supplies may be purchased if members wish to practice outside of class. Please note: This is a repeat of BAM’s fall 2019 workshop.
Date and time: Tue., Apr. 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2:30-4:30 p.m.
Location: Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Dr., Boise
Cost: $55
Capacity: 25

Historical Voices of Idaho’s First People

This lecture will introduce members to two events that positively impacted communities, particularly those of the First People. By referencing the presenter’s two films, The Historical Impact of the “S” Word and Idaho’s Forgotten War, members will get a powerful glimpse into the faces and voices of those who lived through these historical events: the removal of the word “squaw” from Idaho landmarks and how a Native Idaho woman declared war on the United States Government in 1974.
Presenter: Sonya Rosario, documentary filmmaker and storyteller
Date and time: Wed., Apr. 8, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Let's Write an Opera

From commissioning and composing to premiering and revising, it takes a long process for an original work to become a standard repertoire opera. This course will look at operas by Handel, Mozart, Verdi, Puccini, and contemporary composers to explain this process. Special focus will be given to Jake Heggie’s Dead Man Walking, which will be performed by Opera Idaho in April 2020. Each session will feature recorded excerpts as well as selections performed live by members of Opera Idaho’s Resident Company and the cast of Dead Man Walking.
Presenter: Mark Junkert, Executive Director, Opera Idaho
Date and time: Thu., Apr 9, 16, and 23, 10 a.m.-noon
Location: Opera Idaho, 513 S. 8th St., Boise
Cost: $35
Capacity: 100

Adventures in Filmmaking: Return to Mt. Kennedy

In 1965, Jim Whittaker led Robert Kennedy to the first ascent of a remote mountain in the Yukon named after JFK. Fifty years later, their sons revisited the site of the iconic climb. Joined by filmmaker Eric Becker, every facet of their adventure was documented. His award-winning feature length documentary, Return to Mount Kennedy, features original music by Eddie Vedder, never-before-seen footage of the climb, the film and sits at the intersection of politics, human rights, environmentalism, and adventure. This lecture will take members through the exciting and often hilarious process of creating such a film, offering visuals that didn’t make the cut and an insider’s view of the filmmaking process.
Presenter: Eric Becker, film director
Date and time: Thu., Apr. 9, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Footes of Boise Canyon

This course will offer an immersion into the lives of Mary Hallock Foote, a nineteenth-century author and illustrator, and her husband, Arthur Foote, the engineer whose irrigation designs were later implemented as Arrowrock Dam and the New York Canal. Three scholars will share the most recent perspectives on the Footes including the history of their stone house beside the Boise River, and a discussion of Mary’s literary career, and her works. An optional, off-site visit to the Foote home near Lucky Peak dam will provide an extensive, expert-led Q & A session about the Footes and the recent renovation of Foote Park. More information on this field trip will be presented during the course.
Presenters: Dr. Tara Penry, Professor of English, Boise State University; Dr. Stacey Guill, published independent scholar; and Judy Austin Bott, retired Coordinator of Publications, Idaho State Historical Society
Date and time: Mon., Apr. 13 and 20, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $25

Presidents Touched by Greatness

Although they were controversial presidents, Jefferson, Wilson, and LBJ nonetheless had major accomplishments. Many themes they faced are still current in our politics—race, war and peace, and progressive politics versus the inevitable backlash. In the context of 2020 politics, we will revisit these larger than life characters, all of whom are also flawed, controversial people—and presidents. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this course is offered twice, as noted below.
Presenter: Marc Johnson, historian, writer, and host of the podcast, “Many Things Considered”
Date and time:
Course One: Wed., Thu., and Fri., Apr. 15, 16, and 17, 10 a.m.-noon
Course Two: Wed., Thu., and Fri., Apr. 15, 16, and 17, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Will Rogers: The World’s First Multimedia Star: Course Two

Join Will Rogers historian and writer Kurt Orzeck as he retraces the life of one the most iconic Americans of the twentieth century. Learn about the epic adventures of this humorous and lovable vaudeville performer who became Hollywood’s highest-paid film actor as well as America’s most widely syndicated newspaper columnist and radio broadcaster. This lecture will also discuss Rogers’ wide range of friendships, from his pet calf Sara to Charles Lindberg to Wylie Post, a one-eyed pilot with whom he died in a tragic plane crash. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, we are offering this course twice. The first offering begins on January 8.
Presenter: Kurt Orzeck, freelance writer, editor, and blogger
Date and time: Wed., Apr. 22, 29, May 6, and 13, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

Naturopathic Medicine for Heart and Kidney Health

Chronic disease is an important topic in today’s medical field. How can natural medicine and simple lifestyle choices influence health? This lecture will explain what naturopathic medicine is, who naturopathic medical doctors are in Idaho, and how implementing simple daily activities can improve heart and kidney health.
Presenter: Jackie Schrempp, ND, licensed naturopathic medical doctor and acupuncturist
Date and time: Thu., Apr. 23, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

The Life and Influence of Chairman Mao: Lecture One

Mao Zedong led China for many tumultuous years in the twentieth century. Assessment of Mao and his rule has varied widely: some see Mao simply as a monster, others as an almost divine peasant hero, and then there is the Communist Party of China’s official appraisal that he was 70% right and 30% wrong. This lecture will provide an overview of Mao’s life and thought, enabling us to better understand the historical position from which he and his ideas emerged and the impacts they had in his day. We will also consider Mao’s continuing influence on China and the world. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, we are offering this lecture twice. The second offering will take place the afternoon of Apr. 24.
Presenter: Dr. Jeff Kyong-McClain, Co-Director of the Confucius Institute, University of Idaho
Date and time: Fri., Apr. 24, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

The Life and Influence of Chairman Mao: Lecture Two

Mao Zedong led China for many tumultuous years in the twentieth century. Assessment of Mao and his rule has varied widely: some see Mao simply as a monster, others as an almost divine peasant hero, and then there is the Communist Party of China’s official appraisal that he was 70% right and 30% wrong. This lecture will provide an overview of Mao’s life and thought, enabling us to better understand the historical position from which he and his ideas emerged and the impacts they had in his day. We will also consider Mao’s continuing influence on China and the world. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, we are offering this lecture twice. The first offering will take place the morning of Apr. 24.
Presenter: Dr. Jeff Kyong-McClain, Co-Director of the Confucius Institute, University of Idaho
Date and time: Fri., Apr. 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Three Unique Biographies in Idaho History

Learn about the tenacity, triumph and tragedy of three historical Idahoans: Farris Lind, the advertising virtuoso who ran the Idaho Stinker Stations and entertained drivers with his 150 humorous signs; Emma Thompson Just, an Idaho pioneer who, fearing an imminent attack from the Nez Perce during their 1877 flight, came within seconds of drowning herself and her children; and James Hogan, also known as “Jimmy the Stiff,” who was in the newspapers in the 1890s and the early part of the twentieth century more often than most politicians.
Presenter: Rick Just, author and director, Writers at Harriman
Date and time: Tue., Apr. 28, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Genetic/Genomic Health and Testing Technologies

In recent decades, genetic discoveries and technological advances have exploded to a degree and pace unmatched by any other discipline in history. This course will introduce and expand upon the rapidly-progressing field of Medical Genetics and Genomics and introduce topics including the genetic impact on health and disease, genetic testing capabilities, relevance to policy and legislation, and more.
Presenter: Heidi Nagel, Genetic Test Utilization Coordinator and Consultant, St. Luke’s Health System
Date and time: Tue., Apr. 28, May 5, and 12, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

The Journey of the Bitterroot Grizzly: Lecture One

Bitterroot grizzly bear recovery efforts began in 1987 and involved an innovative approach to endangered species recovery. Drawing from his new book, Journey of the Bitterroot Grizzly, presenter Steve Nadeau will provide members with an inside look at this recovery effort and describe the story of a remarkable grizzly that was born in the Selkirk mountains in 2002 and travelled 200 miles to the Bitterroots by 2007—the first to do so in 60 years. Steve will also discuss the recent movements of grizzly bears in and around the Bitterroot recovery area and how these grizzly bears have survived the gauntlet to try to establish a new population in Idaho. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on May 7.
Presenter: Steve Nadeau, retired Wildlife Staff Biologist, Wildlife Bureau, Idaho Fish and Game
Date and time: Thu., Apr. 30, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Starting in May

Celebrating 100 years of Commercial Radio

The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of commercial radio in America. This lecture will take us back to the years just before the onset of this cultural phenomenon. Decade by decade we’ll trace the development of AM radio, hear excerpts of popular programs, see the stars created by this new media, and examine how it has forever changed our lives and our society.
Presenter: Dennis Hall, Community Advisory Board member, Boise State Public Radio
Date and time: Fri., May 1, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Skin Biology and Skin Cancer Fundamentals: Lecture One

The skin is the body’s largest organ and is often considered the window to our internal health. This lecture will discuss the basic structure and function of the skin, how skin disease occurs, and evidence-based care for skin. We will then dive into an introduction of skin cancer and its management, treatment, and prevention. Please note: This lecture will contain numerous images and video of skin disease and surgery that may be disturbing to some individuals. Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The second offering takes place on May 8.
Presenter: Dr. Jared Scott, MD, board certified dermatologist, Idaho Skin Surgery Center
Date and time: Fri., May 1, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Native Plant Landscaping

Learn about regionally-appropriate native plants that will improve improve water conservation and enhance the lives of Idaho’s pollinators and birds. While emphasis will be placed on native plant species, this course will also discuss non-native xeric plants that have adapted to the region. An optional, independent field trip will be available for members to visit several area gardens where such plants are featured. More information on this field trip will be presented during the course.
Presenter: Ann DeBolt, retired native plant and restoration botanist, Idaho Botanical Garden
Date and time: Mon., May 4 and 11, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $25

Inside the Play

Carole Whiteleather joins us again this spring to lead the exploration of two of Shakespeare’s plays included in the Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s 2020 summer lineup: Much Ado About Nothing and Henry V. Join Carole as she examines questions such as, “What lies hidden in the play?” “What is the history and backstory of Shakespeare’s work?” “What are the clues the actors look for as they create characters and how do directors and designers determine the viewpoint of the production?” With special participation by Festival Producing Director, Charles Fee, this course will offer a unique perspective on comedy, tragedy and reality within the Bard’s plays.
Presenter: Carole Whiteleather, director and actor
Date and time: Mon., May 4, 11, and 18, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

Eastern Orthodox Theology and Iconology

Discover the meaning and theology of Eastern Orthodox icons from their beginnings in the early church to the present. Learn how and why Orthodox iconography differs from Western and how icons enhance Orthodox worship and teachings. An optional, independent field trip will be available for members to visit St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church in Boise to discover the ways icons are presented. More information on this field trip will be presented during the lecture.
Presenter: Father Matthew Garrett, master iconographer and assistant priest, St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church
Date and time: Tue., May 5, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Current and Future Effects of Recent Tax Reforms

On December 22, 2017 President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act into law. Among other changes, this legislation cut individual tax rates, doubled the standard deduction, eliminated personal exemptions, and cut the corporate tax rate. The impetus for the change was to stimulate the economy in the short run and to increase long-run economic growth. As President Trump stated, “And just as I promised the American people from this podium 11 months ago, we enacted the biggest tax cuts and reforms in American history. Our massive tax cuts provide tremendous relief for the middle class and small business.” Preliminary analysis of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is now being reported. Did the legislation provide the results expected by President Trump? That is the issue addressed in this lecture.
Presenter: Dr. Christine Loucks, Department Chair, Economics, Boise State University
Date and time: Wed., May 6, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Myth and Folklore: An Ecological Perspective

Myth and folklore are deeply embedded in our individual and community experiences and can teach us much about how and why we do the things we do within the natural world. This course will guide members through an ecological exploration of myths, folktales, and folk practices, paying special attention to how our relationships with the non-human world are encoded in stories and how these stories can shape our ecological behaviors and perceptions. Myth and folklore will be examined to discover which ecological messages are conveyed and whether or not these messages demonstrate best practices for sustainability.
Presenter: Tracey Kindall, Director, McCall Arts and Humanities Council
Date and time: Wed., May 6, 13, 20, and 27, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45
Capacity: 40

Teaching Writing in Prison: Empowerment and Transformation

Diane Raptosh has been teaching writing to populations behind bars for over ten years. By sharing her experiences and providing samples of inmate writers’ work, this lecture will show that these authors are neither the caricatured monsters touted by reality TV and popular film, nor the faceless statistics generated by social science. In the face of American claims to practice exceptional respect for human freedom, the fact that the United States imprisons a greater number of its own citizens than any other nation on earth is widely received with shock or anguish. Such facts and statistics will serve as a backdrop for this lecture, with the primary focus being on the transformative power of writing for incarcerated citizens.
Presenter: Diane Raptosh, author and Co-Director, Criminal Justice/Prison Studies, The College of Idaho
Date and time: Thu., May 7, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

The Journey of the Bitterroot Grizzly: Lecture Two

Bitterroot grizzly bear recovery efforts began in 1987 and involved an innovative approach to endangered species recovery. Drawing from his new book, Journey of the Bitterroot Grizzly, presenter Steve Nadeau will provide members with an inside look at this recovery effort and describe the story of a remarkable grizzly that was born in the Selkirk mountains in 2002 and travelled 200 miles to the Bitterroots by 2007—the first to do so in 60 years. Steve will also discuss the recent movements of grizzly bears in and around the Bitterroot recovery area and how these grizzly bears have survived the gauntlet to try to establish a new population in Idaho. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on April 30.
Presenter: Steve Nadeau, retired Wildlife Staff Biologist, Wildlife Bureau, Idaho Fish and Game
Date and time: Thu., May 7, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Skin Biology and Skin Cancer Fundamentals: Lecture Two

The skin is the body’s largest organ and is often considered the window to our internal health. This lecture will discuss the basic structure and function of the skin, how skin disease occurs, and evidence-based care for skin. We will then dive into an introduction of skin cancer and its management, treatment, and prevention. Please note: This lecture will contain numerous images and video of skin disease and surgery that may be disturbing to some individuals. Due to anticipated interest, this lecture is offered twice. The first offering takes place on May 1.
Presenter: Dr. Jared Scott, MD, board certified dermatologist, Idaho Skin Surgery Center
Date and time: Fri., May 8, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

LOTTERY: Explore the Yanke Motor Museum: Event One

Enjoy a morning at the Yanke Motor Museum to learn and experience a bit of the history of the Yanke family in the Treasure Valley. Members will be able to explore the Yanke family’s extensive collection featuring over 150 cars, trucks, motorcycles, and much more. The collection includes about 20 Ford Model T’s of various years as well as one of Boise’s early fire trucks. This is a self-guided event where members can peruse the collection at their own pace. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The second offering will take place at 11 a.m. on May 8.
Date and time: Fri., May 8, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Location: 1090 Boeing St., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 50

LOTTERY: Explore the Yanke Motor Museum: Event Two

Enjoy a morning at the Yanke Motor Museum to learn and experience a bit of the history of the Yanke family in the Treasure Valley. Members will be able to explore the Yanke family’s extensive collection featuring over 150 cars, trucks, motorcycles, and much more. The collection includes about 20 Ford Model T’s of various years as well as one of Boise’s early fire trucks. This is a self-guided event where members can peruse the collection at their own pace. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The first offering will take place at 9:30 a.m. on May 8.
Date and time: Fri., May 8, 11 a.m.-noon
Location: 1090 Boeing St., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 50

Federal Criminal Civil Rights Prosecutions

From hate crimes to police officer misconduct, this course will provide an introduction to federal criminal civil rights statutes and discuss their constitutional limitations and how prosecutors navigate intent and First Amendment protected activity. Special attention will be paid to investigations and prosecutions in Idaho, including Idaho’s first prosecution based on sexual orientation, as well as significant federal civil rights prosecutions throughout the nation.
Presenter: Wendy Olson, JD, former U.S. Attorney for the District of Idaho
Date and time: Fri., May 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $45

Taking the Mystery out of Medicare: Lecture Two

Are you confused by the confusing alphabet soup that is Medicare? Join Dr. Jamie Whitlock as he explains the ins and outs of Medicare, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage Plans, drug plans, enrollment periods, and more. Please note: Due to anticipated interest, we are offering this lecture twice. The first offering takes place on March 19.
Presenter: Jamie Whitlock, MD, retired chiropractor and Medicare educator
Date and time: Thu., May 14, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Policy Considerations in Idaho

Join Rep. Mathew Erpelding as he presents the process by which policy ideas become law in Idaho. Learn about the process from start to finish and get your questions answered about the current political landscape in Idaho.
Presenter: Rep. Mathew Erpelding, Democratic member, Idaho House of Representatives
Date and time: Thu., May 14, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: Included with membership

Monarch Butterflies

This lecture will provide an introduction to the monarch butterfly and will include current information on the population in our local area, potential listing as an endangered species, and anecdotes from Hollie Leavitt’s trip to Mexico’s El Rosario butterfly sanctuary, the overwintering site for monarch butterflies. Members will also learn how to create a backyard garden that will support this iconic species. Please note: This is an updated presentation of Hollie Leavitt’s spring 2018 lecture.
Presenter: Hollie Leavitt, Associate Professor of Biology, College of Western Idaho
Date and time: Fri., May 15, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: Included with membership

Beethoven String Quartet Cycle: Performance Four

The year 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth; orchestras and ensembles around the world are already planning celebratory events in honor of the occasion. Join violinist Laurel Tally, violist Jennifer Drake, cellist Brian Hodges, and other string players as they perform two quartets—Op. 18, No. 4 and Op. 132—in an intimate classroom setting. This unique experience spans from September 2019 to May 2021, and all 16 of Beethoven’s quartets will be played by the end of the cycle. Please note: Each performance requires separate registration. The third performance takes place on February 8.
Date and time: Sat., May 16, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Location: Morrison Center Recital Hall, Boise State Department of Music, 2201 Cesar Chavez Ln., Boise
Cost: $25

Searching for America’s Conscience and Soul: Course One

Time has a way of altering a nation’s values and principles—sometimes to the point that it becomes unrecognizable. This course will search for America’s conscience and soul through examination of three main ideas: Fundamental rights and the sins at the creation; Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms; and Pulitzer-Prize winning New York Times’ columnist Anthony Lewis’ characterization of the U.S. Supreme Court as “the conscience of the nation.” Please note: This course will feature extensive Q & A with the presenter. Due to anticipated interest, this course is offered twice.
Presenter: Dr. David Adler, President, Alturas Institute
Date and time: Tue., Wed., and Thu., May 19, 20, and 21, 10 a.m.-noon
Cost: $35

Searching for America’s Conscience and Soul: Course Two

Time has a way of altering a nation’s values and principles—sometimes to the point that it becomes unrecognizable. This course will search for America’s conscience and soul through examination of three main ideas: Fundamental rights and the sins at the creation; Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms; and Pulitzer-Prize winning New York Times’ columnist Anthony Lewis’ characterization of the U.S. Supreme Court as “the conscience of the nation.” Please note: This course will feature extensive Q & A with the presenter. Due to anticipated interest, this course is offered twice.
Presenter: Dr. David Adler, President, Alturas Institute
Date and time: Tue., Wed., and Thu., May 19, 20, and 21, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Cost: $35

LOTTERY: Basque Museum Tour: Event One

The mission of the Basque Museum and Cultural Center is to preserve, promote, and perpetuate Basque history and culture. On this tour, members will be introduced to Basque culture, visit the museum exhibits, and tour the restored Cyrus Jacobs Uberuaga Boarding house and Anduiza Fronton ball court. Please note: This tour will require standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The second offering takes place on May 28.
Date and time: Wed., May 27, 10-11:30 a.m.
Location: 611 W. Grove St., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 25

LOTTERY: Basque Museum Tour: Event Two

The mission of the Basque Museum and Cultural Center is to preserve, promote, and perpetuate Basque history and culture. On this tour, members will be introduced to Basque culture, visit the museum exhibits, and tour the restored Cyrus Jacobs Uberuaga Boarding house and Anduiza Fronton ball court. Please note: This tour will require standing and walking for extended periods of time. Due to limited capacity and anticipated interest, this event is offered twice. The first offering takes place on May 27.
Date and time: Thu., May 28, 10-11:30 a.m.
Location: 611 W. Grove St., Boise
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 25

Starting in June

2020 Spring Social

Back by popular demand! This event will mark the end of our spring semester and provide members an opportunity to socialize outside the classroom. Enjoy refreshments and a short program that includes a behind-the-scenes look at the Osher Institute and a big thank-you to the many volunteers who help make the Institute possible. Please note: This event is free, but registration is required. Registered members are welcome to bring a guest.
Date and time: Wed., Jun. 3, 2-4 p.m.
Location: Stueckle Sky Center, Boise State University
Cost: Included with membership
Capacity: 400

Special Interest Groups (SIGs)

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) are typically member-led opportunities that occur outside of regular Osher Institute classroom programming. SIGs are a great way to get to know other members and try new things in a casual, conversational setting. Joining a SIG is free, but registration is required.

Alpine Skiing

Winter still offers the perfect opportunity for getting together and staying active outside! Our brand-new Alpine Skiing SIG, led by Hiking SIG co-facilitator Dennis Hynes, will begin this month to hit the slopes at Bogus Basin. This SIG will meet on Wednesday mornings. All ability levels are welcome to explore the runs as a group for a few hours. The first SIG meeting will take place on Wednesday, January 22. For those who would like to carpool, a group will meet at 10 a.m. in the northwest corner of the Osher parking lot on Parkcenter Blvd. The group will assemble at Bogus Basin at 11 a.m. on the Idaho Central Credit Union Plaza outside the Simplot Lodge. If you would like to add your name to the SIG list, please contact the Osher office at (208) 426-6554.

Facilitator: Dennis Hynes, Osher member and Hiking in the Foothills co-facilitator

Befriend Your Cell Phone

Are you frustrated when your cell phone doesn’t work for you? Learn how to sequence keystrokes to find that favorite photo, organize mail, pay bills online, and solve other problems by collaborating with fellow Osher members. Through scheduled half-hour lectures and small group interactions, you may fall in love with your cell phone. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the meeting locations.
Facilitator: Marilee Haynes, Osher member
Meetings: First and third Friday of each month, 10-11:30 a.m.
Capacity: 50

Conversational Spanish

Maintain your Spanish skills by conversing with fellow Osher members, completely in Spanish, for approximately one hour. A basic level of Spanish vocabulary and grammar is strongly recommended in order to participate in this SIG. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the next meeting date. Please note: This SIG meets at two different locations throughout the month, as indicated below.
Facilitator: Roy Schiele, Osher member
Meetings and Locations:
1st and 3rd Thursday: 10:30 a.m. at the Library! at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Dr., Boise
2nd and 4th Thursday: 11 a.m. at the Garden City Public Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City

Drawing with Friends

Take part in a casual gathering with other Osher members who enjoy drawing. Members will be guided and assisted by an experienced facilitator, and each session will include a brief demonstration of a useful technique or concept that can enhance your skills. Subject matter will be varied and personalized. Previous drawing experience is recommended. Members are required to provide their own supplies. After you register, you will receive an email with details on meeting dates and locations.
Facilitator: Susie Fisher, Osher member
Capacity: 30

First Friday Astronomy Lectures at Boise State

Interested in planets, space exploration, and life elsewhere in the universe? Members of this SIG will receive advance notifications of First Friday Astronomy Lectures hosted by Dr. Brian Jackson and the Boise State Department of Physics. Weather permitting, stargazing will take place in the Boise State Observatory after the lecture. Please note: First Friday Lectures are not exclusively for Osher members and are free and open to the public. Seating is available on a first-come-first-served basis. The observatory is not ADA compliant, but telescopes will be available at ground level near the observatory. Questions can be sent to Prof. Jackson at bjackson@boisestate.edu.
Facilitator: Dr. Brian Jackson, planetary astronomer and Associate Professor of Physics, Boise State University
Meetings: First Friday of each month, February through June, 7:30 p.m.
Location: Room 112, Science and Education Building, Boise State University

Hiking in the Foothills

Come explore Boise’s wonderful Ridge to Rivers trail system on moderately strenuous hikes of one-and-a-half to two hours in duration. Start from a different trailhead each week to experience the beauty of the open space surrounding our city. Information with details on date, time, and location will be emailed in advance of the planned hike. Please note: Due to parking and group size constraints, members who enroll in this group will be split into two groups that will hike different trails each week.
Facilitator: Mike Merz, Osher member and Boise State Emeritus, and Dennis Hynes, Osher member
Hikes: Once a week, March through June, 10 a.m.-noon

Make Your Family Tree Better

Meet with other Osher members to discuss common questions and issues involved with family history research and genealogy. Discover new ways to find solutions to your research challenges, hear other members’ experiences, and share your own findings with the group. After you register, you will receive an email with details on meeting dates and locations.
Facilitator: Thad Webster, Osher member
Capacity: 80

Memoir Writing

Join Osher Institute members who are interested in writing memoirs—a collection of memories that an individual writes about moments or events. We meet for two hours on the first and third Friday afternoons of each month, with peer-led rotating facilitators. After you register, you will receive an email with details on the next meeting date.
Facilitator: Merilee Marsh, Osher member
Meetings: First and third Friday of each month, 1-3 p.m.
Location: Library! at Bown Crossing, 2153 E. Riverwalk Dr., Boise
Capacity: 30

(Mostly) Foreign Films at The Flicks

Join Osher members who enjoy films—both foreign and American—by gathering at The Flicks, Boise’s premier independent movie theater. Following each film, members will have the opportunity to meet in the theater for a short discussion. An email with the selected film’s title, description, and showtime will be sent in advance of the selected date. Please note: Due to robust interest in this SIG and the limited size of the theater, the film may sell out.
Facilitator: Patricia Alpine, Osher member
Meetings: One Monday a month, January through June, around 5 p.m.
Location: 646 W. Fulton St., Boise

Piano Players

Do you enjoy playing piano and sharing music with others? Practice performing piano in front of others in this casual group format. All are welcome; beginners and advanced players alike. After you register, you will receive an email with details on meeting dates and locations.
Facilitator: Bill Donovan, Osher member
Capacity: 20

Walking the Greenbelt

Take part in the beauty of the Boise River Greenbelt with other members who want to get exercise while enjoying the sights and sounds of nature. Moderate to brisk walks that begin and end at the Yanke Building will be the core of this SIG.
Facilitator: River Wilson, Osher member
Meetings: Mondays and Fridays, March through July, 10-11 a.m.
Location: 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. Meet on the east side of the building.

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